Nanostructures for Cancer Therapy - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780323461443, 9780323461504

Nanostructures for Cancer Therapy

1st Edition

Editors: Alexandru Grumezescu Anton Ficai
eBook ISBN: 9780323461504
Hardcover ISBN: 9780323461443
Imprint: Elsevier
Published Date: 14th April 2017
Page Count: 920
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Nanotechnology for personalized medicine: cancer research, diagnosis, and therapy

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Main Types of Cancer
  • 3. Personalized Treatment of Cancer
  • 4. Nanotreatment of Cancer
  • 5. Nanodrugs and Nanocarriers
  • 6. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 2: Bioengineered nanomaterials for chemotherapy

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Polymeric Nanoparticles
  • 3. Carbon Nanotubes
  • 4. Gold Nanoparticles
  • 5. Supermagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles
  • 6. Fullerenes
  • 7. Dendrimers
  • 8. Quantum Dots
  • 9. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 3: Biofunctionalized nanomaterials for targeting cancer cells

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Targeting Strategies for Cancer Cells
  • 3. Combination of Nanostructures With Chemotherapeutic Agents
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment

Chapter 4: Improving chemotherapy drug delivery by nanoprecision tools

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Conventional Cancer Treatment
  • 3. Nanoparticles for Chemotherapy Delivery System
  • 4. Challenges Facing Nanomedicine in Oncology
  • 5. Conclusions

Chapter 5: RIPL peptide as a novel cell-penetrating and homing peptide: design, characterization, and application to liposomal nanocarriers for hepsin-specific intracellular drug delivery

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Cell-Penetrating and Homing Peptide
  • 3. RIPL Peptide for Hpn-Specificity
  • 4. RIPL-Conjugated Liposomes
  • 5. Cytotoxicities of RIPL and RIPL-Lipo
  • 6. Summary
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 6: Progress of nanoparticles research in cancer therapy and diagnosis

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Nanoparticles as Efficient Drug-Delivery Systems
  • 3. Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgement

Chapter 7: Interfacial engineering of nanoparticles for cancer therapeutics

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Characteristics of Drug Delivery Carriers
  • 3. Different Types of Nanoparticle-Based Delivery Systems
  • 4. Site-Specific Targeting of Nanoparticles
  • 5. Pharmacokinetics and Biodistribution of Nanoparticles
  • 6. Future Perspectives

Chapter 8: Nanotechnological approaches toward cancer chemotherapy

  • Abstract
  • 1. Nanotherapeutics
  • 2. The Development of Nanotherapeutics
  • 3. Nanostructures for Cancer Therapy
  • 4. Methods for Fabrication of Nanoparticles
  • 5. Mode of Entry of Nanoparticles in Cells
  • 6. Controlled Drug Delivery Systems
  • 7. Nanoparticles for Cancer Drug Delivery: Active versus Passive Targeting
  • 8. Targeted Drug Delivery Systems
  • 9. Pharmacokinetics of Nanotherapeutics
  • 10. Toxicology of Nanoformulations
  • 11. The Gap Between Laboratory Synthesis and Commercial Viability of Production of Nanoformulations
  • 12. Conclusions

Chapter 9: Cancer therapies: applications, nanomedicines and nanotoxicology

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Applications of Chemotherapy
  • 3. Nanomedicines for Cancer Therapy
  • 4. Nanotoxicology
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 10: Multifunctional polymeric micelles as therapeutic nanostructures: targeting, imaging, and triggered release

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Encapsulation of Drug
  • 3. Drug Delivery
  • 4. Triggered Release
  • 5. Appropriate Targeting
  • 6. Imaging
  • 7. Multifunctional Micelles
  • 8. Conclusions

Chapter 11: Recent advances in diagnosis and therapy of skin cancers through nanotechnological approaches

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Epidemiology of Skin Cancers
  • 3. Modern Diagnosis of Skin Cancers
  • 4. Modern Treatment of Skin Cancers
  • 5. Nanosystems in the Diagnosis of Skin Cancers
  • 6. Nanosystems in the Therapy of Skin Cancers
  • 7. Conclusions and Perspectives

Chapter 12: Design of nanoparticle structures for cancer immunotherapy

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Dendritic Cells
  • 3. Targeting Dendritic Cells in Vaccine Development by Nanoparticles
  • 4. Nanoparticle-Based Immunotherapy for Cancer
  • 5. Immunological Properties of Engineered Nanoparticles
  • 6. Conclusions

Chapter 13: Recent advances of folate-targeted anticancer therapies and diagnostics: current status and future prospectives

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Principles of Folate-Targeting Strategy
  • 3. Folate-Targeted Anticancer Therapy
  • 4. Folate-Targeted Systems as Diagnostic Tools in Cancer
  • 5. Conclusions and Future Prospectives
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 14: Anticancer efficiency of curcumin-loaded invertible polymer micellar nanoassemblies

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Synthesis of Amphiphilic Invertible Polymers
  • 3. Micellization, Self-Assembly, and Invertible Properties of AIPs
  • 4. Self-Assembly of AIPs in Water: Potential for Stimuli-Responsive Drug Delivery
  • 5. Invertible Polymer Micellar Nanoassemblies as a Unique Delivery System Targeted to Osteosarcoma Cells
  • 6. Conclusions

Chapter 15: Dose enhancement effect in radiotherapy: adding gold nanoparticles to tumor in cancer treatment

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Application of Gold Nanoparticles in Radiotherapy
  • 3. Dose Enhancement due to Gold Nanoparticle Addition
  • 4. Gold Nanoparticle-Enhanced Radiotherapy
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment

Chapter 16: Silver-based nanostructures for cancer therapy

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Silver-Based Nanostructures for Tumor Diagnosis
  • 3. Silver-Based Nanostructures for Tumor Targeted and Controlled Delivery Systems
  • 4. Silver-Based Nanostructures for Tumor External-Activated Treatment
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 17: Ligand-decorated polysaccharide nanocarriers for targeting therapeutics to hepatocytes

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Different Ligand-Polysaccharide Nanocarriers
  • 3. Conclusions

Chapter 18: Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs: new trends in lipid nanocarriers

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Drug Delivery Systems: Concepts and Characteristics of Lipid Nanocarriers
  • 3. Strategies for Targeted Drug Delivery in Cancer
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 19: Nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia

  • Abstract
  • 1. Magnetic Hyperthermia in Cancer Therapy
  • 2. Clinical Constraints
  • 3. Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia
  • 4. Mechanisms of Heat Dissipation
  • 5. Nanoparticles Synthesis and Coating
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 20: Nanotechnology: a challenge in hard tissue engineering with emphasis on bone cancer therapy

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Representative Materials for Hard Tissue Engineering
  • 3. Drug Delivery Systems Designed for Hard Tissue Engineering
  • 4. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 21: Combination therapy of macromolecules and small molecules: approaches, advantages, and limitations

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Peptides and Proteins as Therapeutic Agents in Cancer
  • 3. Proteins as Targeting Agents in Cancer
  • 4. Nucleic Acid-Based Macromolecule Therapeutics
  • 5. Conclusions

Chapter 22: Nanosized drug delivery systems as radiopharmaceuticals

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Future Perspectives

Chapter 23: Mesoporous silica nanoparticles: a promising multifunctional drug delivery system

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Types and Synthesis of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles
  • 3. Surface Functionalization of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles
  • 4. Therapeutic Applications of MSNPs
  • 5. Biological Performance of MSNPs
  • 6. Characterization of MSNPs
  • 7. Conclusion

Chapter 24: Cancer therapies based on enzymatic amino acid depletion

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Amino Acid Deprivation Enzymes
  • 3. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 25: Self-emulsifying delivery systems: one step ahead in improving solubility of poorly soluble drugs

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Various Formulation Strategies to Enhance Solubility and Permeability
  • 3. Self-Emulsifying Drug Delivery System
  • 4. Lipid Formulations (Charman et  al.,  1992; Colin,  2000; Collin,  1997; Pouton,  2000; Pouton and Porter,  2008)
  • 5. Type of Spontaneously Emulsifying System (SEDDS)
  • 6. Structure of SEDDS
  • 7. Theories and Thermodynamics of Microemulsion Formulation
  • 8. Difference Between SMEDDs and SNEDDs
  • 9. Factors to be Consider for the Development of SEDDS
  • 10. Suitable Drug Candidate Identification for SEDDS (Gursoy and Benita, 2004)
  • 11. Composition of SEDDS
  • 12. Formation of SEDDS
  • 13. Construction of Phase Diagram (Aungst et  al.,  1993; Colin,  2000; Collin,  1997; Patel et  al.,  2008; Sahji,  2010; Singh et  al.,  2009b)
  • 14. Mechanism of Self-Emulsification
  • 15. Factors Affecting Formation of Microemulsion (Adhvait,  2010; Bhupinder et  al.,  2013; Khan et  al.,  2012; Patil and Paradkar,  2004; Tatyana, 2000)
  • 16. Absorption Mechanism for Self-Microemulsification (Colin,  2008; Gupta et  al.,  2013; Pouton and Porter,  2008; Tatyana,  2000)
  • 17. Biopharmaceutical Issues in the Selection of SEDDS
  • 18. Advantages
  • 19. Disadvantages (Chavda et al., 2012; Chavda, 2013; Colin,  2008; Muzaffar et  al.,  2013)
  • 20. Evaluation
  • 21. Applications
  • 22. Advancement in Self-Emulsifying Systems
  • 23. Marketed Formulation of SMEDDS
  • 24. Recent Patents on Advanced Self-Emulsifying Systems
  • 25. Conclusions

Chapter 26: Near-infrared light-responsive nanotherapeutic agents: application in medical oncology

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Nanomolecule and Its Application in Medicine
  • 3. Using Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Nanomolecule in Medical Oncology
  • 4. Safety Consideration in Using Near-Infrared Light-Responsive Nanomolecule in Medical Oncology
  • 5. Conclusions

Chapter 27: Current aspects of breast cancer therapy and diagnosis based on a nanocarrier approach

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Nanosystems Containing Anticancer Agents Used for Metastatic Breast Cancer: Current Clinical Practice and Trial Studies
  • 3. Use of Selective Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Detection, Analysis, Diagnosis, and Therapeutic Intervention
  • 4. Overcoming Breast Cancer Drug Resistance
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgment

Chapter 28: Natural plant-derived anticancer drugs nanotherapeutics: a review on preclinical to clinical success

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Plants as Source of Anticancer Agents
  • 3. Physicochemical and Biopharmaceutical Limitations of Plant-Derived Anticancer Drugs
  • 4. Nanomedicines in Cancer
  • 5. Preclinical or Clinical Status of Plant-Derived Natural Anticancer Nanomedicines
  • 6. Conclusions

Chapter 29: Nanotherapy: a next generation hallmark for combating cancer

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Nanotechnology in Cancer and Treatment
  • 3. Conclusions and Final Remarks
  • Acknowledgments

Chapter 30: Nanostructures for cancer therapy: from targeting to selective toxicology

  • Abstract
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Targeted Cancer Therapies
  • 3. Nanoparticles Used in Cancer Therapy
  • 4. Toxicological Aspects of Nanoscale Drug Delivery Systems
  • 5. Conclusions
  • Acknowledgments

Description

Nanostructures for Cancer Therapy discusses the available preclinical and clinical nanoparticle technology platforms and their impact on cancer therapy, including current trends and developments in the use of nanostructured materials in chemotherapy and chemotherapeutics.

In particular, coverage is given to the applications of gold nanoparticles and quantum dots in cancer therapies. In addition to the multifunctional nanomaterials involved in the treatment of cancer, other topics covered include nanocomposites that can target tumoral cells and the release of antitumoral therapeutic agents.

The book is an up-to-date overview that covers the inorganic and organic nanostructures involved in the diagnostics and treatment of cancer.

Key Features

  • Provides an examination of nanoparticle delivery systems for cancer treatment, illustrating how the use of nanotechnology can help provide more effective chemotherapeutic treatments
  • Examines, in detail, the different types of nanomaterials used in cancer therapy, also explaining the effect of each
  • Provides a cogent overview of recent developments in the use of nanostructured materials in chemotherapeutics, allowing readers to quickly familiarize themselves with this area

Readership

Biomaterials scientists, materials scientists, biomedical engineers, medicinal chemists and postgraduate students specializing in the areas of nanomedicine, bionanomaterials and nanotechnology applications in healthcare


Details

No. of pages:
920
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Elsevier 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier
eBook ISBN:
9780323461504
Hardcover ISBN:
9780323461443

About the Editors

Alexandru Grumezescu Editor

Dr. Grumezescu is Assistant Professor at the Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, in the Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, with a second affiliation to the Faculty of Medical Engineering, at the Politehnica University of Bucharest in Romania. He is an experienced and oft-published researcher and editor in the field of nano and biomaterials, and he is the Editor-in-Chief of three journals: Biointerface Research in Applied Chemistry, Letters and Applied NanoBioScience, and Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Bulletin. He also serves as editor or guest editor for several notable journals. Dr. Grumezescu has published 150 peer-reviewed papers, 20 book chapters, 6 co-authored books and 11 edited books.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science and Faculty of Medical Engineering, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania

Anton Ficai Editor

Anton Ficai is Assistant Professor at the Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania. His research activity is mainly focused on biomaterials for bone healing and treatment. He has been involved in various projects dealing with bone cancer treatment and pain management (especially associated with bone cancer). His patent application related to bone cancer treatment was recently awarded with the Gold Medal by “BRUSSELS INNOVA - The World Exhibition on Inventions, Research and New Technologies”. Anton Ficai is also active in the field of synthesis and characterization of drug delivery systems, synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, biomaterials or antimicrobial materials, etc. Dr Ficai serves on he Editorial Board of three journals, and has also been the guest editor of Current Pharmaceutical Design.

He has been awarded over 20 prizes for his academic and research activity, and was invited as Visiting Professor of University of Beira Interior. He has given oral presentations at more than 10 international conferences and published over 100 papers and 12 books and book chapters.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, Romania