Microbial Iron Metabolism

Microbial Iron Metabolism

A Comprehensive Treatise

1st Edition - January 1, 1974

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  • Editor: J. B. Neilands
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483274812

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Description

Microbial Iron Metabolism: A Comprehensive Treatise provides a comprehensive treatment of microbial iron metabolism. It aims to contribute to an increased understanding of the path of iron in microbial species and, eventually, in the plant and animal. The book is organized into five parts. Part I describes some features of iron and its function in the microbial world. These include a historical sketch of the recognition of the importance of iron in cellular physiology; a description of certain physical properties of ferrous and ferric ions; and a list of various known biocoordination derivatives grouped by ligand atom. Metabolism under iron-limited conditions is also examined. Part II presents studies on iron transport, biosynthesis, and storage in microorganisms. Part III examines iron enzymes and proteins, including ferredoxin, rubredoxin, nitrogenase, and hydrogenase. Part IV deals with reactions of inorganic substrates. Part V presents a study on the role of bacterial iron metabolism in infection and immunity.

Table of Contents


  • List of Contributors

    Preface

    Part I Introduction

    Chapter 1. Iron and Its Role in Microbial Physiology

    I. Introduction

    II. Historical Background

    III. Biogeochemistry of Iron

    IV. Some Physical and Chemical Properties of Iron

    V. Iron Content of Microorganisms

    VI. Iron Ligand Atoms in Microorganisms and Their Function

    VII. Life without Iron and Functional Replacements for Iron

    VIII. Aspects of the Comparative Biochemistry of Iron Metabolism

    References

    Chapter 2. Metabolism in Iron-Limited Growth

    I. Introduction

    II. Iron-Limited Growth

    III. Practical Aspects of Iron Limitation

    IV. Effects of Iron Deficiency and Iron Limitation

    V. Summary

    References

    Part II Transport, Biosynthesis, and Storage

    Chapter 3. Iron Transport in the Enteric Bacteria

    I. Introduction

    II. Iron Transport Systems in Escherichia Coli

    III. Iron Transport Systems in Aerobacter aerogenes

    IV. Iron Transport Systems in Salmonella typhimurium

    V. Discussion

    References

    Chapter 4. Iron Transport in Gram-Positive and Acid-Fast Bacilli

    I. Introduction

    II. Production of Iron-Chelating Agents by Bacillus Species

    III. Iron Transport in Bacillus megaterium

    IV. Iron Transport in Bacillus subtilis

    V. Iron Transport in Mycobactenum smegmatis

    VI. Summary

    References

    Chapter 5. Biosynthesis and Mechanism of Action of Hydroxamate-Type Siderochromes

    I. Introduction

    II. Hadacidin

    III. Ferrichrome

    IV. Rhodotorulic Acid

    V. Aspergillic Acid

    VI. Mycobactin

    VII. Regulation of Hydroxamate Synthesis

    VIII. Hydroxamate Acids and Iron Transport

    References

    Chapter 6. Biosynthesis of Heme

    I. Introduction

    II. Heme Content of Various Microorganisms

    III. Pathway of Heme Synthesis

    IV. Regulation of Microbial Heme Biosynthesis

    References

    Chapter 7. Ferritin and Iron Metabolism in Phycomyces

    I. Introduction

    II. Purification and Properties of Phycomyces Ferritin

    III. Induction of Ferritin Synthesis by Iron

    IV. Ferritin Synthesis and Localization in Spores

    V. Ferritin and Iron Metabolism in Germinating Spores

    VI. Summary

    References

    Part III Iron Enzymes and Proteins

    Chapter 8. Ferredoxin and Rubredoxin

    I. Introduction

    II. Historical Background

    III. Biological Roles

    IV. Chemical Properties of Iron-Sulfur Proteins

    V. Some General Thoughts about Iron-Sulfur Electron Carriers

    References

    Chapter 9. Survey of Nitrogenase and Its EPR Properties

    I. Introduction

    II. Isolation and Purification of Nitrogenase Components

    III. Physicochemical Properties of Nitrogenase Components

    IV. Catalytic Activity of Nitrogenase

    V. EPR Studies of Nitrogenase and its Components

    VI. Mechanism of N2 Reduction

    References

    Chapter 10. The Nitrogen Fixation (Nif) Operon(s) of Klebsiella pneumoniae

    I. Introduction

    II. The Cluster of Nif Genes Near His

    III. Biochemical Evidence for Nitrogenase Genes Near His

    IV. Nif- Mutations Unlinked to His

    V. Genetic Regulation of Nif

    VI. Transfer of Nif to E. coli and Potential for Genetic Engineering

    References

    Chapter 11. Hydrogenase

    I. Background

    II. Distribution of Hydrogenase

    III. Role of Hydrogenase in Microbial Metabolism

    IV. Nutritional Studies on Hydrogen Metabolism

    V. Assays of Hydrogenase

    VI. Purification and Properties of Hydrogenase

    VII. Mechanism of Hydrogenase Catalysis

    References

    Chapter 12. Glutamate Synthase

    I. Introduction

    II. Discovery

    III. Distribution

    IV. Regulation of Glutamate Synthase Levels

    V. Mutants Lacking Glutamate Synthase

    VI. Kinetic Parameters

    VII. Glutamate Synthesis from E. coli

    VIII. Conclusions

    References

    Chapter 13. Nonheme Iron in Respiratory Chains

    I. Introduction

    II. Methodology for Study of Respiratory Chain-Linked Nonheme Iron

    III. Nonheme Iron in Respiratory Chains of Eukaryotic Cells

    IV. Nonheme Iron in Respiratory Chains of Prokaryotic Cells

    References

    Chapter 14. Cytochromes

    I. General Survey

    II. Cytochrome A and Cytochrome Oxidase

    III. Cytochrome B

    IV. Cytochrome C

    V. Heme D-Bearing Cytochrome

    References

    Chapter 15. Hydroperoxidases

    I. Introduction

    II. Yeast Cytochrome C Peroxidase

    III. Pseudomonas Cytochrome c Peroxidase

    IV. Thiobacillus Cytochrome c Peroxidase

    V. Bacterial Catalases

    VI. General Discussion

    References

    Chapter 16. Oxygenases

    I. Introduction

    II. Historical Background

    III. Nomenclature and Classification

    IV. Nonheme Iron-Containing Monooxygenases

    V. Nonheme Iron-Containing Dioxygenases

    VI. Heme-Containing Oxygenases

    VII. Concluding Remarks

    References

    Chapter 17. Other Iron-Containing or Iron-Activated Enzymes: Enzymes Acting on Certain Amino Acids, Amines, and Acetyl Phosphate

    I. Introduction

    II. Lysine 2,3-Aminomutase

    III. L-Serine Dehydratase

    IV. Sarcosine Dehydrogenase

    V. Spermidine Dehydrogenase

    VI. Phosphotransacetylase

    References

    Part IV Reactions of Inorganic Substrates

    Chapter 18. The Iron-Oxidizing Bacteria

    I. Introduction

    II. Cultural Characteristics

    III. Iron Oxidation and Energy Production

    IV. Inorganic Sulfur Oxidation

    V. Carbon Dioxide Fixation

    VI. Heterotrophic Metabolism

    References

    Chapter 19. Microbial Corrosion of Iron

    I. Historical Background

    II. Economic Significance

    III. Principles of Corrosion

    IV. Microorganisms Involved in Corrosion of Iron

    V. Mechanisms of Microbial Corrosion

    VI. Prevention of Biological Corrosion

    References

    Part V Medicine and Chemotherapy

    Chapter 20. Bacterial Iron Metabolism in Infection and Immunity

    I. Introduction

    II. The Effects of Iron-Binding Proteins on Bacteria and Fungi In Vivo and In Vitro

    III. Clinical Aspects of Altered Iron Metabolism and Infection

    IV. The Interaction between Bacteria and Iron-Binding Proteins

    V. The Effects of Antibody and Iron-Binding Proteins on Bacterial Metabolism

    VI. Summary

    References

    Author Index

    Subject Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 616
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 1974
  • Published: January 1, 1974
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483274812

About the Editor

J. B. Neilands

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