Hydroxyapatite (HAp) for Biomedical Applications - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782420330, 9781782420415

Hydroxyapatite (HAp) for Biomedical Applications

1st Edition

Editors: Michael Mucalo
eBook ISBN: 9781782420415
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782420330
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 27th February 2015
Page Count: 404
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Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials
  • Preface
  • Part One: Properties and biological response to hydroxyapatite for medical applications
    • 1: Structure and properties of hydroxyapatite for biomedical applications
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction: key properties
      • 1.2 Strengths/weaknesses
      • 1.3 Examples of applications
      • 1.4 Future trends
    • 2: Adhesion of hydroxyapatite on titanium medical implants
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Hydroxyapatite
      • 2.3 Anodic oxidation (anodizing)
      • 2.4 Coating techniques and adhesion to HAp
      • 2.5 Thin film adhesion properties
      • 2.6 Adhesion measurement techniques
      • 2.7 Conclusion
    • 3: Biological responses to hydroxyapatite
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 How cellular responses to HAp are studied
      • 3.3 Development of the bone–HAp interface
      • 3.4 Cell attachment
      • 3.5 Resorption and remodeling
      • 3.6 Inflammatory response to HAp particulates
      • 3.7 Influence of surface topography
      • 3.8 Osteoinduction
      • 3.9 Influence of ion substitutions
      • 3.10 Response to electrically charged HAp
      • 3.11 Conclusion and future prospects
    • 4: In vitro degradation behavior of hydroxyapatite
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction: background
      • 4.2 In vitro evaluation techniques for biodegradability of calcium phosphate-based (Ca-P) ceramic materials
      • 4.3 Models representing dissolution kinetics
      • 4.4 Models representing dissolution profiles
      • 4.5 Applications
      • 4.6 Effects of heterogeneous structure
      • 4.7 Conclusions
    • 5: Zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite for the inhibition of osteoporosis
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Zinc
      • 5.3 Zinc and the skeleton
      • 5.4 Zinc substituted hydroxyapatite
      • 5.5 Osteoporosis
      • 5.6 Conclusions and future trends
  • Part Two: Biomedical applications of hydroxyapatite
    • 6: Ultra-thin hydroxyapatite sheets for dental applications
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Flexible HAp sheet
      • 6.3 Adhesion of sheet to dentin
      • 6.4 Dental applications
      • 6.5 Summary
    • 7: Hydroxyapatite coatings for metallic implants
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Advantages of HAp coating for biomedical applications
      • 7.3 Processing of HAp coatings
      • 7.4 Interactions of HAp coating with the host tissue
      • 7.5 Cemented and cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA)
      • 7.6 Effectiveness of HAp coating for orthopedic applications
      • 7.7 Current challenges and future directions
    • 8: Multifunctional bioactive nanostructured films
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Films for implants
      • 8.3 Multicomponent bioactive nanostructured films
      • 8.4 Mechanical properties of MuBiNaFs
      • 8.5 Surface engineering for biotribological applications
      • 8.6 Surface engineering to control topography, roughness, and blind porosity
      • 8.7 Final remarks and future approaches
    • 9: Porous hydroxyapatite for drug delivery
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Applications and requirements of porous HAp for drug delivery
      • 9.3 Preparation and characterization of porous HAp bioceramics for drug delivery
      • 9.4 Preparation strategies of drug delivery systems (DDS) based on CaPs
      • 9.5 Drug release kinetics and application prospective
      • 9.6 Summary and future trends
    • 10: Collagen–hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds for tissue engineering
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Bone as a composite of collagen and hydroxyapatite
      • 10.3 Fabrication of a collagen–hydroxyapatite composite scaffold
      • 10.4 Applications of collagen–hydroxyapatite composite in musculoskeletal tissue engineering
      • 10.5 Perspectives in collagen–hydroxyapatite development
    • 11: Synthetic hydroxyapatite for tissue engineering applications
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Design considerations for synthetic HAp scaffolds
      • 11.3 Production of porous HAp scaffolds
      • 11.4 Biological response of HAp scaffolds
      • 11.5 Applications of synthetic HAp scaffolds for tissue engineering
      • 11.6 Future trends
    • 12: Synthetic hydroxyapatite for bone-healing applications
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Examples of applications—synthetic hydroxyapatite in clinical studies
      • 12.3 Future trends in the clinical use and study of synthetic hydroxyapatites
    • 13: Hydroxyapatite coating on biodegradable magnesium and magnesium-based alloys
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Magnesium
      • 13.3 Hydroxyapatite coating
      • 13.4 Fluoridated hydroxyapatite coating
      • 13.5 Hydroxyapatite composite coating
      • 13.6 Mechanical integrity
      • 13.7 Conclusions
    • 14: Animal-bone derived hydroxyapatite in biomedical applications
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Species of vertebral animal bones processed
      • 14.3 The beginnings: historical use of animal bone as a xenogeneic implant; Kiel bone and Boplant
      • 14.4 Rationales for using animal bone (natural) sources for making biomedical materials
      • 14.5 Aspects of processing and characterization of animal bone-derived materials for biomedical applications
      • 14.6 Concerns with disease transmission from animal bone-derived products via in vivo use with a focus on BSE
      • 14.7 Orthopedic and dental clinical studies involving the use of animal bone-derived biomaterials with a focus on its use as a xenograft
      • 14.8 Endobon®
      • 14.9 Bio-Oss®
      • 14.10 Cerabone®
      • 14.11 PepGen P-15®
      • 14.12 Conclusion: the future of naturally sourced biomaterials?
    • 15: Silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite for biomedical applications
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Synthesis and processing of Si-HAp powders
      • 15.3 Influence of silicon on the HAp lattice
      • 15.4 Biocompatibility
      • 15.5 Clinical applications
      • 15.6 Future perspectives: improving the bioactivity by designing biomimetic/smart materials based on Si-HAp
      • 15.7 Conclusions
  • Index

Description

Hydroxyapatite in the form of hydroxycarbonate apatite is the principal mineral component of bone tissue in mammals. In Bioceramics, it is classed as a bioactive material, which means bone tissue grows directly on it when placed in apposition without intervening fibrous tissue. Hydroxyapatite is hence commonly used as bone grafts, fillers and as coatings for metal implants. This important book provides an overview of the most recent research and developments involving hydroxyapatite as a key material in medicine and its application.

Key Features

  • Reviews the important properties of hydroxyapatite as a biomaterial
  • Considers a range of specific forms of the material and their advantages
  • Reviews a range of specific medical applications for this important material

Readership

Researchers and developers in industry and academia who are interested in biomaterials, tissue engineering, drug delivery and coating applications.


Details

No. of pages:
404
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782420415
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782420330

About the Editors

Michael Mucalo Editor

Dr Michael R, Mucalo is Senior Lecturer in physical Chemistry at the University of Waikato in New Zealand.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Waikato, New Zealand