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Microbial Forensics - 3rd Edition - ISBN: 9780128153796, 9780128153802

Microbial Forensics

3rd Edition

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Editors: Bruce Budowle Steven Schutzer Stephen Morse
eBook ISBN: 9780128153802
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128153796
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 3rd December 2019
Page Count: 526
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Description

Microbial Forensics, Third Edition, serves as a complete reference on the discipline, describing the advances, challenges and opportunities that are integral in applying science to help solve future biocrimes. New chapters include: Microbial Source Tracking, Clinical Recognition, Bioinformatics, and Quality Assurance. This book is intended for a wide audience, but will be indispensable to forensic scientists and researchers interested in contributing to the growing field of microbial forensics. Biologists and microbiologists, the legal and judicial system, and the international community involved with Biological Weapons Treaties will also find this volume invaluable.

Key Features

  • Presents new and expanded content that includes a statistical analysis of forensic data, legal admissibility and standards of evidence
  • Discusses actual cases of forensic bioterrorism
  • Includes contributions from editors and authors who are leading experts in the field, with primary experience in the application of this fast-growing discipline

Readership

Forensic scientists, researchers and practitioners in microbial forensics laboratories. Microbiology researchers; attorneys, law enforcement and intelligence communities; post-graduate students of forensic science and the international community involved with Biological Weapons Treaties

Table of Contents

  1. The Kameido anthrax incident: a microbial forensic case study
    ARNOLD F. KAUFMANN AND PAUL KEIM
    2. The FBI’s Amerithrax Task Force and the advent of microbial forensics
    R. SCOTT DECKER AND TERRY L. KERNS
    3. Microbial forensic investigation of the anthrax letter attacks: how the investigation would differ using today’s technologies
    PAUL J. JACKSON
    4. Foodborne outbreaks
    E.W. BROWN AND M.W. ALLARD
    5. Forensic plant pathology
    JACQUELINE FLETCHER, NEEL G. BARNABY, JAMES BURANS, ULRICH MELCHER, DOUGLAS G. LUSTER, FORREST W. NUTTER, JR., HARALD SCHERM, DAVID G. SCHMALE, III, CARLA S. THOMAS, AND FRANCISCO M. OCHOA CORONA
    6. Microbial source tracking: characterization of human fecal pollution in environmental waters with HF183 quantitative real-time PCR
    ORIN C. SHANKS AND ASJA KORAJKIC
    7. Influenza forensics
    ANGELA CHOI AND ADOLFO GARCÍA-SASTRE
    8. Forensic public health: epidemiological and microbiological investigations for biosecurity
    ALI S. KHAN, PHILIP S. AMARA, AND STEPHEN A. MORSE
    9. Forensic analysis in bacterial pathogens
    PAUL KEIM, JASON W. SAHL, TALIMA PEARSON, AMY VOGLER, CHARLES H. WILLIAMSON, DAWN BIRDSELL, RICHARD T. OKINAKA, JEFFREY T. FOSTER, AND DAVID M. WAGNER
    10. Genomic epidemiology and forensics of fungal pathogens
    DAVID M. ENGELTHALER AND ANASTASIA P. LITVINTSEVA
    11. Forensic human identification using skin microbiome genetic signatures
    SARAH E. SCHMEDES, AUGUST WOERNER, AND BRUCE BUDOWLE
    12. Using microbiome tools for estimating the postmortem interval
    HEATHER DEEL, SIBYL BUCHELI, AERIEL BELK, SAM OGDEN, AARON LYNNE, DAVID O. CARTER, ROB KNIGHT, AND JESSICA L. METCALF
    13. Select methods for microbial forensic nucleic acid analysis of trace and uncultivable specimens
    RACHEL E. KIESER AND BRUCE BUDOWLE
    14. The use of host factors in microbial forensics
    STEVEN E. SCHUTZER
    15. Toxin analysis using mass spectrometry
    THOMAS A. BLAKE, SUZANNE R. KALB, RUDOLPH C. JOHNSON, AND JOHN R. BARR
    16. Ricin forensics: comparisons to microbial forensics
    JEFFREY T. FOSTER, ROBERT L. BULL, AND PAUL KEIM
    17. Proteomics for bioforensics
    ERIC D. MERKLEY, BROOKE L. DEATHERAGE KAISER, DAVID S. WUNSCHEL, AND KAREN L. WAHL
    18. Rapid bacterial typing in the postgenomic era: developments in computational methods
    HECTOR F. ESPITIA-NAVARRO, LAVANYA RISHISHWAR, LEONARD W. MAYER, AND I. KING JORDAN
    19. Genomics
    TOM SLEZAK, JONATHAN ALLEN, AND CRYSTAL JAING
    20. Design of genomic signatures for pathogen identification and characterization
    TOM SLEZAK, BRADLEY HART, AND CRYSTAL JAING
    21. Collection and preservation of microbial forensic samples
    JENIFER A.L. SMITH
    22. Assessment of the threat
    JENIFER A.L. SMITH AND DAVID R. HODGE
    23. Scientific testimonial standards for microbial forensic evidence
    STEPHAN P. VELSKO
    24. Inferential validation and evidence interpretation
    STEPHAN P. VELSKO
    25. Microbial forensic investigations in the context of bacterial population genetics
    PAUL KEIM, TALIMA PEARSON, BRUCE BUDOWLE, MARK WILSON, AND DAVID M. WAGNER
    26. Use of microbial forensics data in scientific, legal, and policy contexts
    CHRISTOPHER A. BIDWELL AND RANDALL MURCH
    27. Lessons for expert witnesses
    STEPHEN A. SALTZBURG
    28. Select agent regulations
    STEPHEN A. MORSE AND BERNARD R. QUIGLEY
    29. Biorepositories and their foundation
    FRANK P. SIMIONE, RICHARD R. VINES, AND TED D. MULLINS
    30. The National Bioforensic Analysis Center
    JAMES BURANS, JENNIFER S. GOODRICH, ROBERT L. BULL, AND NICHOLAS H. BERGMAN
    31. An international microbial forensics research strategy and its collaborative pursuit is needed
    RANDALL MURCH AND BRUCE BUDOWLE
    32. Education and training in microbial forensics
    STEVEN B. LEE, DEETTA K. MILLS, STEPHEN A. MORSE, STEVEN E. SCHUTZER, BRUCE BUDOWLE, AND PAUL KEIM
    33. Microbial forensics: what next?
    STEPHEN A. MORSE, BRUCE BUDOWLE, AND STEVEN E. SCHUTZER

Details

No. of pages:
526
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2020
Published:
3rd December 2019
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128153802
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128153796

About the Editors

Bruce Budowle

Dr. Budowle has a lengthy CV and career. Some of his efforts over the last 15 years also are in counter terrorism, including identification of victims from mass disasters and in efforts involving microbial forensics and bioterrorism. Dr. Budowle was an advisor to New York State in the effort to identify the victims from the WTC attack. In the area of microbial forensics, Dr. Budowle has been the chair of the Scientific Working Group on Microbial Genetics and Forensics, whose mission was to set QA guidelines, develop criteria for biologic and user databases, set criteria for a National Repository, and develop forensic genomic applications. He also has served on the Steering Committee for the Colloquium on Microbial Forensics sponsored by American Society of Microbiology, an organizer of four Microbial Forensics Meetings held at The Banbury Center in the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, and on steering committees for NAS sponsored meetings. Dr. Budowle has published approximately 600 articles, made more than 720 presentations (many of which were as an invited speaker at national and international meetings), and testified in well over 250 criminal cases in the areas of molecular biology, population genetics, statistics, quality assurance, and forensic biology. In addition, he has authored or co-authored books on molecular biology techniques, electrophoresis, protein detection, and microbial forensics.

Affiliations and Expertise

Center for Human Identification, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Genetics, University of North Texas Health Science Center, Ft Worth, TX, USA

Steven Schutzer

Steven Schutzer, MD is a physician-scientist who trained and was on the faculty at Cornell University Medical College, New York Hospital, and Rockefeller University, before joining New Jersey Medical School. His research has focused on the interface of the immune system and microbes. Particular areas of research interest are Lyme and Tick diseases, neuroimmunology, and immunology. Dr. Schutzer is board certified in Internal Medicine, Allergy and Clinical Immunology, and Clinical Laboratory Immunology. Dr. Schutzer’s research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and other organizations.

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Medicine, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, USA

Stephen Morse

Dr. Morse attended graduate school at the School of Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he received his M.S.P.H. (’66) in environmental chemistry and biology and a Ph.D. (’69) in microbiology. In 1984, he joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as Director of the Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) Research Program, National Center for Infectious Diseases (NCID); and in 1996, became the Associate Director for Science of the newly created Division of AIDS, STDs and Tuberculosis Laboratory Research. From 1999 - 2007, he served as the Associate Director for Science, Division of Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response where he worked on national and international bioterrorism-related issues. In 2008, he became the Associate Director for Environmental Microbiology, CDC. He has published 325 peer reviewed articles, books and chapters.

Affiliations and Expertise

National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA

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