Nano-biosorbents for Decontamination of Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

Nano-biosorbents for Decontamination of Water, Air, and Soil Pollution

1st Edition - February 1, 2022

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  • Editors: Adil Denizli, Nisar Ali, Muhammad Bilal, Adnan Khan, Tuan Anh Nguyen
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323909136
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323909129

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Description

Nano-biosorbents for Decontamination of Water, Air, and Soil Pollution explores the properties of nanobiosorbents and their applications in the removal of contaminants from the natural environment. The use of nanobiosorbents for environmental protection is a combinational approach that incorporates nanotechnology with naturally occurring biopolymers that form an amalgamation of nano-biopolymers used as sorbent materials in the removal of a variety of contaminants from wastewaters. This is an important reference source for materials scientists, bioscientists and environmental scientists who are looking to understand how nanobiosorbents are being used for a range of environmental applications.

Key Features

  • Highlights the environmental applications of chitosan-based, cellulose-based and polymer-based nanoscale biosorbents
  • Explains the advantages of using different types of nanobiosorbents for soil, water and air purification applications
  • Assesses the challenges associated with manufacturing nanobiosorbents cheaply and on an industrial scale

Readership

Materials scientists and engineers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contributors
  • Part I: Basics principles
  • Chapter 1: Nano-biosorbents for contaminant removal: An introduction
  • Abstract
  • 1.1: Introduction
  • 1.2: Nanobiopolymers
  • 1.3: Nanobiopolymer fabrication techniques
  • 1.4: Environmental applications of nanobiopolymers
  • 1.5: Conclusion
  • 1.6: Future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Introduction to nano-biosorbents
  • Abstract
  • 2.1: Introduction
  • 2.2: Concept of biosorption
  • 2.3: Incorporation of nanotechnology with biosorption
  • 2.4: Green approach for contaminants removal using nano-biosorbents
  • 2.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Nanobiosorbents: Basic principles, synthesis, and application for contaminants removal
  • Abstract
  • 3.1: Introduction
  • 3.2: Fundamentals of nanobiosorption
  • 3.3: General preparation of nanobiosorbents
  • 3.4: Common natural biopolymers based nanobiosorbents
  • 3.5: Applications of nanobiosorbents in contaminants removal
  • 3.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Methods for the synthesis of nano-biosorbents for the contaminant removal
  • Abstract
  • 4.1: Introduction
  • 4.2: Types of nano-biosorbents
  • 4.3: Methods for the synthesis of nano-biosorbents and their applications
  • 4.4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: An insight into the potential contaminants, their effects, and removal means
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 5.1: Contaminants of concern
  • 5.2: Understanding the major contaminants and sources
  • 5.3: Metals, metalloids, organometals
  • 5.4: Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs)
  • 5.5: Removal of emerging contaminants
  • 5.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Advantages of nanoadsorbents, biosorbents, and nanobiosorbents for contaminant removal
  • Abstract
  • 6.1: Introduction
  • 6.2: Types of contaminants
  • 6.3: Different methods for wastewater treatment
  • 6.4: Biosorption
  • 6.5: Factors affecting the biosorption process
  • 6.6: Types of adsorbents and their properties in wastewater treatment
  • 6.7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Nanomaterials for removal of heavy metals from wastewater
  • Abstract
  • 7.1: Introduction
  • 7.2: Pollution sources and treatment strategies
  • 7.3: Metal based-nanomaterials
  • 7.4: Metal oxide-based nanomaterials
  • 7.5: Biochar-supported NMs
  • 7.6: Biochar-supported nanoparticles heavy metals treatment
  • 7.7: Heavy metals elimination via adsorption
  • 7.8: Heavy metals removal through photocatalysis
  • 7.9: Photo-Fenton and Fenton reactions
  • 7.10: Conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Nanosorbents for heavy metals removal
  • Abstract
  • 8.1: Introduction
  • 8.2: Inorganic NMs
  • 8.3: Polymer-organic NMs
  • 8.4: Polymer-supported organic NCs
  • 8.5: Conclusions and perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Non-toxic nature of nano-biosorbents as a positive approach toward green environment
  • Abstract
  • 9.1: Introduction
  • 9.2: Nano-biosorbents surface modification for environmental remediation
  • 9.3: Magnetic nanoparticles immobilized as nano-biosorbent
  • 9.4: Application in heavy metal removal
  • 9.5: Application emerging contaminant
  • 9.6: Application classic contaminant
  • 9.7: Advantages of nano-engineered adsorbent and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Nanoadsorbents for environmental remediation of polluting agents
  • Abstract
  • 10.1: Introduction
  • 10.2: Nanoadsorbents and their useful aspects
  • 10.3: Carbon-based nanoadsorbents
  • 10.4: Nanoparticles-based nanoadsorbent materials
  • 10.5: Concluding remarks and outlook
  • References
  • Part 2: Cellulose-based nanobiosorbents for decontamination of environmental matrices
  • Chapter 11: Risk assessment of nanocellulose exposure
  • Abstract
  • 11.1: Introduction
  • 11.2: Risk assessment framework
  • 11.3: Guidelines and regulations
  • 11.4: Conclusions and implications of the study
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Cellulose-based nanobiosorbents: An insight
  • Abstract
  • 12.1: Introduction
  • 12.2: Nanocellulose and its sources
  • 12.3: Types of nanocellulose
  • 12.4: Environmental and agricultural applications of nanocellulose
  • 12.5: Conclusion and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Synthesis and properties of cellulose-based nanobiosorbents
  • Abstract
  • 13.1: Introduction
  • 13.2: Nanocellulose
  • 13.3: Isolation of nanocellulose from various sources
  • 13.4: Properties of nanocellulose
  • 13.5: Characterization of nanocellulose
  • 13.6: Surface modification of nanocellulose
  • 13.7: Nanocellulose-based nanocomposites
  • 13.8: Bacterial nanocellulose
  • 13.9: Properties of BNC
  • 13.10: Applications of nanocellulose
  • 13.11: Challenges and future perspectives
  • 13.12: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Introduction to cellulose-based nanobiosorbents
  • Abstract
  • 14.1: Contextualization
  • 14.2: Classification and preparation of CN structures
  • 14.3: Adsorption/desorption process
  • 14.4: Final remarks and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Cellulose composites as nanobiosorbents for ecological remediation
  • Abstract
  • 15.1: Introduction
  • 15.2: Ecological remediation by cellulose nanocomposites
  • 15.3: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Modification and derivatization of cellulose-based nanobiosorbents and their utilization in environmental remediation
  • Abstract
  • 16.1: Cellulose-based nanomaterials as biosorbents
  • 16.2: Molecular functionalization of cellulose-based materials
  • 16.3: Inorganic nanostructures modified cellulose: Improved multifunctional adsorbents
  • 16.4: Adsorbents with photocatalytic/antibacterial functions
  • 16.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Cellulose-based nano-biosorbents in water purification
  • Abstract
  • 17.1: Introduction
  • 17.2: Cellulose and its application
  • 17.3: Cellulose-based composites for the removal of dyes
  • 17.4: Cellulose-based composites for the removal of heavy metals
  • 17.5: Cellulose-based composites for the removal of pharmaceuticals
  • 17.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Part 3: Chitosan-based nanobiosorbents for deterioration of environmental matrices
  • Chapter 18: Toxic metals adsorption from water using chitosan nanoderivatives
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 18.1: Introduction
  • 18.2: Arsenic
  • 18.3: Cadmium
  • 18.4: Chromium
  • 18.5: Mercury
  • 18.6: Lead
  • 18.7: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Toxicological impact and adsorptive removal of triclosan from water bodies using chitosan and carbon-based nano-architectures
  • Abstract
  • 19.1: Introduction
  • 19.2: Occurrence, persistence, and ecological impacts of triclosan
  • 19.3: Toxicity and ecological effects of TCS
  • 19.4: Treatment technologies for removing TCS
  • 19.5: Removal of TCS by adsorption techniques
  • 19.6: Conclusions and perspectives
  • References
  • Part 4: Multifarious biopolymers as nanobiosorbents for decontamination of environmental matrices
  • Chapter 20: Sorbent based on citrus peel waste for wastewater treatment
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 20.1: Introduction
  • 20.2: Characteristics of citrus peel waste
  • 20.3: Conversion of citrus fruit waste to activated carbon
  • 20.4: Electrochemical properties of active carbon materials based on citrus fruits
  • 20.5: Regeneration of active carbon material
  • 20.6: Discussions
  • 20.7: Conclusion and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Alginate-based nanobiosorbents for bioremediation of environmental pollutants
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 21.1: Introduction
  • 21.2: Synthesis of alginate-based composites
  • 21.3: Role of alginate-based composites for removal of heavy metals
  • 21.4: Role of alginate-based composites for removal of dyes
  • 21.5: Removal of radionuclides
  • 21.6: Removal of pharmaceutical contaminants
  • 21.7: Conclusion and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Synthesis of novel nanobioadsorbent for the effective removal of Pb2 + and Zn2 + ions—Adsorption, equilibrium, modeling, and optimization studies
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 22.1: Introduction
  • 22.2: Materials and methods
  • 22.3: Results and discussion
  • 22.4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 23: Nanocrystalline NiO powder: Synthesis, characterization and emerging applications
  • Abstract
  • 23.1: Introduction
  • 23.2: Methods for synthesis and characterization of NiO powder
  • 23.3: Structures and properties of nanocrystalline NiO powders
  • 23.4: Emerging applications
  • 23.5: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 24: Attraction to adsorption: Preparation methods and performance of novel magnetic biochars for water and wastewater treatment
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 24.1: Introduction
  • 24.2: Synthesis and preparation methods
  • 24.3: Magnetic properties
  • 24.4: Adsorption applications
  • 24.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 25: Biomass-derived nanocomposites: A critical evaluation of their performance toward the capture of inorganic pollutants
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 25.1: Introduction
  • 25.2: Biomass-derived adsorbents
  • 25.3: Synthesis of nanocomposites
  • 25.4: Active phases
  • 25.5: Adsorbents for aqueous pollutants
  • 25.6: Adsorbents for pollutants in gaseous forms
  • 25.7: Adsorbents for soil remediation
  • 25.8: Conclusions-perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 26: Magnetic nanomaterials-based biosorbents
  • Abstract
  • 26.1: Introduction
  • 26.2: Fabrication of efficient magnetic nanomaterial biosorbents
  • 26.3: Surface modification of the selective magnetic nanoparticles
  • 26.4: Applications
  • 26.5: Determined the cost of MB
  • 26.6: Discard and exploitation of MBs from wastewater
  • 26.7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 646
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: February 1, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323909136
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323909129

About the Editors

Adil Denizli

Adil Denizli is Professor at Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara, Turkey. His main research fields are molecular imprinting technologies, purification of biomolecules by chromatographic methods, detection of molecules by sensors, production of polymers with different surface and bulk properties, shape and geometries, and application of these polymers in different applications.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Hacettepe University, Department of Chemistry, Ankara, Turkey

Nisar Ali

Dr. Nisar Ali has a PhD in Applied Chemistry and is currently working as an Associate Professor at the School of Chemical Engineering, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, China. He is also a researcher at the Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Biophysics, Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. He actively participates in research projects related to the synthesis of polymers and magnetic polymer composites that have special wettability properties and smart surfaces.

Affiliations and Expertise

Key Laboratory for Palygorskite Science and Applied Technology of Jiangsu Province National and Local Joint Engineering Research Center for Deep Utilization Technology of Rock-salt Resource Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian, China

Muhammad Bilal

Prof. Muhammad Bilal is an associate professor in the School of Life Science and Food Engineering, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian 223003, China and and Adjunct Researcher at Ton Duc Thang University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. He has published more than 350 research papers in the leading international journals and also serve as Associate editor in several journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

School of Life Science and Food Engineering, Huaiyin Institute of Technology, Huaian, China

Adnan Khan

Adnan Khan is Assistant Professor in the Institute of Chemical Sciences, at the University of Peshawar, Pakistan. His areas of research are physical and chemical modification of polymers and biopolymers, preparation of composite material using polymers and biopolymers, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles and nanocomposites, nanotechnology applications for environmental remediation, and nanotechnology applications for efficient photocatalytic degradation of dyes, pharmaceuticals and pesticides.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Institute of Chemical Sciences, University of Peshawar, Pakistan

Tuan Anh Nguyen

Dr. Tuan Anh Nguyen is a Principal Research Scientist, at the Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam. He completed his BSc in Physics from Hanoi University in 1992, and his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Paris Diderot University (France) in 2003. He was a Visiting Scientist at Seoul National University (South Korea, 2004) and the University of Wollongong (Australia, 2005). He then worked as a Postdoctoral Research Associate & Research Scientist at Montana State University (USA), 2006-2009. In 2012, he was appointed Head of the Microanalysis Department at the Institute for Tropical Technology (Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology). Dr. Nguyen is Editor-In-Chief of the Kenkyu Journal of Nanotechnology and Nanoscience and Founding Co-Editor-In-Chief of Current Nanotoxicity and Prevention. He has edited 32 books in the area of nanotechnology.

Affiliations and Expertise

Institute for Tropical Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi, Vietnam

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