Molecular Biology of B Cells

1st Edition

Editors: Tasuku Honjo Michael Reth Andreas Radbruch Frederick Alt Tasuku Honjo Michael Neuberger
Hardcover ISBN: 9780120536412
eBook ISBN: 9780080479507
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 18th February 2003
Page Count: 600
140.00 + applicable tax
230.00 + applicable tax
175.00 + applicable tax
215.00 + applicable tax
Unavailable
Compatible Not compatible
VitalSource PC, Mac, iPhone & iPad Amazon Kindle eReader
ePub & PDF Apple & PC desktop. Mobile devices (Apple & Android) Amazon Kindle eReader
Mobi Amazon Kindle eReader Anything else

Institutional Access


Description

Molecular Biology of B Cells is a comprehensive reference to how B cells are generated, selected, activated and engaged in antibody production. All these developmental and stimulatory processes are described in molecular and genetic terms to give a clear understanding of complex phenotyes. The molecular basis of many diseases due to B cell abnormality is also discussed. This definitive reference is directed at research level immunologists, molecular biologists and geneticists.

Readership

Research level immunologists, molecular biologists and geneticists

Table of Contents

ORGANIZATION, REARRANGEMENT AND TRANSCRIPTION OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN GENES Human Immunoglobulin heavy chains locus Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes of mouse Immunoglobulin ? genes of human and mouse Immunoglobulin lambdav (IGL) genes of human and mouse The Mechanism of V(D) J Recombination Transcription of Immunoglobulin genes

B CELLS AND THEIR DEVELOPMENT Early B cell development to a mature , antigen-sensitive cell - cellular stages and molecular decisions Allelic exclusion, Isotypic exclusion and the Developmental Regulation of V(D)J Recombination The Development of Human B Lymphocytes Development and function of B cell subsets

B CELL DIFFERENTIATION INDUCED BY Ag STIMULATION Structure and function of B cells antigen receptor complexes Regulation of antigen receptor signaling by the co-receptors, CD19 and CD22 The dynamic structure of antibody responses Dynamics of B cell migration to and within secondary lymphoid organs Characteristics of mucosal B cells with emphasis on the human secretory immune system The Cellular Basis of B Cell Memory Immunoglobulin assembly and secretion Fc And Complement Receptors

Ig GENE ALTERATION IN PERIPHERY Regulation of Class Switch Recombination Molecular Mechanism of Class Switch Recombination Molecular Mechanism of Hypermutation Selection During Antigen-Driven B Cell Immune Responses: The Basis for High Affinity Antibody

DISEASES OF B CELLS Chromosomal Translocations in B-cell Leukemias and Lymphomas Classification and Characteristics of

Details

No. of pages:
600
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2003
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780080479507
Hardcover ISBN:
9780120536412

About the Editor

Tasuku Honjo

Dr. Tasuku Honjo graduated from Kyoto University Faculty of Medicine in 1966 (M.D.). After obtaining his Ph.D. in Biochimistry (Dr. O. Hayaishi), he spent 4 years in the U.S.A. as a postdoctoral fellow first in Carnegie Institution of Washington (Dr. D. Brown), and then in NIH (Dr. P. Leder) where he initiated studies on immunoglobulin genes. He returned to Tokyo University as an assistant professor in 1974, and then moved to Osaka University School of Medicine as Professor of Genetics in 1979. He succeeded to Dr. O. Hayaishi after his retirement at the Department of Medical Chemistry in Kyoto University. He also served as Dean of Medical School (1996-2000 and 2004-2005), and Executive Member of Council for Science and Technology Policy, Cabinet Office (2006-2012). Currently, he is Professor of Department of Immunology and Genomic Medicine, Kyoto University, and also Chairman of Board of Directors, Shizuoka Prefectural University Corporation. Dr. Honjo is well known for his discovery of activation-induced cytidine deaminase that is essential for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. He has established the basic conceptual framework of class switch recombination starting from discovery of DNA deletion (1978) and S regions (1980), followed by elucidation of the whole mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus. His contribution further extended to cDNA cloning of IL-4 and IL-5 cytokines involved in class switching and IL-2 receptor alpha chain. Aside from class switching recombination, he discovered PD-1 (program cell death 1), a negative coreceptor at the effector phase of immune response and showed that PD-1 modulation contributes to treatments of viral infection, tumor and autoimmunity. In addition, he is known to be a discoverer of RBP-J, a nuclear protein that interacts with the intracellular domain of Notch in the nucleus. Notch/RBP-J signaling has been shown to regulate a variety of cell lineage commitment including T and B cells. For these con

Affiliations and Expertise

Kyoto University, Japan

Michael Reth

Prof. Dr Michael Reth has won the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize, awarded by the Paul Ehrlich Foundation, for his research on the immune system. For the first time since 1996, the prize goes to a scientist working in Germany. Dr Reth is Professor for Molecular Immunology at the Institute of Biology III of the University of Freiburg and Scientific Director of the Cluster of Excellence BIOSS, Centre for Biological Signalling Studies. He is also head of the department for Molecular Immunology at the Max Planck Institute of Immunobiology and Epigenetics (MPI-IE). The prize is endowed with €100,000 and is one of the highest honours in science in Germany. By awarding the prize to Dr Reth, the Foundation has chosen to honour a scientist who, like Nobel laureate Paul Ehrlich, decodes how immunity operates at a molecular level, in order to find new therapies for cancer and infectious diseases. “This award is a great honour for me, because I deeply admire Paul Ehrlich’s work in immunology,” Dr Reth said. “He was one of the first scientists to consider the molecular level in this field.” Following Ehrlich’s scientific tradition, Dr Reth chose to focus his research on how the human body recognises foreign substances. “Due to the success of vaccinations, which was one of the greatest achievements in medicine, immunology has been an applied science from the beginning. However, we still do not fully understand the processes that underlie immunisation,” Dr Reth remarks. That is why his research revolves around the B cell component of the immune system. When activated, these blood cells produce antibodies to fight off infection. Dr Reth investigates the structure and organisation of the B cell antigen receptors. These molecules on the surface of B cells recognise foreign substances, so-called antigens, and trigger the activation of the immune system. Dr Reth was able to describe the basic structure of the antigen receptor of B cells for the first time in 1989. Tog

Affiliations and Expertise

Albert-Ludwigs University Freiburg, Germany

Andreas Radbruch

Andreas Radbruch did his PhD at the Genetics Institute of the Cologne University, Germany, with Klaus Rajewsky. He later became Associate Professor there and was a visiting scientist with Max Cooper and John Kearney at the University of Alabama, Birmingham. In 1996, he became Director of the German Rheumatism Research Centre Berlin, a Leibniz Institute, and in 1998, Professor of Rheumatology at the Charité, the Medical Faculty of the Humboldt University of Berlin. A biologist by education, Andreas Radbruch early on worked on somatic variants in myeloma and hybridoma cells lines, modeling antibody class switching and somatic hypermutation. In this context, his lab originally developed the MACS technology. Andreas Radbruch then showed that recombination is the physiological mechanism of class switching in vivo, in plasmablasts isolated ex vivo. Moreover, he could show that in vivo, class switch recombination is targeted to the same Ig class on both IgH loci of a cell, reflecting a tight control of targeting of recombination. An essential element of this control is transcription of recombinogenic sequences, and the processing of these switch (germline) transcripts, as became evident from targeted deletion of the control regions involved. The switch transcripts are induced by cytokines of T helper cells, e.g. interleukin-4. The Radbruch lab contributed essentially to our current understanding of the polarization and imprinting of T helper cells expressing interleukin-4 (Th2) versus those expressing interferon- (Th1). The lab then addressed the organization of immunological memory as such. First they identified longlived (memory) plasma cells, mostly residing in bone marrow but also in secondary lymphoid organs and in inflamed tissues. They could show that these cells individually persist in dedicated survival niches, organized by CXCL12-expressing mesenchymal stroma cells. They identified different, dedicated niches for CD4+ and CD8+ memory T cells in the bone mar

Affiliations and Expertise

Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum, Germany

Frederick Alt

Frederick Alt received his Ph.D. in Biology from Stanford University in 1977 where he worked with Robert Schimke and discovered gene amplification and genomic instability in mammalian cancer cells. Alt moved to MIT for postdoctoral work with David Baltimore, where he helped elucidate basic principles of recombination in the immune system. His work with Baltimore included the discovery that production of membrane versus secreted immunoglobulin is achieved via differential RNA processing and the discovery that allelic exclusion of Immunoglobulin (Ig) gene rearrangements is controlled by feedback from protein products. With Baltimore, Alt also elucidated major aspects of the V(D)J recombination mechanism, including involvement of site-specific DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that are end joined, and the discovery of ”N” regions, which represent a major source of antigen receptor diversity. Dr. Alt moved to Columbia University in 1982 as Assistant Professor of Biochemistry. He became Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics in 1985 and HHMI Investigator in 1987. At Columbia, he established the role of Ig chains in regulating B cell development and discovered that antigen receptor genes are assembled by a common V(D)J recombinase. He then elucidated a role for non-coding gene transcription and "chromatin accessibility" as means to target the lineage, stage, and allele specific activity of the V(D)J recombinase. He extended that work to show that IgH class switch recombination (CSR) is B cells to particular IgH classes is directed by activation of non-coding transcription units that contain the CSR target sequences. At Columbia, he also discovered N-myc, based on its amplification in human neuroblastomas and he characterized the Myc cellular oncogene family. In 1991, Dr. Alt moved to Boston Children' Hospital (BCH) and Harvard Medical School as a Professor of Genetics and HHMI Investigator. He also became a Senior Investigator at the Immune Di

Affiliations and Expertise

Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Tasuku Honjo

Dr. Tasuku Honjo graduated from Kyoto University Faculty of Medicine in 1966 (M.D.). After obtaining his Ph.D. in Biochimistry (Dr. O. Hayaishi), he spent 4 years in the U.S.A. as a postdoctoral fellow first in Carnegie Institution of Washington (Dr. D. Brown), and then in NIH (Dr. P. Leder) where he initiated studies on immunoglobulin genes. He returned to Tokyo University as an assistant professor in 1974, and then moved to Osaka University School of Medicine as Professor of Genetics in 1979. He succeeded to Dr. O. Hayaishi after his retirement at the Department of Medical Chemistry in Kyoto University. He also served as Dean of Medical School (1996-2000 and 2004-2005), and Executive Member of Council for Science and Technology Policy, Cabinet Office (2006-2012). Currently, he is Professor of Department of Immunology and Genomic Medicine, Kyoto University, and also Chairman of Board of Directors, Shizuoka Prefectural University Corporation. Dr. Honjo is well known for his discovery of activation-induced cytidine deaminase that is essential for class switch recombination and somatic hypermutation. He has established the basic conceptual framework of class switch recombination starting from discovery of DNA deletion (1978) and S regions (1980), followed by elucidation of the whole mouse immunoglobulin heavy-chain locus. His contribution further extended to cDNA cloning of IL-4 and IL-5 cytokines involved in class switching and IL-2 receptor alpha chain. Aside from class switching recombination, he discovered PD-1 (program cell death 1), a negative coreceptor at the effector phase of immune response and showed that PD-1 modulation contributes to treatments of viral infection, tumor and autoimmunity. In addition, he is known to be a discoverer of RBP-J, a nuclear protein that interacts with the intracellular domain of Notch in the nucleus. Notch/RBP-J signaling has been shown to regulate a variety of cell lineage commitment including T and B cells. For these con

Affiliations and Expertise

Kyoto University, Japan

Michael Neuberger

Affiliations and Expertise

Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology