Insect Ecology - 4th Edition - ISBN: 9780128030332, 9780128030370

Insect Ecology

4th Edition

An Ecosystem Approach

Authors: Timothy Schowalter
eBook ISBN: 9780128030370
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128030332
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 10th August 2016
Page Count: 774
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Description

Insect Ecology: An Ecosystem Approach, Fourth Edition, follows a hierarchical organization that begins with relatively easy-to-understand chapters on adaptive responses of insect populations to various environmental changes, disturbances, and anthropogenic activities, how insects find food and habitat resources, and how insects allocate available energy and nutrients.

Chapters build on fundamental information to show how insect populations respond to changing environmental conditions, including spatial and temporal distribution of food and habitat. The next section integrates populations of interacting species within communities and how these interactions determine structure of communities over time and space.

Other works in insect ecology stop there, essentially limiting presentation of insect ecology to evolutionary responses of insects to their environment, including the activities of other species. The unique aspect of this book is its four chapters on ecosystem structure and function, and how herbivores, pollinators, seed predators, and detritivores drive ecosystem dynamics and contribute to ecosystem stability.

Key Features

  • Provides the most advanced synthesis of insect ecology, with updated material throughout and new chapters
  • Presents the roles of insects in delivery of ecosystem services and applications to pest management and conservation
  • Features full coverage of ecosystem structure and function balanced with essential background on evolutionary aspects
  • Includes case studies highlighting practical and theoretical applications for topics covered in each chapter

Readership

Primarily professional entomologists, ecologists and others with interest in how insects engineer our global ecosystem, as well as how they respond to environmental changes. This book can be, and has been, used in graduate Insect Ecology courses. Reviewers of previous editions also have recommended it for undergraduate Insect Ecology students

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Overview
    • Abstract
    • 1. Scope of insect ecology
    • 2. Ecosystem ecology
    • 3. Environmental change and disturbance
    • 4. Ecosystem approach to insect ecology
    • 5. Scope of this book
  • Section I: Ecology of individual insects
    • Introduction
    • Chapter 2: Responses to Abiotic Conditions
      • Abstract
      • Introduction
    • Chapter 3: Resource Acquisition
      • Abstract
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Resource quality
      • 3. Resource acceptability
      • 4. Resource availability
      • 5. Summary
    • Chapter 4: Resource Allocation
      • Abstract
      • 1. Introduction
      • 2. Resource budget
      • 3. Allocation of assimilated resources
      • 4. Efficiency of resource use
      • 5. Summary
  • Section II: Population ecology
    • Introduction
      • Chapter 5: Population Systems
        • Abstract
        • 1. Introduction
        • 2. Population structure
        • 3. Population Processes
        • 4. Life history characteristics
        • 5. Parameter estimation
        • 6. Summary
      • Chapter 6: Population Dynamics
        • Abstract
        • 1. Introduction
        • 2. Population fluctuation
        • 3. Factors affecting population size
        • 4. Models of population change
        • 5. Summary
      • Chapter 7: Biogeography
        • Abstract
        • 1. Introduction
        • 2. Geographic distribution
        • 3. Spatial dynamics of populations
        • 4. Habitat connectivity
        • 5. Anthropogenic effects on spatial dynamics
        • 6. Models of spatial dynamics
        • 7. Summary
    • Section III: Community ecology
      • Introduction
        • Chapter 8: Species Interactions
          • Abstract
          • 1. Introduction
          • 2. Direct interactions
          • 3. Indirect effects
          • 4. Factors affecting interactions
          • 5. Consequences of interactions
          • 6. Summary
        • Chapter 9: Community Structure
          • Abstract
          • 1. Introduction
          • 2. Approaches to describing communities
          • 3. Patterns of community structure
          • 4. Determinants of community structure
          • 5. Summary
        • Chapter 10: Community Dynamics
          • Abstract
          • 1. Introduction
          • 2. Short-term change in community structure
          • 3. Successional change in community structure
          • 4. Paleoecology
          • 5. Diversity versus stability
          • 6. Summary
      • Section IV: Ecosystem level
        • Introduction
          • Chapter 11: Ecosystem Structure and Function
            • Abstract
            • 1. Introduction
            • 2. Ecosystem structure
            • 3. Energy flow
            • 4. Biogeochemical cycling
            • 5. Climate modification
            • 6. Urban ecosystems
            • 7. Ecosystem modeling
            • 8. Summary
          • Chapter 12: Herbivory
            • Abstract
            • 1. Introduction
            • 2. Types and patterns of herbivory
            • 3. Effects of herbivory
            • 4. Summary
          • Chapter 13: Pollination, Seed Predation, and Seed Dispersal
            • Abstract
            • 1. Introduction
            • 2. Types and patterns of pollination
            • 3. Effects of pollination
            • 4. Types and patterns of seed predation and dispersal
            • 5. Effects of seed predation and dispersal
            • 6. Summary
          • Chapter 14: Decomposition and Pedogenesis
            • Abstract
            • 1. Introduction
            • 2. Types and patterns of detritivory and burrowing
            • 3. Effects of detritivory and burrowing
            • 4. Summary
          • Chapter 15: Insects as Regulators of Ecosystem Processes
            • Abstract
            • 1. Introduction
            • 2. Development of the concept
            • 3. Ecosystems as cybernetic systems
            • 4. Summary
        • Section V: Applications and synthesis
          • Introduction
            • Chapter 16: Application to Sustainability of Ecosystem Services
              • Abstract
              • 1. Introduction
              • 2. Provisioning services
              • 3. Cultural services
              • 4. Supporting services
              • 5. Regulating services
              • 6. Valuation of ecosystem services
              • 7. Threats to ecosystem services
              • 8. Insects as indicators of environmental change
              • 9. Summary
            • Chapter 17: Management of Insect Populations
              • Abstract
              • 1. Introduction
              • 2. Integrated pest management
              • 3. Conservation/restoration ecology
              • 4. Summary
            • Chapter 18: Summary and Synthesis
              • Abstract
              • 1. Summary
              • 2. Synthesis
              • 3. Critical issues
              • 4. Conclusions
          • Bibliography
          • Author Index
          • Taxonomic Index (Arthropods only)
          • Subject Index

          Details

          No. of pages:
          774
          Language:
          English
          Copyright:
          © Academic Press 2017
          Published:
          Imprint:
          Academic Press
          eBook ISBN:
          9780128030370
          Hardcover ISBN:
          9780128030332

          About the Author

          Timothy Schowalter

          Timothy D. Schowalter received his Ph.D. degree in Entomology from the University of Georgia in 1979. Since 1981, he has been a professor of entomology at Oregon State University, Corvallis, studying the effects of environmental changes, including natural and anthropogenic disturbances, on arthropod communities in temperate and tropical ecosystems, and effects of herbivores and detritivores on primary production, carbon flux, biogeochemical cycling. From 1992-93, he served as Program Director for Integrative and Theoretical Ecology at the National Science Foundation, where he was involved in developing global change and terrestrial ecosystem research initiatives at the federal level. He served as a U.S. delegate to international conventions to develop collaboration between U.S. Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) sites and long term sites in Hungary and East Asia and the Pacific.

          Affiliations and Expertise

          Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, USA

          Reviews

          "I consider Schowalter’s Insect Ecology to be the consummate text on the topic as the author has a very broad and diverse perspective on insect ecology. The ecosystem-level perspective Schowalter takes in this book fills the need to incorporate insects and their influence into a larger, applied context. Insects have huge impacts on timber availability, large scale fires, and the carbon sink capacity of our forests. Understanding insects' influence on these disturbances and ecosystem services is essential for land managers, restoration project managers, and environmental consultants, in addition to research scientists." -- Dr. Samantha Chapman, Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Villanova University

          Ratings and Reviews