Monitoring Vertebrate Populations

1st Edition

Print ISBN: 9780123992628
eBook ISBN: 9780080536941
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 23rd July 1998
Page Count: 365
132.00 + applicable tax
80.00 + applicable tax
99.95 + applicable tax
124.00 + applicable tax
Compatible Not compatible
VitalSource PC, Mac, iPhone & iPad Amazon Kindle eReader
ePub & PDF Apple & PC desktop. Mobile devices (Apple & Android) Amazon Kindle eReader
Mobi Amazon Kindle eReader Anything else

Institutional Access


This book is written to serve as a general reference for biologists and resource managers with relatively little statistical training. It focuses on both basic concepts and practical applications to provide professionals with the tools needed to assess monitoring methods that can detect trends in populations. It combines classical finite population sampling designs with population enumeration procedures in a unified approach for obtaining abundance estimates for species of interest. The statistical information is presented in practical, easy-to-understand terminology.

Key Features

@introbul:Key Features @bul:* Presented in practical, easy-to-understand terminology

  • Serves as a general reference for biologists and resource managers
  • Provides the tools needed to detect trends in populations
  • Introduces a unified approach for obtaining abundance estimates


Advanced undergraduates, graduate students, faculty and staff with interests in wildlife biology, conservation, ecology, and fishery science. Labs and federal agencies.

Table of Contents

Preface. Basic Concepts. Sampling Designs and Related Topics. Enumeration Methods. Community Surveys. Detection of a Trend in Population Estimates. Guidelines for Planning Surveys. Fish. Amphibians and Reptiles. Birds. Mammals. Glossary of Terms. Glossary of Notation. Sampling Estimators. Common and Scientific Names of Cited Vertebrates. Subject Index.


No. of pages:
© Academic Press 1998
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
Hardcover ISBN:
Paperback ISBN:


@qu:"...a most welcome addition. Thompson, White, and Gowan have written a valuable book, one certainly to be referred to by those following trends in species inventory and monitoring programs. The book offers a great deal to take in, a great many lessons that need to be delivered. Monitoring Vertebrate Populations should be required reading for administrators and resource managers before they undertake funding and program planning. I recommend it." @source:--C. Kenneth Dodd in COPEIA (1999) @qu:"...will enable the wildlife biologist/manager, natural resource administrator, or policy make to better evaluate research concerning the status of wildlife populations. For the statistically impaired or statisiphobics among us, it offers hope and a lighted path toward meaningful data gathering and analysis. It will no doubt earn a place among your most useful professional tests on your workshelf." @source:--Bruce B. Davit in JOURNAL OF RANGE MANAGEMENT (January 1999)