Food Waste Recovery

Food Waste Recovery

Processing Technologies and Industrial Techniques

1st Edition - July 3, 2015
There is a Newer Edition Available
  • Editor: Charis Galanakis
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128003510
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128004197

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Description

Food Waste Recovery: Processing Technologies and Industrial Techniques acts as a guide to recover valuable components of food by-products and recycle them inside the food chain, in an economic and sustainable way. The book investigates all the relevant recovery issues and compares different techniques to help you advance your research and develop new applications. Strong coverage of the different technologies is included, while keeping a balance between the characteristics of current conventional and emerging technologies. This is an essential reference for research outcomes.

Key Features

  • Presents a holistic methodology (the so-called "5-Stages Universal Recovery Process") and a general approach (the so-called "Universal Recovery Strategy") to ensure optimized management of the available technologies and recapture of different high added-value compounds from any waste source
  • Includes characteristics, safety and cost issues of conventional and emerging technologies, the benefits of their application in industry, and commercialized applications of real market products
  • Demonstrates all aspects of the recovery process such as preservation of the substrate, yield optimization, preservation of functionality of the target compounds during processing, and more

Readership

Food technologists, researchers, scientists, engineers, professionals and students working or studying in food and by-products processing area

Table of Contents

    • List of Contributors
    • Preface
    • Section I: Introduction
      • Chapter 1: Food waste management, valorization, and sustainability in the food industry
        • Abstract
        • 1.1. Introduction
        • 1.2. Definitions of “food waste” and “food loss”
        • 1.3. Quantities of lost and wasted food and impact on food and nutrition security
        • 1.4. Prospects
        • 1.5. Origin of food waste and food loss
        • 1.6. Management and valorization strategies
        • 1.7. Treatment of food waste
        • 1.8. How food waste recovery improves sustainability of food systems
      • Chapter 2: Classification and target compounds
        • Abstract
        • 2.1. Introduction
        • 2.2. Cereals
        • 2.3. Root and tubers
        • 2.4. Oilcrops and pulses
        • 2.5. Fruit and vegetables
        • 2.6. Meat products
        • 2.7. Fisheries by-products
        • 2.8. Dairy products
      • Chapter 3: The universal recovery strategy
        • Abstract
        • 3.1. Introduction
        • 3.2. Characteristics of target compounds
        • 3.3. Substrate macro- and microstructure
        • 3.4. Selection of the appropriate solvent
        • 3.5. Selection of the recovery stages
        • 3.6. Selection of the appropriate technologies
    • Section II: Conventional techniques
      • Chapter 4: Conventional macroscopic pretreatment
        • Abstract
        • 4.1. Introduction
        • 4.2. Size reduction of solids
        • 4.3. Thermal and vacuum concentration
        • 4.4. Mechanical separation (centrifugation/mechanical expression)
        • 4.5. Freeze drying
        • 4.6. Microfiltration
      • Chapter 5: Conventional macro- and micromolecules separation
        • Abstract
        • 5.1. Introduction
        • 5.2. Ethanol precipitation
        • 5.3. Ultrafiltration
        • 5.4. Isoelectric solubilization/precipitation
        • 5.5. Extrusion
        • 5.6. Conclusions
      • Chapter 6: Conventional extraction
        • Abstract
        • 6.1. Introduction
        • 6.2. Solvent extraction
        • 6.3. Acid, alkali, and enzyme extraction
        • 6.4. Microwave-assisted extraction
        • 6.5. Steam distillation and hydrodistillation
        • 6.6. Supercritical fluid extraction
        • 6.7. Scale-up and economic issues
        • 6.8. Future perspectives
      • Chapter 7: Conventional purification and isolation
        • Abstract
        • 7.1. Introduction
        • 7.2. Adsorption
        • 7.3. Chromatography
        • 7.4. Nanofiltration
        • 7.5. Electrodialysis
      • Chapter 8: Conventional product formation
        • Abstract
        • 8.1. Introduction
        • 8.2. Technological functionality and quality properties of food waste components
        • 8.3. Product design by emulsification
        • 8.4. Product design by microencapsulation
    • Section III: Emerging technologies
      • Chapter 9: Emerging macroscopic pretreatment
        • Abstract
        • 9.1. Introduction
        • 9.2. Foam-mat drying
        • 9.3. Radio-frequency drying
        • 9.4. Electro-osmotic drying
        • 9.5. Low-temperature plasma
        • 9.6. High hydrostatic pressure
        • 9.7. Conclusions
      • Chapter 10: Emerging macro- and micromolecules separation
        • Abstract
        • 10.1. Introduction
        • 10.2. Colloidal gas aphrons (CGA)
        • 10.3. Ultrasound-assisted crystallization
        • 10.4. Pressurized microwave extraction
      • Chapter 11: Emerging extraction
        • Abstract
        • 11.1. Introduction
        • 11.2. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE)
        • 11.3. Laser ablation
        • 11.4. Pulsed electric field (PEF)
        • 11.5. High voltage electrical discharge
        • 11.6. Emerging membrane extraction
      • Chapter 12: Emerging purification and isolation
        • Abstract
        • 12.1. Introduction
        • 12.2. Magnetic fishing
        • 12.3. Aqueous two-phase system
        • 12.4. Ion-exchange membrane chromatography
        • 12.5. Conclusions
      • Chapter 13: Emerging product formation
        • Abstract
        • 13.1. Introduction
        • 13.2. Nanocapsules
        • 13.3. Nanoencapsulation methods and scale-up
        • 13.4. Nanoemulsions
        • 13.5. Nanocrystals
        • 13.6. Pulsed fluidized bed agglomeration
    • Section IV: Commercialization aspects and applications
      • Chapter 14: Cost and safety issues of emerging technologies against conventional techniques
        • Abstract
        • 14.1. Introduction
        • 14.2. Assumptions and calculations
        • 14.3. Conventional techniques
        • 14.4. Emerging technologies
        • 14.5. Conclusions
        • Acknowledgments
      • Chapter 15: Patented and commercialized applications
        • Abstract
        • 15.1. Scale-up and commercialization problems
        • 15.2. Protection of intellectual properties
        • 15.3. Applications and market products
        • 15.4. Potential use of emerging technologies
        • 15.5. Conclusions
      • Chapter 16: Recovery and applications of enzymes from food wastes
        • Abstract
        • 16.1. Introduction
        • 16.2. Enzymes from plant food processing wastes
        • 16.3. Fish and seafood processing wastes
        • 16.4. Future prospects
    • Subject Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 412
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2015
  • Published: July 3, 2015
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128003510
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128004197

About the Editor

Charis Galanakis

Dr. Galanakis is an interdisciplinary scientist. He is the research and innovation director of Galanakis Laboratories (Chania, Greece) and the coordinator of the Food Waste Recovery Group of the ISEKI-Food Association (Vienna, Austria). He serves as an expert evaluator and monitor of international and regional funded programs and proposals, whereas he is an editorial board member and subject editor of Food and Bioproducts Processing and Food Research International. He has edited nine books and published ~100 articles

Affiliations and Expertise

Galanakis Laboratories, Chania, Greece