Description

This is the first major review of the developments in clinical laboratory science in the 20th century presented in the words of the original inventors and discoverers. Introductory comments by the editor help place the works within the historical context. Landmark Papers addresses: *The origin of the home pregnancy test available today in every drugstore *The woman who invented a billion dollar technology, refused to patent it and went on to win a Nobel Prize *The scientists who worked on the US Government’s crash program at the start of WWII to find a substitute for the malaria drug quinine *The blood test used to monitor the effectiveness of cholesterol lowering drugs that today are taken by over 20 million patients *The graduate student who invented a technology for testing for infectious diseases, took it to Africa to screen people for malaria for the first time and which is now used to test for HIV infection world-wide *The invention of molecular diagnostics by Linus Pauling and the road to individualized medicine *The development of the glucose meter used by diabetics up to six times a day to monitor their metabolic control

Key Features

*First book of this kind dedicated to clinical chemistry *Thirty-nine articles that have shaped the field today *A survey of the major developments in the field clinical chemistry in the 20th century

Readership

Students and workers in the clinical laboratory field; Teachers in the clinical laboratory field; Clinical Chemists; Clinical Pathologists; Medical Laboratory Technologists; Industries that have commercialized the technologies (i.e., Abbott, Beckman, Pharmacia, etc...)

Table of Contents

Preface Section I IMMUNOASSAY TECHNOLOGY RIA (Radioimmunoassay) 1. Yalow, R.S., Berson, S.A. (1960: Assay of plasma insulin in man. FPIA (Fluorescence Polarization Immunoassay) 2. Dandliker, W.B., Feigen, G.A. (1961): Quantification of the antigen-antibody reaction by the polarization of fluorescence. CPB (Competitive Protein Binding) 3. Murphy, B.E.P., Pattee, C.J. (1964): Determination of thyroxine utilizing the property of protein-binding. ELISA (Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay) 4. Engvall, E., Perlmann, P. (1972): Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, ELISA. III. EMITä (Enzyme Immunoassay Technique) 5. Rubenstein, K.E., Schneider, R. S., Ullman, E.F. (1972): "Homogeneous" enzyme immunoassay. Section II THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING (TDM) Bromide 6. Wuth, O. (1927): Rational bromide treatment. Sulfonamides 7. Bratton, A.C., Marshall, E.K., Jr., (1939): A New Coupling Component for Sulfanilamide Determination. Quinine and Quinidine 8. Brodie, B.B., Udenfriend, S. (1943): The estimation of quinine in human plasma with a note on the estimation of quinidine. Digoxin 9. Smith, T.W., Butler, V.P., Haber, E. (1969): Determination of therapeutic and toxic serum digoxin concentrations by radioimmunoassay. Theophylline 10. Thompson, R.D., Nagasawa, H.T., Jenne, J.W. (1974): Determination of theophylline and its metabolites in human urine and serum by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Section III ENZYMOLOGY ALP (Alkaline Phosphatase, EC 3.1.3.1)) 11. Bessey, O.A., Lowry, O.H., Brock, M.J. (1946): A method for the rapid determination of alkaline phosphatase with five cubic millimeters of serum. A

Details

No. of pages:
522
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2006
Published:
Imprint:
Elsevier Science
Electronic ISBN:
9780080458946
Print ISBN:
9780444519504
Print ISBN:
9780444547507

About the editor

Richard M. Rocco

Following a 25-year career in clinical chemistry, R M Rocco currently teaches graduate courses in the biomedical laboratory sciences at San Francisco State University. Landmark Papers grew out of a graduate seminar in landmark papers in biotechnology. Dr Rocco has extensive experience in directing pharmaceutical and clinical chemistry research and development groups.

Reviews

"With these landmark papers, an interested reader can easily trace the origins of the techniques that are being used in clinical laboratories today and the analytes being measured with them." --Carl A. Burtis, Chief Clinical Chemistry, Health Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN "...highlights the extensive and varied scientific basis of the discipline we call clinical chemistry. Of particular importance, it rekindles memories of the giants who have placed this discipline for taking care of people in our hands." --Amadeo J. Pesce, Director of Clinical Toxicology Laboratory, University of Cincinnati Hospital, OH