Handbook of Food Allergen Detection and Control - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782420125, 9781782420217

Handbook of Food Allergen Detection and Control

1st Edition

Editors: Simon Flanagan
eBook ISBN: 9781782420217
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782420125
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 8th September 2014
Page Count: 448
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Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Food Science, Technology and Nutrition
  • 1: Introduction to food allergy
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction: what is food allergy?
    • 1.2 Other food intolerances
    • 1.3 Food allergy prevalence and patterns
    • 1.4 What is a food allergen?
    • 1.5 Food allergen risk management
    • 1.6 The value of having food allergen data
    • 1.7 Challenges and considerations in food allergen analysis
    • 1.8 Conclusions
  • Part One: Managing allergens in the food chain
    • 2: Traceability of allergenic foods in the food chain
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Legislation, standards and guidance
      • 2.3 Traceability systems
      • 2.4 Analytical methods used in traceability investigations
      • 2.5 Conclusions
    • 3: Food allergen risk assessment and management
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Food allergy as a public health issue
      • 3.3 Risk assessment for food allergens: background and issues
      • 3.4 Development of risk assessment for food allergens
      • 3.5 Practical aspects of risk assessment
      • 3.6 Risk management
      • 3.7 Conclusions
    • 4: Assessment and communication of allergen risks in the food chain
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Principles and methods
      • 4.3 Allergen risk assessment and hazard characterisation
      • 4.4 Risk communication
      • 4.5 Risk assessment to allergen control plan
      • 4.6 Current research and future trends
      • 4.7 Conclusions
    • 5: Hygienic design and cleaning as an allergen control measure
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Hygienic design: regulations and norms
      • 5.3 Hygienic equipment design
      • 5.4 Hygienic building design
      • 5.5 Integrating hygienic systems/hygienic engineering
      • 5.6 Cleaning as an allergen control measure
      • 5.7 Allergen cleaning: verification and validation
    • 6: Effective allergen management practices to reduce allergens in food
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 The retailer’s perspective
      • 6.3 The allergy journey
      • 6.4 Labelling and packaging
      • 6.5 Marks & Spencer packaging evolution
      • 6.6 Allergen management risk assessment
      • 6.7 Marks & Spencer’s risk assessment process
      • 6.8 Factory standards and controls
      • 6.9 Gluten-free
      • 6.10 Next steps
      • Acknowledgements
    • 7: Consumer attitudes to allergens in foods
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Which consumers are avoiding foods and why?
      • 7.3 What information do these consumers need?
      • 7.4 Living with food allergy
      • 7.5 Information from packaging
      • 7.6 Challenges for consumers at different stages of life
      • 7.7 Summary of consumer needs
      • 7.8 How can food suppliers ensure consumer confidence and trust?
      • 7.9 Conclusions and future trends
      • 7.10 Sources of further information and advice
      • Acknowledgements
    • 8: Assessing and managing allergenicity of genetically modified (GM) foods
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Assessing the allergenicity of novel proteins
      • 8.3 Key steps in allergenicity assessment
      • 8.4 Environmental factors affecting allergenicity
      • 8.5 Assessing the allergenicity of whole GM plants
      • 8.6 Assessing the allergenicity of products from GM animals
      • 8.7 Post-market monitoring
      • 8.8 Conclusion
  • Part Two: Detecting allergens in food
    • 9: Sampling for food allergens
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Reasons to sample for food allergens and sampling plans
      • 9.3 Approaches to sampling
      • 9.4 Sample types
      • 9.5 Quality of the sample
      • 9.6 Future trends
    • 10: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for detecting allergens in food
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Principles of an enzyme immunoassay
      • 10.3 Main components of ELISA
      • 10.4 Detection issues relating to particular allergens: egg, milk, nuts, prolamins and glutelins
      • 10.5 Validation, characteristical parameters of ELISA and collaborative studies
      • 10.6 Conclusions
    • 11: Lateral flow devices for detecting allergens in food
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Lateral flow devices
      • 11.3 Development of a lateral flow device
      • 11.4 Key issues in using lateral flow devices
      • 11.5 Future trends
      • 11.6 Conclusions
      • 11.7 Sources of further information and advice
    • 12: Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors for detecting allergens in food
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Development of an SPR food allergen biosensor
      • 12.3 Applications of SPR for food allergen detection: peanuts
      • 12.4 Detection of shellfish toxins with SPR
      • 12.5 High-throughput food allergen profiling with imaging SPR
      • 12.6 Future trends
      • 12.7 Conclusions
    • 13: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for detecting allergens in foods
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Advantages of PCR for allergen detection
      • 13.3 PCR principles and methods
      • 13.4 Multi-allergen detection and quantification with PCR
      • 13.5 PCR performance characteristics
      • 13.6 Conclusions and future trends
    • 14: Optical thin film biochips for detecting allergens in food
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Principles of optical thin film biochips
      • 14.3 Applications for detection of allergenic foods
      • 14.4 Advantages and disadvantages of optical thin film biosensor chip assays
      • 14.5 Future trends
      • 14.6 Conclusions
    • 15: IgE antibody-based analysis for detecting allergens in food
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 General considerations
      • 15.3 IgE antibody-based in vivo assay for food allergen potency assessment
      • 15.4 IgE antibody-based in vitro assays for food allergen potency assessment
      • 15.5 Applications in the detection of peanuts
      • 15.6 Allergosorbent competitive inhibition assay: strengths and weaknesses
      • 15.7 Future trends
      • Appendix: abbreviations
    • 16: Validation, standardisation and harmonisation of analytical methods and test kits for detecting allergens in food
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Different methods for the detection of allergens in food
      • 16.3 Comparing the different methods
      • 16.4 Limitations of the different methods and how they can be overcome
      • 16.5 Importance of validation and good practices
      • 16.6 Challenges of standardisation and harmonisation of analytical methods
      • 16.7 Future trends
  • Part Three: Case studies: detection and control of specific food allergens
    • 17: Detection and control of eggs as a food allergen
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Egg allergy
      • 17.3 Egg allergens
      • 17.4 Detection of egg allergens
      • 17.5 Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)
      • 17.6 Other techniques: western blots, lateral flow and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) devices
      • 17.7 Future trends
      • 17.8 Conclusion
    • 18: Detection and control of soybeans as a food allergen
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Soybeans and their food uses
      • 18.3 Soybean allergy: prevalence and potency
      • 18.4 Clinical manifestations and severity of soybean allergy
      • 18.5 Soybean allergens
      • 18.6 Detection of soy residues
      • 18.7 Control of soy residues in food manufacturing facilities
      • 18.8 Future trends
      • 18.9 Conclusions
      • 18.10 Sources of further information and advice
    • 19: Detection and control of gluten as a food allergen
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Pathogenesis of celiac disease (CD)
      • 19.3 Testing of gluten toxicity
      • 19.4 Current EU labeling and codex guidelines
      • 19.5 Methods for measurement of gluten contamination in foods
      • 19.6 Future trends and summary
    • 20: Detection and control of fish, shellfish and molluscs as food allergens
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Classification of seafood and seafood protein characteristics
      • 20.3 Seafood as allergens
      • 20.4 Epidemiology of seafood allergy
      • 20.5 Manifestations of seafood allergies
      • 20.6 Management of seafood allergies
      • 20.7 Summary and future trends
    • 21: Detection and control of mustard and sesame as food allergens
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Mustard as an allergen
      • 21.3 The major allergic proteins in mustard
      • 21.4 Detection of mustard allergens and markers in food
      • 21.5 Sesame as an allergen
      • 21.6 The major allergic proteins in sesame
      • 21.7 Detection of sesame allergens and markers in food
      • 21.8 Future trends
  • Index

Description

Allergens in food and their detection, management and elimination constitute a key issue for food manufacturers, especially in terms of safety. This book reviews current and emerging technologies for detecting and reducing allergens, as well as issues such as traceability, regulation and consumer attitudes. Following an introductory chapter by a distinguished expert, part one covers allergen management throughout the food chain. Part two details current and emerging methods of allergen detection in food, and part three covers methods for reducing and eliminating allergens in food. Finally, part four focuses on the control and detection of individual food allergens and the risks each one presents in food manufacture.

Key Features

  • Reviews current and emerging technologies for detecting and reducing allergens, as well as issues such as traceability, regulation and consumer attitudes
  • Covers allergen management throughout the food chain and reviews current and emerging methods of allergen detection
  • Examines methods for reducing and eliminating allergens in food and provides a detailed overview of the control and detection of individual food allergens

Readership

Quality control and safety/risk assessment personnel, product development personnel in the area of allergy-specific food, R&D managers in allergen control


Details

No. of pages:
448
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782420217
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782420125

About the Editors

Simon Flanagan Editor

Simon Flanagan, Reading Scientific Services Ltd (RSSL), UK

Affiliations and Expertise

Reading Scientific Services Ltd (RSSL), UK