Multifunctional and Nanoreinforced Polymers for Food Packaging - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781845697389, 9780857092786

Multifunctional and Nanoreinforced Polymers for Food Packaging

1st Edition

Editors: José-María Lagarón
Hardcover ISBN: 9781845697389
eBook ISBN: 9780857092786
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 9th May 2011
Page Count: 736
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out
315.00
190.00
240.00
Unavailable
Compatible Not compatible
VitalSource PC, Mac, iPhone & iPad Amazon Kindle eReader
ePub & PDF Apple & PC desktop. Mobile devices (Apple & Android) Amazon Kindle eReader
Mobi Amazon Kindle eReader Anything else

Institutional Access


Description

Recent developments in multifunctional and nanoreinforced polymers have provided the opportunity to produce high barrier, active and intelligent food packaging which can help ensure, or even enhance, the quality and safety of packaged foods. Multifunctional and nanoreinforced polymers for food packaging provides a comprehensive review of novel polymers and polymer nanocomposites for use in food packaging.

After an introductory chapter, Part one discusses nanofillers for plastics in food packaging. Chapters explore the use of passive and active nanoclays and hidrotalcites, cellulose nanofillers and electrospun nanofibers and nanocapsules. Part two investigates high barrier plastics for food packaging. Chapters assess the transport and high barrier properties of food packaging polymers such as ethylene-norbornene copolymers and advanced single-site polyolefins, nylon-MXD6 resins and ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymers before going on to explore recent advances in various plastic packaging technologies such as modified atmosphere packaging (MAP), nanoscale inorganic coatings and functional barriers against migration. Part three reviews active and bioactive plastics in food packaging. Chapters investigate silver-based antimicrobial polymers, the incorporation of antimicrobial/antioxidant natural extracts into polymeric films, and biaoctive food packaging strategies. Part four examines nanotechnology in sustainable plastics with chapters examining the food packaging applications of polylactic acid (PLA) nanocomposites, polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), starch-based polymers, chitosan and carragenan polysaccharides and protein-based resins for packaging gluten (WG)-based materials. The final chapter presents the safety and regulatory aspects of plastics as food packaging materials.

With its distinguished editor and international team of expert contributors Multifunctional and nanoreinforced polymers for food packaging proves a valuable resource for researchers in packaging in the food industry and polymer scientists interested in multifunctional and nanoreinforced materials.

Key Features

  • Provides a comprehensive review of novel polymers and polymer nanocomposites for use in food packaging
  • Discusses nanofillers for plastics in food packaging including the use of passive and active nanoclays and hidrotalcites and electrospun nanofibers
  • Investigates high barrier plastics for food packaging assessing recent advances in various plastic packaging technologies such as modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

Readership

Researchers in packaging in the food industry and polymer scientists interested in multifunctional and nanoreinforced materials

Table of Contents

Contributor contact details

Preface

Chapter 1: Multifunctional and nanoreinforced polymers for food packaging

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Structural factors governing barrier properties

1.3 Novel polymers and blends

1.4 Nanocomposites

1.5 Future trends

1.7 Appendix: Abbreviations

Part I: Nanofillers for plastics in food packaging

Chapter 2: Multifunctional nanoclays for food contact applications

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.1 Antimicrobial nanoclays

2.3 Oxygen-scavenging nanoclays

2.4 Future trends

Chapter 3: Hydrotalcites in nanobiocomposites

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc): basic chemistry

3.3 Organically modified biocompatible hydrotalcite-like compounds (HTlc)

3.4 Nanocomposites of biodegradable polymeric matrices and modified hydrotalcites

3.5 Conclusions and future trends

Chapter 4: Cellulose nanofillers for food packaging

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Morphological and structural characteristics of cellulose nanofillers

4.3 Extraction and refining of cellulose nanofillers

4.4 Mechanical properties of cellulose nanofillers

4.5 Surface modification of cellulose nanofillers

4.6 Preparation of cellulose-reinforced nanocomposites

4.7 Future trends and applications of cellulose nanofillers

Chapter 5: Electrospun nanofibers for food packaging applications

Abstract:

5.1 Electrospinning

5.2 Functional nanofibers

5.3 Nanoencapsulation

5.4 Electrospinning in packaging applications

5.5 Future trends

Part II: High barrier plastics for food packaging

Chapter 6: Mass transport and high barrier properties of food packaging polymers

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction: the basics of mass transport

6.2 Diffusivity

6.3 Solubility

6.4 What makes a barrier a barrier?

6.5 Characterisation techniques

Chapter 7: Ethylene–norbornene copolymers and advanced single-site polyolefins

Abstract:

7.1 Introduction

7.2 Synthesis and molecular structure: advanced single-site polyolefins

7.3 Macromolecular structure: advanced single-site polyolefins

7.4 Macromolecular structure: ethylene-norbornene copolymers

7.5 Nanocomposite preparation: advanced single-site polyolefins

7.6 Future trends

7.7 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 8: Advances in polymeric materials for modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

Abstract:

8.1 Introduction

8.2 Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

8.3 Physiological factors affecting shelf-life of fresh produce

8.4 Post-harvest pathology of fruits and vegetables

8.5 Response of fresh produce to modified atmosphere packaging

8.6 Polymeric films for application in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

8.7 Cellulose-based plastics

8.8 Biodegradable polymers

8.9 Multilayer plastic films

8.10 Gas permeation or gas transmission

8.11 Water vapor permeability

8.12 Packaging systems in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

8.13 Advanced technology for efficient modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

8.14 Package management

8.15 Design of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP)

8.16 Mathematical modeling of gaseous exchange in modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) systems

8.17 Current application of polymeric films for modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) of fruits and vegetables

8.18 Future trends

Chapter 9: Nylon-MXD6 resins for food packaging

Abstract:

9.1 Structure and general overview

9.2 Processing

9.3 Gas barrier properties

9.4 Other properties

9.5 Applications

9.6 Nylon-MXD6 nanocomposites

9.7 Future trends

Chapter 10: Ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymers

Abstract:

10.1 Introduction

10.2 Structure and general properties of ethylene–vinyl alcohol (EVOH) copolymers

10.3 Ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) versus aliphatic polyketones

10.4 Processing in packaging

10.5 Improving retorting of ethylene–vinyl alcohol (EVOH)

10.6 Nanocomposites of ethylene-vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVOH)

10.7 Future trends

Chapter 11: High barrier plastics using nanoscale inorganic films

Abstract:

11.1 Introduction

11.2 Nanotechnologies of thin films for advanced food packaging

11.3 Thin film technologies for polymer coating using vacuum processes

11.4 Physical vapour deposition (PVD) processes

11.5 Inorganic thin film systems

11.6 Functional properties of diffusion barrier coated polymers

11.7 Future trends

Chapter 12: Functional barriers against migration for food packaging

Abstract:

12.1 Introduction

12.2 Food safety issues related to migration

12.3 Functional barriers

12.4 Nanostrategies for functional barriers

12.5 Future trends

12.6 Sources of further information and advice

Part III: Active and bioactive plastics

Chapter 13: Silver-based antimicrobial polymers for food packaging

Abstract:

13.1 Introduction

13.2 Incorporation of silver into coatings and polymer matrices

13.3 Antimicrobial silver in food packaging

13.4 Future trends

13.5 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 14: Incorporation of chemical antimicrobial agents into polymeric films for food packaging

Abstract:

14.1 Introduction

14.2 Antimicrobial agents

14.3 Chemical antimicrobial agents

14.4 Natural antimicrobial agents

14.5 Polymers (synthetic or natural)

14.6 Nano-antimicrobial agents

14.7 Antimicrobial films and coatings

14.8 Antimicrobial activity

14.9 Future trends

14.11 Appendix: Abbreviations

Chapter 15: Natural extracts in plastic food packaging

Abstract:

15.1 Introduction

15.2 Natural plant extracts as antimicrobials and antioxidants

15.3 Designing active plastic packaging systems from natural plant extracts

15.4 Packaging films based on natural extracts

15.5 Factors to consider in designing active systems

15.6 Future trends

Chapter 16: Bioactive food packaging strategies

Abstract:

16.1 Introduction

16.2 Definition and technologies

16.3 Nanotechnologies

16.4 Controlled release of bioactives

16.5 Future trends

Part IV: Nanotechnology in sustainable plastics for food packaging

Chapter 17: Polylactic acid (PLA) nanocomposites for food packaging applications

Abstract:

17.1 Introduction and properties of polylactic acid (PLA)

17.2 Nanobiocomposites of polylactic acid (PLA) for monolayer packaging

17.3 Future trends

Chapter 18: Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) for food packaging

Abstract:

18.1 Introduction

18.2 Commercial developments

18.3 Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) and their nanocomposite films

18.4 Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) foams and paper coatings

18.5 Conclusions

18.6 Future trends

18.7 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 19: Starch-based polymers for food packaging

Abstract:

19.1 Introduction

19.2 Market for starch-based materials and potential applications

19.3 Structure and properties of native and plasticized starch

19.4 Processing in packaging

19.5 Mechanical and barrier performance of starch-based systems

19.6 Nanocomposites

19.7 Future trends

19.8 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 20: Chitosan polysaccharide in food packaging applications

Abstract:

20.1 Introduction

20.2 Structure and properties

20.3 Processing in packaging

20.4 Antimicrobial chitosan

20.5 Barrier performance

20.6 Nanocomposites

20.7 Future trends

Chapter 21: Carrageenan polysaccharides for food packaging

Abstract:

21.1 Introduction

21.2 Structure and properties of carrageenan

21.3 Processing in packaging

21.4 Barrier performance

21.5 Nanocomposites

Chapter 22: Protein-based resins for food packaging

Abstract:

22.1 Materials (sources, extraction, structure and properties)

22.2 Structure and properties

22.3 Packaging materials characterization (barrier performance, mechanical properties)

22.4 Applications

22.5 Future trends

Chapter 23: Wheat gluten (WG)-based materials for food packaging

Abstract:

23.1 Introduction

23.2 Preparation of wheat gluten-based materials

23.3 Mechanical and barrier properties of wheat gluten-based materials

23.4 Wheat gluten-based nanocomposites

23.5 Example of integrated approach for the packaging of fresh fruits and vegetables

23.6 Future trends

Chapter 24: Safety and regulatory aspects of plastics as food packaging materials

Abstract:

24.1 Introduction

24.2 Indirect food additives

24.3 Nanotechnology in food contact materials

24.4 Migration of additives

24.5 Indian Standards for overall migration (IS:9845-1998)

24.6 US Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)

24.7 European Commission Directives on plastic containers for foods

24.8 Specific migration of toxic additives

24.9 Recent problems in specific migration

24.10 Future trends

24.12 Appendix: Abbreviations

Index

Details

No. of pages:
736
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2011
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857092786
Hardcover ISBN:
9781845697389
Paperback ISBN:
9780081017074

About the Editor

José-María Lagarón

Professor Jose-Maria Lagarón is group leader and founder of the group Novel Materials and Nanotechnology at the Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology (IATA) of the Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC) in Spain. He is renowned for work on the development of eco-sustainable food packaging based on polymer nanomaterials.

Affiliations and Expertise

Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Spain