Modeling Neuropsychiatric Disorders in Laboratory Animals - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081000991, 9780081001066

Modeling Neuropsychiatric Disorders in Laboratory Animals

1st Edition

Authors: Kurt Hoffman
eBook ISBN: 9780081001066
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081000991
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 15th September 2015
Page Count: 324
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Description

Modeling Neuropsychiatric Disorders in Laboratory Animals serves as a guide for students and basic investigators in the fields of behavioral sciences, psychology, neuroscience, psychiatry, and other professionals interested in the use of animal models in preclinical research related to human neuropsychiatric disorders.

The text focuses on the rationale and theory of using animal behavior, both pathological and normal, as a tool for understanding the neural underpinnings of neuropsychiatric disorders. Chapters contain discussions on both classical and modern views on the validation of animal models for neuropsychiatric disorders, also discussing the utility of endophenotypes in modeling neuropsychiatric disease.

Subsequent chapters deal with four specific classes of disorders, including anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Final sections discuss the future for the development, validation, and use of animal models in basic and preclinical research.

Key Features

  • Focuses on the rationale and theory of using animal behavior, both pathological and normal, as a tool for understanding the neural underpinnings of neuropsychiatric disorders
  • Serves as a guide for students and basic investigators in the fields of behavioral sciences, psychology, neuroscience, psychiatry, and other professionals
  • Discusses specific classes of disorders, including anxiety disorders, depressive disorders, obsessive-compulsive and related disorders

Readership

This book is aimed mainly at students (including young investigators beginning a career in preclinical research involving animal models). However, it would also be useful for psychiatrists to better understand and interpret preclinical studies involving animal models.

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • Introduction
  • About the author
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: What is an animal model of a neuropsychiatric disorder?
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 What is a neuropsychiatric disorder? (and what is not?)
    • 1.3 What is an animal model of a neuropsychiatric disorder?
    • 1.4 General types of animal models
    • 1.5 Animal model or model animal?
    • 1.6 Validating an animal model
    • 1.7 Endophenotypes and biologic markers
    • 1.8 Chapter overview and perspectives
  • 2: What can animal models tell us about depressive disorders?
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Depressive disorders
    • 2.2 Neurobiology of depressive disorders
    • 2.3 Relationship to normalcy
    • 2.4 Endophenotypes of depressive disorders
    • 2.5 Gene variants associated with depression
    • 2.6 Measuring endophenotypes in rodent models
    • 2.7 Animal models
    • 2.8 Model animals
    • 2.9 Chapter overview and perspectives
  • 3: Modeling disorders of fear and anxiety in animals
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Anxiety disorders
    • 3.2 Neurobiology of anxiety disorders
    • 3.3 Relationship to normalcy
    • 3.4 Endophenotypes of anxiety disorders
    • 3.5 Genes and anxiety
    • 3.6 Measuring endophenotypes in rodent models
    • 3.7 Animal models
    • 3.8 Model animals
    • 3.9 Chapter overview and perspectives
  • 4: Animal models for studying obsessive-compulsive and related disorders
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Obsessive–compulsive and related disorders
    • 4.2 OCD within the internalizing dimension of disorders
    • 4.3 OCD as a multidimensional disorder
    • 4.4 The OCD spectrum of disorders
    • 4.5 Neurobiology of OCD
    • 4.6 Relationship to normalcy
    • 4.7 Endophenotypes of OCD and related disorders
    • 4.8 Genetics of OCD
    • 4.9 Endophenotype tests in rodents
    • 4.10 Animal models
    • 4.11 Model animals
    • 4.12 Chapter overview and perspectives
  • 5: New dimensions in animal modeling of neuropsychiatric disorders
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Comorbidity of mental illness
    • 5.2 Endophenotypes of depression, anxiety disorders, and obsessive–compulsive disorder
    • 5.3 New “dimensions” in animal modeling of neuropsychiatric disorders
    • 5.4 A closer look at the world of rats and mice
    • 5.5 How far can we take cross-species comparisons?
    • 5.6 The importance of the individual
    • 5.7 Some environmental factors that influence the development of stable individual differences
    • 5.8 Chapter overview and perspectives
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
324
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081001066
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081000991

About the Author

Kurt Hoffman

Dr. Hoffman has studied neurobiological processes in a variety of model animals ranging from Manduca sexta (the common tobacco hawkmoth) to the European rabbit. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, and a doctoral degree in Biology from the Institute of Neuroscience at the University of Oregon, Eugene. His research has involved diverse aspects of neurobiology and behavior, including neuronal differentiation and myelination, neuroendocrinology and programmed cell death, reproductive behavior, and animal models for studying obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. Currently, his work focuses on the neurobiological underpinnings of animal behavior – both normal and abnormal – in order to gain a better understanding of the neurobiology of human mental illness.

Affiliations and Expertise

Investigator, Dr. Carlos Beyer Flores Center, Tlaxcala, Mexico and Professor, Postgraduate Program in Biological Sciences, Autonomous University of Tlaxcala, Mexico.