Metabolic Phenotyping in Personalized and Public Healthcare - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128003442, 9780128004142

Metabolic Phenotyping in Personalized and Public Healthcare

1st Edition

Editors: Jeremy Nicholson Ara Darzi Elaine Holmes John C. Lindon
eBook ISBN: 9780128004142
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128003442
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 16th February 2016
Page Count: 428
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out
99.95
84.99
139.95
Unavailable
File Compatibility per Device

PDF, EPUB, VSB (Vital Source):
PC, Apple Mac, iPhone, iPad, Android mobile devices.

Mobi:
Amazon Kindle eReader.

Institutional Access


Description

Metabolic Phenotyping in Personalized and Public Healthcare provides information on the widespread recognition that a personalized or stratified approach to patient treatment may offer a more efficient and effective healthcare solution than phenotype-led approaches.

In order to achieve that objective, a deep personal description is required at the level of the genome, proteome, metabolome, or preferably a combination of these aided by technology. This book, edited and written by the outstanding luminaries of this evolving field, evaluates metabolic profiling and its uses across personalized and population healthcare, while also covering the advent of new technology fields, such as surgical metabonomics.

In addition, the text presents specific examples of where this technology has been used clinically and with efficacy, pointing towards a framework and protocol for usage as it hits the clinical mainstream.

Key Features

  • Translates the conjunction of new surgical tools for intraoperative, real-time, metabolite evaluation and direct analysis of biofluid samples into novel options for augmented clinical decision-making
  • Discusses longitudinal sampling from individual patients for stratified medicine
  • Covers high resolution analytical spectroscopy and sophisticated computational modelling for prediction of adverse reactions in critical care scenarios, prognostic evaluation of cancer from biofluidism, and prognostic prediction of metabolism or response of patients to pharmaceutical interventions
  • Encapsulates recent technology options for broader population profiling considerations, in particular, the metabolome-wide association studies (MWAS) that aid the translational researcher in identifying metabolic patterns associated with disease
  • Foreword written by Professor Dame Sally Davies who is the Chief Medical Officer for England

 

Readership

Principally genomics and metabolomics researchers, translational biologists, bioanalytical chemists, biochemists, related clinicians, and anyone more broadly interested in systems-level approaches, whether in systems biology, biotechnology, toxicology or pharmaceutical sciences.

Table of Contents

  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • List of Contributors
  • Chapter 1. Unmet Medical Needs
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 A Historical Perspective
    • 1.2 Unmet Medical Needs
    • 1.3 Addressing the Problems
    • 1.4 Personalized Medicine
    • 1.5 Personalized Medicine: The Role of Metabolic Phenotyping
    • References
  • Chapter 2. The Development of Metabolic Phenotyping—A Historical Perspective
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 The 20th Century
    • 2.3 The COMET Project for Drug Toxicity
    • 2.4 Attempts to Define Biofluid Composition and Standardize Procedures
    • 2.5 Early Efforts at Integrating Metabolic Phenotyping Data With Other “-Omics” Data
    • 2.6 Population Scale Studies and Biomarkers of Disease Risk
    • 2.7 Predictive Metabolic Phenotyping and its Application to Stratified Medicine
    • 2.8 Monitoring the Patient Journey
    • 2.9 Phenome Center Concept
    • 2.10 Concluding Remarks
    • Acknowledgment
    • References
  • Chapter 3. Phenotyping the Patient Journey
    • Abstract
    • 3.1 Bottlenecks in the Patient Journey
    • 3.2 What Does a Good Patient Journey Look Like?
    • 3.3 The Role of Metabolic Profiling in the Patient Journey
    • 3.4 Stratified and Personalized Health Care
    • 3.5 Data Visualization for the Physician
    • 3.6 Communication With the Patient and Family: Improving the Patient Experience
    • 3.7 Implementing Clinical Metabolic Phenotyping in the Patient Journey: The Clinical Phenome Center Concept
    • References
  • Chapter 4. Precision Surgery and Surgical Spectroscopy
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Surgery as a Model for Studying Metabolism
    • 4.3 Molecular Phenotyping and Sample Phenotyping
    • 4.4 Current Challenges in Surgical Cancer Biomarker Discovery
    • 4.5 Chemical Biopsy and Chemistry in the Clinic
    • 4.6 Lipid Metabolism in Cancer
    • 4.7 “Intelligent” Surgical Devices
    • 4.8 Rapid evaporative Ionization–Mass Spectrometry
    • 4.9 Summary and Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 5. High-Throughput Metabolic Screening
    • Abstract
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Sample Procedures
    • 5.3 Analytical Platforms
    • 5.4 Bioinformatics Processes for High-Throughput Analysis
    • References
  • Chapter 6. Pharmacometabonomics and Predictive Metabonomics: New Tools for Personalized Medicine
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Introduction
    • 6.2 The Discovery of Pharmacometabonomics
    • 6.3 The Use of Pharmacometabonomics for the Prediction of Pharmacokinetics and Drug Metabolism
    • 6.4 The Use of Pharmacometabonomics for the Prediction of Drug Safety and Drug Efficacy
    • 6.5 Predictive Metabonomics
    • 6.6 Future Developments
    • References
  • Chapter 7. Population Screening for Biological and Environmental Properties of the Human Metabolic Phenotype: Implications for Personalized Medicine
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 Defining the Metabolic Phenotype
    • 7.3 The Human Exposome
    • 7.4 Population Screening
    • 7.5 Metabolic Phenotyping for Environmental Exposures
    • 7.6 Case Study
    • 7.7 Conclusion
    • Acknowledgments
    • References
  • Chapter 8. Handing on Health to the Next Generation: Early Life Exposures
    • Abstract
    • 8.1 Why it is Important to Hand on Good Health to the Next Generation
    • 8.2 The Influence of the Early Life Environment
    • 8.3 The Development of Metabolism in Neonates
    • 8.4 The Marriage of the Microbiome and Human Metabolism
    • 8.5 Conditions in Pregnancy Affecting Offspring
    • 8.6 Postnatal Factors that Influence Downstream Health
    • 8.7 Proposed Strategy for a Metabonomic Framework for Monitoring Maternal and Infant Health
    • 8.8 Summary
    • References
  • Chapter 9. The Aging Superorganism
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Systems Biology of Aging
    • 9.3 Nutrition, Diet, and Calorific Restriction
    • 9.4 The Aging Superorganism
    • 9.5 Microbiome Immune Modulation and Inflamm-Aging
    • 9.6 Diseases of the Aging Population: ALZHEIMER’S Disease and Dementia
    • 9.7 Personalized Health Care in an Aging Population
    • 9.8 Who Wants to Live Forever?
    • References
  • Chapter 10. Phenome Centers and Global Harmonization
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Phenomics and the Human Condition
    • 10.2 Phenomics: A Focus on Outputs
    • 10.3 The Gene–Protein Axis
    • 10.4 The Difference Between Metabolomics and Phenomics
    • 10.5 The Value Proposition of Phenomics Research
    • 10.6 Phenome Centers in 21st Century Health Research and Medicine
    • 10.7 The Utility of Phenomics in Health Care
    • 10.8 The Value of Phenome Centers in Health Research
    • 10.9 The Limitations and Challenges to Realizing the Potential of Phenomics and Phenome Centers
    • Conclusions
    • Endnotes
    • References
  • Chapter 11. From Databases to Big Data
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Reference Chemical Databases
    • 11.3 Databases Containing Metabolomics-Based Experiments
    • 11.4 Conclusions: The Challenges of Metabolomics Big Data
    • References
  • Chapter 12. Modeling People and Populations: Exploring Medical Visualization Through Immersive Interactive Virtual Environments
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Introduction
    • 12.2 Modalities and Methods in Medical Visualization
    • 12.3 Big Data and Their Management
    • 12.4 Immersive Interactive Virtual Environments
    • Conclusions
    • References
  • Chapter 13. Future Visions for Clinical Metabolic Phenotyping: Prospects and Challenges
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Development of Metabolic Phenotyping
    • 13.2 Current Status of Metabolic Phenotyping
    • 13.3 Technologic Challenges for Integration of Metabolic Phenotyping Into Medicine
    • 13.4 The Human Being as a Supra-Organism
    • 13.5 Prospects for Metabolic Phenotyping in Clinical Medicine and Epidemiology
    • 13.6 Potential New Metabolic Phenotyping Outputs
    • 13.7 Possible Impacts of Metabolic Phenotyping in Medicine
    • References
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
428
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128004142
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128003442

About the Editor

Jeremy Nicholson

Head of Surgery and Cancer, Professor of Biological Chemistry, Imperial College London, London, UK

Affiliations and Expertise

Head of Surgery and Cancer, Professor of Biological Chemistry, Imperial College London, London, UK

Ara Darzi

Head of Biosurgery and Surgical Technology, Hamlyn Chair of Surgery, Imperial College London, London, UK

Affiliations and Expertise

Head of Biosurgery and Surgical Technology, Hamlyn Chair of Surgery, Imperial College London, London, UK

Elaine Holmes

Head of Computational and Systems Medicine, Professor of Chemical Biology, Imperial College London, London, UK

Affiliations and Expertise

Head of Computational and Systems Medicine, Professor of Chemical Biology, Imperial College London, London, UK

John C. Lindon

Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK

Affiliations and Expertise

Division of Computational and Systems Medicine, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK