Managing Water on China's Farms - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128051641, 9780128052945

Managing Water on China's Farms

1st Edition

Institutions, Policies and the Transformation of Irrigation under Scarcity

Authors: Jinxia Wang Qiuqiong Huang Jikun Huang Scott Rozelle
eBook ISBN: 9780128052945
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128051641
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 22nd March 2016
Page Count: 354
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Description

Managing Water on China's Farms: Institutions, Policies and the Transformation of Irrigation under Scarcity is a comprehensive and current look at the water shortage problems in China. While China has emerged as a major player in the world economy, water is the most critical factor that limits the country’s further growth. China’s growing water problems also have a large impact worldwide, with public health as well as economic impacts. If China were to rely heavily on food produced outside of China, the massive volume of food imports would raise food prices internationally. This book examines a series of water issues, beginning with a description of the water shortage problems in China, particularly in the northern part of the country. It then looks at the government and farmers' responses and whether past policies have been effective in resolving the water problems.

Managing Water on China’s Farms documents the change of existing and new water management institutional forms over time and across provinces throughout northern China, and then assesses the impacts of these changes in the rural sector. Finally, it examines potential solutions that the research has uncovered, answering the question: Who can build the bridge over China’s troubled waters? Using analyses from information collected firsthand in China’s rural villages, the series of surveys covers diverse geographic regions that are representative of north China and includes perspectives from multiple stakeholders such as village leaders, water managers, and farmers. The policy-oriented research and rich analysis in this book make it of interest to both policy makers and researchers with a focus on China water problems. This book can also be used in a Master or Ph.D. level resource economics course.

Key Features

  • Uses case studies including problem, factors, proposed solutions, and pros and cons of each to facilitate translational learning and application
  • Uses analyses of firsthand data collected from sources of irrigation water, irrigation systems, and water users
  • Covers governance and operation and maintenance (O and M) practices
  • Provides an informative, quantitative, and rigorous analysis of survey results
  • Provides practical and valuable data, including the detailed micro-level data that enables estimating strategies

Readership

Agricultural scientists and those involved in policy development facing water resource scarcity and developing efficient methods of using available resources

Table of Contents

  • About the Authors
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • Introduction and Conclusions
  • Section I. Setting the Stage
    • Chapter 1. Water Scarcity in Northern China
      • China's Groundwater Resources
      • The Rise of Tubewells
      • Groundwater Resources From Farmers' Perspective
      • Groundwater Problems and Challenges
      • Other Problems With Groundwater
      • Perception of Village Leaders and Farmers About Water Scarcity
      • Changes in Surface and Groundwater Supply Reliability
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 2. Irrigation, Agricultural Production, and Rural Income
      • Irrigation and Agricultural Production
      • Irrigation and Income
      • Irrigation and Inequality
      • New Irrigation Projects: Benefits Versus Costs
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 3. China's Agricultural Water Policy Reforms: Increasing Investment, Resolving Conflicts, and Revising Incentives
      • China's Water Management Policies and Institutions
      • Infrastructure Investment and Policy Reform
      • Farmers' Incentives to Reduce Water Consumption
      • Water Pricing in China
      • Promotion of Water-Saving Irrigation Technology
      • Irrigation District Management Reform
      • Water Allocation Decisions
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 4. Water Survey Data
      • China Water Institutions and Management (CWIM) Survey
      • North China Water Resource Survey (NCWRS)
      • China National Rural Survey (CNRS)
      • Bank Survey
  • Section II. Groundwater Management
    • Chapter 5. Evolution, Determinants, and Impacts of Tubewell Ownership/Management
      • The Evolution of Tubewell Ownership
      • Determinants of Privatization
      • Estimation Results of Econometric Models
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 6. Development of Groundwater Markets in China
      • Groundwater Markets With Chinese Characteristics
      • Groundwater Markets, Tubewell Ownership, and Resource Scarcity
      • Estimation Results of Econometric Models
      • Do Groundwater Markets Help the Poor?
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 7. Impacts of Groundwater Markets on Agricultural Production in China
      • Access to Groundwater and Water Use, Yields, and Income
      • Impact on Farmer Income
      • Estimation Results of Econometric Model
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
  • Section III. Surface Water Management
    • Chapter 8. Water User Associations and Contracts: Evolution and Determinants
      • Trends in Northern China's Water Management Reform, 1995 to 2004
      • Differences in Governance Among Water Management Institutions
      • Why Are WUAs and Contracting Used in Some Areas but Not Others?
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 9. Determinants of Contractual Form
      • Three Forms of Contracts in Managing the Canal System
      • Modeling Managerial Choice in Rural China
      • Variables
      • Contractual Choices and the Nature of the Irrigation System
      • Explaining Contractual Choice in Canal Management: Multivariate Analysis
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 10. Impacts of Surface Water Management Reforms
      • Reform and the Evolution of Water Management
      • Water Management and Crop Water Use
      • Water Management, Production, Income, and Poverty
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 11. Evaluation of Water User Associations
      • Organizing China's WUAs: The Five Principles?
      • Principle 1: Adequate and Reliable Water Supply
      • Principle 2: Legal Status and Participation
      • Principle 3: WUAs Organized Within Hydraulic Boundaries
      • Principle 4: Water Deliveries Can Be Measured Volumetrically
      • Principle 5: Nature of Way in Which WUA Collects Water Charges From Members
      • A Summary: The Five Principles and Best Practice
      • Performance
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
  • Section IV. Future Options
    • Chapter 12. Irrigation Water-Pricing Policy
      • Nature of Irrigation Water Demand in Northern China
      • Effectiveness and Impacts of Water-Pricing Policies in Rural China
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Chapter 13. Water Allocation Through Water Rights Institution
      • The Yellow River Basin (YRB)
      • Institutional Arrangements for Water Allocation
      • Effects of Water Reallocation in the YRB
      • Ongoing Water Right Transfer Project in the YRB
      • Conclusions and Policy Implication
    • Chapter 14. Adoption of Water-Saving Technology
      • Water-Saving Technology
      • Farmer Perceptions of Technology Traits
      • Water-Saving Technology Adoption
      • The Determinants of Water-Saving Technology Adoption
      • Estimation Results of Econometric Model
      • Conclusions and Policy Implications
    • Methodological Appendices
      • Methodological Appendix to Chapter 2
      • Methodological Appendix to Chapter 5
      • Methodology Appendix to Chapter 6
      • Methodology Appendix to Chapter 7
      • Methodological Appendix to Chapter 9
      • Methodology Appendix to Chapter 10
      • Methodology Appendix to Chapter 11
      • Methodology Appendix to Chapter 12
      • Methodology Appendix to Chapter 13
      • Methodology Appendix to Chapter 14
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
354
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128052945
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128051641

About the Author

Jinxia Wang

Jinxia Wang is the Deputy Director and Professor at Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy (CCAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). She is also a Professor, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), CAS. Her research focuses on water management, institution and policy, climate change (impact evaluation and adaptation strategies), and rural environmental policy. She received her Ph.D. in Agricultural Economics (2000) at Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences. She has published more than 150 papers (more than 60 are in English) and four books. In 2009, she received the Outstanding Young Scientist Award from the National Natural Science Foundation in China.

Affiliations and Expertise

Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Qiuqiong Huang

Qiuqiong Huang is an Associate Professor at University of Arkansas. Her research focuses on natural resource economics (with an emphasis on water and land) and development issues including education, migration and labor market outcomes. She received her Ph.D. in Agricultural and Resource Economics (2006) at University of California, Davis. Her publications have appeared in Agricultural Water Management, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Ecological Economics, Environment and Development Economics, Food Policy, Journal of Productivity Analysis, and Water Resources Research.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, USA

Jikun Huang

Jikun Huang is the Founder, Director and Professor at Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy (CCAP), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). He is also a Professor, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR), CAS. He received his Ph.D. in economics from University of the Philippines at Los Banos in 1990. His research covers a wide range of issues on China's agricultural and rural development, including work on agricultural R&D policy, water resource economics, price and marketing, food consumption, poverty, trade policy, and climate change. He received the Outstanding Scientific Progress award from the Ministry of Agriculture four times, Award for China’s top ten outstanding youth scientists in 2002, Outstanding Achievement Award for Overseas Returning Chinese in 2003, Outstanding Contribution Award on Management Science in 2008, the UPLB Distinguished Alumni Award in 2008, and 2010 IRRI’s Outstanding Alumni Award. In 2013, he was elected member of the World Academy of Sciences (TWAS). He has published more than 400 journal papers, of which more than 200 papers in the international journals, including Science and Nature. He is co-author of 18 books.

Affiliations and Expertise

Founder, Director and Professor, Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Professor, Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Science

Scott Rozelle

Scott Rozelle is the Helen F. Farnsworth Senior Fellow and the co-director of the Rural Education Action Program in the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University. His research focuses almost exclusively on China and is concerned with: agricultural policy, including the supply, demand, and trade in agricultural projects; the emergence and evolution of markets and other economic institutions in the transition process and their implications for equity and efficiency; and the economics of poverty and inequality, with an emphasis on rural education, health and nutrition. Rozelle's papers have been published in top academic journals, including Science, Nature, American Economic Review, and the Journal of Economic Literature. He received his Ph.D. (1990) from Cornell University.

Affiliations and Expertise

Senior Fellow and co-director, Rural Education Action Program, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Stanford University, USA