Human Milk Biochemistry and Infant Formula Manufacturing Technology - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781845697242, 9780857099150

Human Milk Biochemistry and Infant Formula Manufacturing Technology

1st Edition

Editors: M. Guo
eBook ISBN: 9780857099150
Hardcover ISBN: 9781845697242
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 28th February 2014
Page Count: 420
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Table of Contents

  • Contributor contact details
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  • 1. Introduction: trends and issues in breastfeeding and the use of infant formula
    • Abstract:
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Human milk and infant formula
    • 1.3 History of infant feeding
    • 1.4 Benefits of breastfeeding versus bottle-feeding
    • 1.5 Infant formula manufacturing
    • 1.6 Trends and new developments in infant formula
    • 1.7 Conclusion
    • 1.8 References
  • Part I: Human milk
    • 2. Chemical composition of human milk
      • Abstract:
      • 2.1 Introduction: gross composition, protein profile and fatty acids
      • 2.2 Fat-soluble vitamins in human milk
      • 2.3 Water-soluble vitamins
      • 2.4 Minerals in human milk: macroelements
      • 2.5 Trace elements/microminerals
      • 2.6 Sources of further information and advice
      • 2.7 References
    • 3. Bioactive components in human milk
      • Abstract:
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 The benefits of human milk
      • 3.3 Bioactive proteins and peptides
      • 3.4 Types of protein in human milk
      • 3.5 Bioactive lipid components
      • 3.6 Carbohydrate-based bioactive compounds
      • 3.7 Growth factors
      • 3.8 Nucleotides, neuropeptides and other bioactive factors
      • 3.9 Conclusions and future trends
      • 3.10 References
    • 4. Variations in the chemical composition of human milk
      • Abstract:
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Factors affecting milk composition: stage of lactation
      • 4.3 Factors affecting milk composition: maternal nutrition
      • 4.4 Factors affecting milk composition: environmental and other factors
      • 4.5 Comparisons of human milk composition in different countries and regions
      • 4.6 Bacteria in human milk and infectious diseases
      • 4.7 Mastitis, milk composition and infection
      • 4.8 Pollutants and other potentially harmful chemicals in milk
      • 4.9 References
    • 5. Human milk banking
      • Abstract:
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Collection and storage of human milk
      • 5.3 Processing of human banked milk
      • 5.4 Conclusions
      • 5.5 References
  • Part II: Infant formula formulation and processing
    • 6. Formulation guidelines for infant formula
      • Abstract:
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Regulations governing the formulation and nutrient content of infant formula
      • 6.3 Processing and preparation issues and regulation
      • 6.4 Key functional ingredients in infant formula
      • 6.5 Protein content
      • 6.6 Polyunsaturated fatty acids and other fat-related ingredients
      • 6.7 Carbohydrates, prebiotics, probiotics and oligosaccharides
      • 6.8 Effects of processing on the quality of infant formula
      • 6.9 Conclusion
      • 6.10 References
    • 7. Ingredients selection for infant formula
      • Abstract:
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Animal-based ingredients
      • 7.3 Plant-based ingredients
      • 7.4 Selection of ingredients on the basis of their constituents
      • 7.5 Regulations for the selection of new ingredients
      • 7.6 Ingredients as adulterants or contaminants
      • 7.7 Conclusions
      • 7.8 References
    • 8. Processing technology for infant formula
      • Abstract:
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Powdered infant formula
      • 8.3 Liquid infant formula
      • 8.4 Special needs formula
      • 8.5 References
  • Part III: Infant formula quality issues
    • 9. Component interactions and processing damage during the manufacture of infant formula
      • Abstract:
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Component interactions
      • 9.3 Nutritional implications of component interactions
      • 9.4 Conclusion
      • 9.5 References
    • 10. Infant formula quality control
      • Abstract:
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Quality control systems for infant formula
      • 10.3 Microbiological content of infant formula and control measures
      • 10.4 Chemical contaminants of infant formula
      • 10.5 Water and air as sources of contaminants of infant formula
      • 10.6 Quality control of the nutritional content of infant formula
      • 10.7 Conclusions
      • 10.8 References
    • 11. Infant formula product regulation
      • Abstract:
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Food law and the regulation system of the People’s Republic of China
      • 11.3 Food law and the regulation system of Japan
      • 11.4 Food law and the regulation system of the Republic of Korea
      • 11.5 Food law and the regulation system of Australia and New Zealand
      • 11.6 Food law and the regulation system of the United States
      • 11.7 Food law and the regulation system of the European Union
      • 11.8 Summary
      • 11.9 References
    • 12. Infant formula analysis
      • Abstract:
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Regulations, methodologies and validation
      • 12.3 Mixing and sampling: batched product versus dry blended product
      • 12.4 Degradation of vitamins/nutrients in opened packages
      • 12.5 Verification of packaging integrity
      • 12.6 Release, stability, and formula verification testing
      • 12.7 Sampling (AOAC 985.30)
      • 12.8 Gross composition (AOAC 986.25)
      • 12.9 Water-soluble vitamins
      • 12.10 Fat-soluble vitamins
      • 12.11 Minerals
      • 12.12 Other ingredients
      • 12.13 Functional ingredients
      • 12.14 Summary
      • 12.15 References
    • 13. Infant formula and allergy
      • Abstract:
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Types of allergies in infants and contributing factors
      • 13.3 Allergy problems due to ingredients
      • 13.4 Allergy problems due to constituents
      • 13.5 Methods to minimize allergies in infants
      • 13.6 Conclusions
      • 13.7 References
  • Index

Description

Since infant formula substitutes for human milk, its composition must match that of human milk as closely as possible. Quality control of infant formula is also essential to ensure product safety, as infants are particularly vulnerable food consumers. This book reviews the latest research into human milk biochemistry and best practice in infant formula processing technology and quality control.

Key Features

  • The most up to date reference on infant formula processing technology
  • Reviews both human milk biochemistry and infant formula processing technology for broad and applied coverage
  • Focusses exclusively on infant formulae

Readership

Food manufacturers, specifically those in the infant formula industry; Academic and graduate students in the food science field


Details

No. of pages:
420
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857099150
Hardcover ISBN:
9781845697242

Reviews

"...a valuable resource for anyone interested in understanding the technical and functional requirements for a product that is becoming more attractive to many manufacturers and importers around the world." --Australian Dairy Foods


About the Editors

M. Guo Editor

Dr Mingruo Guo is Professor in the Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, University of Vermont, USA. He is highly regarded for his teaching, research and product development in the area of functional foods.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Vermont, USA and Jilin University, People’s Republic of China