Introduction to Environmental Forensics - 3rd Edition - ISBN: 9780124046962, 9780124047075

Introduction to Environmental Forensics

3rd Edition

Editors: Brian Murphy Robert Morrison
eBook ISBN: 9780124047075
Hardcover ISBN: 9780124046962
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 18th September 2014
Page Count: 704
Tax/VAT will be calculated at check-out Price includes VAT (GST)
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
30% off
20% off
20% off
111.00
77.70
77.70
77.70
77.70
77.70
88.80
88.80
90.00
63.00
63.00
63.00
63.00
63.00
72.00
72.00
148.00
103.60
103.60
103.60
103.60
103.60
118.40
118.40
Unavailable
Price includes VAT (GST)
× DRM-Free

Easy - Download and start reading immediately. There’s no activation process to access eBooks; all eBooks are fully searchable, and enabled for copying, pasting, and printing.

Flexible - Read on multiple operating systems and devices. Easily read eBooks on smart phones, computers, or any eBook readers, including Kindle.

Open - Buy once, receive and download all available eBook formats, including PDF, EPUB, and Mobi (for Kindle).

Institutional Access

Secure Checkout

Personal information is secured with SSL technology.

Free Shipping

Free global shipping
No minimum order.

Description

The third edition of Introduction to Environmental Forensics is a state-of-the-art reference for the practicing environmental forensics consultant, regulator, student, academic, and scientist, with topics including compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA), advanced multivariate statistical techniques, surrogate approaches for contaminant source identification and age dating, dendroecology, hydrofracking, releases from underground storage tanks and piping, and contaminant-transport modeling for forensic applications. Recognized international forensic scientists were selected to author chapters in their specific areas of expertise and case studies are included to illustrate the application of these methods in actual environmental forensic investigations. This edition provides updates on advances in various techniques and introduces several new topics.

Key Features

  • Provides a comprehensive review of all aspects of environmental forensics
  • Coverage ranges from emerging statistical methods to state-of-the-art analytical techniques, such as gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry and polytopic vector analysis
  • Numerous examples and case studies are provided to illustrate the application of these forensic techniques in environmental investigations

Readership

environmental consultants, environmental attorneys, graduate and undergraduate students; environmental laboratories and employees; international, federal, state and local regulators

Table of Contents

  • About the Editors
  • About the Authors
  • Introduction to the Third Edition
  • Section I. Basic Information
    • Chapter 1. Applications of Environmental Forensics
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Chemical Characterization and/or Delineation of Contamination
      • 1.3. Reconstructing Historical Releases and Establishing Background
      • 1.4. Determination of Responsibility and Allocation of Liability
      • 1.5. Insurance Litigation
      • 1.6. Toxic Torts
    • Chapter 2. Essential Historical Research Methods and Their Application to Environmental Forensics
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. Historical Research for Site Assessment or Responsibility Assignment
      • 2.3. Historical Research and Analysis for Apportionment and Cost Allocation
      • 2.4. The Historian’s Contribution to Liability Determinations
      • 2.5. The Historian’s Contribution to Cost Allocation
      • 2.6. Historical Research and Analysis for Matters of “Intentionality”
      • 2.7. Conclusion
    • Chapter 3. Photogrammetry, Photointerpretation, and Digital Imaging and Mapping in Environmental Forensics
      • 3.1. The Aerial Photographic Record
      • 3.2. Principles of Photogrammetry
      • 3.3. Photointerpretation
      • 3.4. Analytical Products and Preparation of Exhibits
      • 3.5. Case Studies
      • 3.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 4. The Measurement Process
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Sampling and Analytical Errors in the Measurement Process
      • 4.3. Planning
      • 4.4. Sampling Different Media
      • 4.5. Data Assessment
      • 4.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 5. Statistical Methods
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Background
      • 5.3. Applications in Environmental Forensics
      • 5.4. Conclusion
    • Chapter 6. Identification of Forensic Information from Existing Conventional Site-Investigation Data
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Site History
      • 6.3. Geological Data
      • 6.4. Hydrogeological Data
      • 6.5. Contaminant Chemistry Data
      • 6.6. High Resolution Site Characterization (HRSC) Data
      • 6.7. Data Reflecting Postrelease Contaminant Concentration Pattern Changes
      • 6.8. Conclusion
    • Chapter 7. Chemical Partitioning and Transport in the Environment
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Chemical Parameters
      • 7.3. Fugacity Description of Partitioning
      • 7.4. Mass-Transfer Models
      • 7.5. The Advection–Dispersion Equation
      • 7.6. Conclusion
      • List of Symbols and Abbreviations
  • Section II. Chemical, Biological, And Isotopic Pattern-Recognition Methods
    • Chapter 8. Hydrocarbon Fingerprinting Methods
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Overview of Chemical Fingerprinting Methodology
      • 8.3. Quality Assurance and Quality Control
      • 8.4. Volatile Hydrocarbon Fingerprinting Methods
      • 8.5. Semivolatile Hydrocarbon Fingerprinting Methods
    • Chapter 9. Source Identification and Age Dating of Chlorinated Solvents
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Product Formulations and Diagnostic Stabilizers
      • 9.3. Manufacturing Impurities
      • 9.4. Manufacturing Impurities to Distinguish New and Used Vapor Degreasing Chlorinated Solvents
      • 9.5. Symmetric Tetrachloroethane for Age Dating PCE and TCE
      • 9.6. Compound-Specific Isotope Analysis (CSIA)
      • 9.7. Reconstructed Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Plume Technique
      • 9.8. Conclusion
    • Chapter 10. Congeners: A Forensics Analysis
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)
      • 10.3. Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
      • 10.4. Dioxins and Furans
      • 10.5. Other Chemical Families
      • 10.6. Developing Analytical Tools for Forensic Studies of Congeners
      • 10.7. Conclusion
    • Chapter 11. Application of Stable Isotopes and Radioisotopes in Environmental Forensics
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Radioisotope Age Dating of Contaminants in Sediments and Groundwater
      • 11.3. Use of Stable Isotopes to Identify Contaminant Sources
      • 11.4. Biodegradation
      • 11.5. Vocs and Vapor Intrusion
      • 11.6. Sources and Sink of Atmospheric Gases
      • 11.7. Combining Isotope Methods with Other Methods
      • 11.8. Inorganic Isotopes
      • 11.9. Shale Gas, Shale Oil, and Hydrofracking
      • 11.10. Developments in LC/IRMS
    • Chapter 12. Criminal and Environmental Soil Forensics: Soil as Physical Evidence in Forensic Investigations
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. Soil and Forensic Context
      • 12.3. Classic Methods of Characterizing Soil for Forensic Investigations
      • 12.4. The Practice of Forensic Investigations Relating to Soil
      • 12.5. Developments in Analysis of Soil Samples
      • 12.6. Characterization of Soil Organic Matter
      • 12.7. Maximization of Soil Evidence by Integration and Use of Databases
    • Chapter 13. Environmental Forensic Microscopy
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Sampling and Analysis Equipment
      • 13.3. Determining the Nature of Contaminants
      • 13.4. Measuring the Extent of a Specific Contaminant
      • 13.5. Case Studies: Examples of Environmental Forensic Microscopy Investigations
      • 13.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 14. Hydraulic Fracturing: Data Analysis Methods to Identify Sources of Dissolved Gas and Chemical Compounds in Drinking Water Wells
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Chemical Characterization of Potential Sources for The Drinking Water Well in Question
      • 14.3. Sampling of Drinking Water Wells
      • 14.4. Laboratory Analysis
      • 14.5. Data Analysis Methods to Investigate The Source(s) of Gases in Drinking Water Wells
      • 14.6. Conclusion
    • Chapter 15. Forensic Applications of Dendroecology
      • 15.1. Introduction
      • 15.2. Terminology
      • 15.3. Principles
      • 15.4. Dendroecology/Phytoscreening Sampling
      • 15.5. Sample Preparation and Analysis
      • 15.6. Forensic Opportunities
      • 15.7. Interpretation of Dendroecology/Phytoscreening Data
      • 15.8. Conclusion
  • Section III. Forensic Modeling
    • Chapter 16. Forensic Applications of Subsurface Contaminant Transport Models
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Contaminant Releases on a Paved and Unpaved Surface
      • 16.3. Contaminant Transport Through a Paved Surface
      • 16.4. Contaminant Transport Through an Unpaved Surface
      • 16.5. Contaminant Transport Through Soil
      • 16.6. Groundwater Models
      • 16.7. Conclusion
    • Chapter 17. Forensic Investigation of Underground Storage Tanks and Subsurface Piping
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Forensic Sampling During Tank Excavation
      • 17.3. Historical UST Standards
      • 17.4. Corrosion
      • 17.5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 18. Principal Components Analysis and Receptor Models in Environmental Forensics
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Principal Components Analysis
      • 18.3. Self-Training Receptor-Modeling Methods
      • 18.4. The Influence of Alteration Processes on Mixing Models
      • 18.5. Conclusion
    • Chapter 19. Multivariate Statistical Methods and Source Identification in Environmental Forensics
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Multivariate Methods
    • Chapter 20. Receptor Models and Measurements for Identifying and Quantifying Air Pollution Sources
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. The General Air Quality Model
      • 20.3. The Chemical Mass Balance Receptor Model
      • 20.4. Chemical Components (i)
      • 20.5. Source Profiles (j)
      • 20.6. Sampling Periods (k)
      • 20.7. Particle Size (m)
      • 20.8. Receptor Locations (l)
      • 20.9. Estimating Uncertainties (σCikl, σFij, and σSjkl)
      • 20.10. Receptor-Model Application and Validation Protocol
      • 20.11. Conclusion
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
704
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780124047075
Hardcover ISBN:
9780124046962

About the Editor

Brian Murphy

Affiliations and Expertise

Exponent, Incorporated, Sarasota, FL, USA

Robert Morrison

Affiliations and Expertise

DPRA, San Marcos, CA, USA

Reviews

"...an effective and dependable reference guide to many who research or practice in this area. It is highly recommended and would be appropriate as a professional publication for forensic scientists of all levels during their career." --Interfaces