Nanobiomaterials in Galenic Formulations and Cosmetics - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780323428682, 9780323428910

Nanobiomaterials in Galenic Formulations and Cosmetics

1st Edition

Applications of Nanobiomaterials

Editors: Alexandru Grumezescu
eBook ISBN: 9780323428910
Hardcover ISBN: 9780323428682
Imprint: William Andrew
Published Date: 2nd June 2016
Page Count: 460
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Description

Nanobiomaterials in Galenic Formulations and Cosmetics: Applications of Nanobiomaterials is one of the first books on the market related to the application of nanotechnology in galenic formulations and cosmetics. This book provides the results of current research for those working in an applied setting. The advantage of having all this information in one coherent text is the focused nature of the chapters and the ease of which this information can be accessed.

This collection of titles brings together many of the novel applications these materials have in biology, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each application and the perspectives of the technologies based on these findings. At the moment there is no other comparable book series covering all the subjects approached in this set of titles.

Key Features

  • Offers an updated and highly structured reference material for students, researchers, and practitioners working in biomedical, biotechnological, and engineering fields
  • Serves as a valuable resource of recent scientific progress, along with most known applications of nanomaterials in the biomedical field
  • Features novel opportunities and ideas for developing or improving technologies in nanomedicine and nanobiology

Readership

Academic: Materials science, biotechnology, applied chemistry - professors, PhD, MsC, postdocs, upper level undergraduates

Industry: pharmaceutics and biotechnology companies, medical researchers, biomedical engineers, advanced clinicians (e.g. in dentistry).

Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Preface of the series
  • Preface
    • About the Series (Volumes I–XI)
    • About Volume X
  • Chapter 1. Advances in nanobiomaterials for topical administrations: new galenic and cosmetic formulations
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Skin as Site for Topical Delivery
    • 1.3 Nanobiomaterials
    • 1.4 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 2. Nanosunscreens: from nanoencapsulated to nanosized cosmetic active forms
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Inorganic Nanoparticles as UV Filters
    • 2.3 Studies on Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Nanoparticles Acting as UV Filters
    • 2.4 Nanoencapsulated Chemical Sunscreens
    • 2.5 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 3. Nanocosmetics: performance enhancement and safety assurance
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Cosmetics: Performance Enhancement Using Nanotechnology
    • 3.3 Nanocosmetics: Types and Applications
    • 3.4 Classification of Nanocosmetics on the Basis of Formulation Technologies
    • 3.5 Nanocosmetics: Some Popular Categories
    • 3.6 Nanotechnology for UV Protection
    • 3.7 Formulation and Manufacturing Aspects
    • 3.8 Nanomaterial Characterization
    • 3.9 Guidance Documents on Nanomaterials in Cosmetics
    • 3.10 Safety Assurance
    • 3.11 Impurity Profiling
    • 3.12 Assessment of Nanomaterial Toxicology
    • 3.13 Routes of Exposure
    • 3.14 Toxicity Testing
    • 3.15 Safety Assessment
    • 3.16 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 4. What nanocrystals can offer to cosmetic and dermal formulations
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Production of Nanocrystals
    • 4.3 What Nanocrystals Can Offer
    • 4.4 Nanosuspension of Cosmetic Compounds
    • 4.5 Commercial Aspects
    • 4.6 Conclusions and Perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 5. Role of liposomal drug-delivery system in cosmetics
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Introduction of Liposomes
    • 5.2 Selection Criteria of Liposomes to be Used in Cosmetics
    • 5.3 Mechanism of Action of Liposomes
    • 5.4 Method of Preparation of Liposomes
    • 5.5 Cosmetic Benefits of Liposomes
    • 5.6 Limitations of Liposomes as a Carrier
    • 5.7 Characterization Parameters of Liposomal-Based Cosmeceuticals
    • 5.8 Liposome-Based Cosmeceuticals
    • 5.9 Safety of Liposomes in Cosmetic Products
    • 5.10 Regulations of Nanocosmaceuticals
    • 5.11 Conclusions and Future Perspectives
    • References
  • Chapter 6. Nanobiomaterials in galenic formulations and cosmetics
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 Cosmetic Applications
    • 6.3 Nanotechnology for Better Delivery
    • 6.4 Nanotechnology for UV Protection
    • 6.5 Further Nanoparticles Used in Cosmetics
    • 6.6 Safety Issues
    • 6.7 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 7. Nanobiomaterials in cosmetics: current status and future prospects
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Applications of Nanoparticles in Cosmetics
    • 7.3 Advantages of Using Nanomaterials in Cosmetics
    • 7.4 Types of Nanomaterials
    • 7.5 Patents
    • 7.6 Route of Exposure and Translocation of Nanoparticles
    • 7.7 Future Prospects
    • 7.8 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 8. Nanocapsules as carriers of active substances
    • Abstract
    • Abbreviations
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 The Definition of Nanoencapsulation and Structure of Nanocapsules
    • 8.3 Nanocapsule Preparation
    • 8.4 Characterization of Nanocapsules
    • 8.5 Application of Nanocapsules in Cosmetology, Pharmacy, and Medicine
    • 8.6 Advantages of Nanocapsules
    • 8.7 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 9. Sunscreens
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 What are Sunscreens?
    • 9.3 Why Should People Use Sunscreens?
    • 9.4 History of Sunscreens
    • 9.5 Ideal Sunscreen Properties
    • 9.6 Approved Active Ingredients of Sunscreens
    • 9.7 Applications of Nanotechnology in Sunscreens
    • 9.8 Present Market for Nanosunscreens
    • 9.9 Future Prospects
    • 9.10 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 10. Solid lipid nanoparticles and nanostructured lipid carriers as novel carriers for cosmetic ingredients
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 The Skin and Drug Penetration
    • 10.3 Novel Carriers
    • 10.4 Methods of Preparation SLNs and NLCs
    • 10.5 Analytical Characterization of Nanoparticles
    • 10.6 SLNs and NLCs in Cosmetics
    • 10.7 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 11. Skin autoimmune disorders: lipid biopolymers and colloidal delivery systems for topical delivery
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Autoimmune Dermal Disorders
    • 11.3 Causes of Autoimmune Disorders of Skin
    • 11.4 Treatment Strategies
    • 11.5 Hurdles in Drug Delivery Through Skin and Techniques to Overcome
    • 11.6 Lipid-Based Systems for Drug Delivery Through Skin
    • 11.7 Safety and Efficacy Profile of Lipids as Delivery System
    • 11.8 Lipid Colloidal Drug-Delivery Cargos for Autoimmune Skin Disorder
    • 11.9 Lipid-Based Colloidal Carriers
    • 11.10 Lipid Particulate Carriers
    • 11.11 Solid Lipid Nanoparticles
    • 11.12 Emulsion-Based Carriers
    • 11.13 Microemulsions
    • 11.14 Conclusions
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 12. The role of liposomes and lipid nanoparticles in the skin hydration
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 The Skin Structure
    • 12.3 Skin Hydration
    • 12.4 Lipid-Based Nanocarriers
    • 12.5 Regulatory Aspects
    • 12.6 Other Applications
    • 12.7 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 13. Lipid nanoparticles for topical application of drugs for skin diseases
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Treatment of Topical Skin Disease: Potential Problems
    • 13.3 Liposomes
    • 13.4 Ethosomes
    • 13.5 Solid Lipid Nanoparticles
    • 13.6 Nanostructured Lipid Carriers
    • 13.7 Lipid Nanocapsules
    • 13.8 Microemulsion
    • 13.9 Production of Lipid Nanoparticles
    • 13.10 Action Mechanisms of Lipid-Based Colloid Systems for Topical Delivery
    • 13.11 Pharmaceutical Formulations and Benefits
    • 13.12 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 14. Nanocarriers in cosmetology
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Nanosize
    • 14.2 Characterization of Nanosized Systems
    • 14.3 Different Types of Nanosystems Used in the Cosmetic Field
    • 14.4 Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 15. Silver nanoparticles as a challenge for modern cosmetology and pharmacology
    • Abstract
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 Synthesis
    • 15.3 Differences Between the Physicochemical Properties of Conventional Materials and Nanomaterials
    • 15.4 Detection and Analysis of Samples Containing SNs
    • 15.5 Biological Activity of SNs
    • 15.6 Parameters Determining the Biological Activity of SNs
    • 15.7 Mechanisms of Antimicrobial Activity of SNs
    • 15.8 The Use of SNs in Cosmetic and Galenic Formulations
    • 15.9 Resistance to Antimicrobials
    • 15.10 SNs Toxicology
    • 15.11 Safety of Cosmetic and Galenic Formulas Containing SNs
    • 15.12 Conclusions
    • References
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
460
Language:
English
Copyright:
© William Andrew 2016
Published:
Imprint:
William Andrew
eBook ISBN:
9780323428910
Hardcover ISBN:
9780323428682

About the Editor

Alexandru Grumezescu

Alexandru Grumezescu

Dr. Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu is Assistant Professor at the Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, in the Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, with a second affiliation to the Faculty of Medical Engineering, at the Politehnica University of Bucharest in Romania. He is an experienced and oft-published researcher and editor in the field of nano and biostructures, and he is the Editor-in-Chief of three journals: Biointerface Research in Applied Chemistry, Letters and Applied NanoBioScience, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Bulletin, and Journal of Food Bioengineering and Nanoprocessing. He also serves as editor or guest editor for several notable journals. Dr. Grumezescu has published 150 peer-reviewed papers, 20 book chapters, 8 co-authored books and 21 edited books. He has developed two new research directions related to bio-applications of metal oxide nanoparticles: (i) functional metal oxide nanostructures to improve the delivery of antimicrobials in active form with a high efficiency against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; and (ii) smart metal oxide nanostructures, functionalized with different fatty acids, essential oils or in combination with organic polymers, to inhibit bacterial colonization of different medical or industrial surfaces. Dr Alexandru Mihai Grumezescu is also Assistant Professor at the Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, in the Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science at the Politehnica University of Bucharest in Romania. He is an experienced and oft-published researcher and editor in the field of nano- and biostructures, and he is the Editor-in-Chief of four journals: Biointerface Research in Applied Chemistry, Letters and Applied NanoBioScience, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering Bulletin, and Journal of Food Bioengineering and Nanoprocessing. He also serves as editor or guest editor for several notable journals. Dr Grumezescu has published 160 peer-reviewed papers, 20 book chapters, 9 coauthored books, and 21 edited books. Other details are available at http://grumezescu.com/.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science and Faculty of Medical Engineering, Politehnica University of Bucharest, Romania