Food, Medical, and Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials

Food, Medical, and Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials

1st Edition - March 24, 2022

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  • Editors: Veeriah Jegatheesan, Nandika Bandara, Preetam Sarkar, Angana Sarkar, Kunal Pal
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128230749
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128228586

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Description

Food, Medical, and Environmental Applications of Nanomaterials is designed to cover different types of nanomaterials that have applications related to the environment, food and medicine. It is an important resource for materials scientists and bioengineers looking to learn more about the applications of nanomaterials for sustainable development applications. Nanoscale materials possess excellent properties that have been explored in the areas of biomedicals, food, agriculture, the environment, catalysis, sensing and energy storage. Examples of these new applications include smart and active food packaging, nanobiosensors, bioremediation, wastewater treatment, implant coatings, tissue engineering, delivery systems for food and pharmaceutical applications, and food safety.

Key Features

  • Helps readers make decisions on the suitability and appropriateness of a synthetic route and characterization technique for a particular nanosystem
  • Enables readers to analyze and compare experimental data and extract in-depth information about the physical properties of the polymeric gels using mathematical models
  • Teaches users about the applications of nanomaterials for sustainable development applications

Readership

Materials scientists and engineers

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Fabrication of nanomaterials
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Fabrication of nanomaterials
  • 3: Top-down fabrication methods
  • 4: Bottom-up fabrication methods
  • 5: Other common methods available for nanomaterials production
  • 6: Nanocomposites
  • 7: Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Nanoparticles and nanofluids: Characteristics and behavior aspects
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanoparticle aggregation and dispersion behavior
  • 3: Physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles
  • 4: Interactions between nanoparticles
  • 5: Properties of nanofluid
  • 6: Mass transfer in nanofluids
  • 7: Future trends
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Robust organometallic gold nanoparticles in nanomedicine engineering of proteins
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: BSA conjugated gold-carbon nanoparticles with outstanding robustness and hemocompatibility
  • 3: Green and cytocompatible carboxyl-modified gold-lysozyme antibacterial
  • 4: Inhibition of amyloid fibrillation at carboxyl-tailored gold-aryl nanoparticles
  • 5: Protein-coated gold nanoparticles: Green and chemical synthesis routes and their cellular uptake
  • 6: Computational methods
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Polysaccharide-based nanomaterials
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Agar nanoparticles
  • 3: Agarose nanoparticle
  • 4: Alginate nanoparticles
  • 5: Carrageenan nanoparticles
  • 6: Chitin nanoparticles
  • 7: Chitooligosaccharide nanoparticles
  • 8: Chitosan nanoparticles
  • 9: Cellulose nanoparticles
  • 10: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Lipid-based nanostructures in food applications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction: Potential of lipid-based nanostructure
  • 2: Type of lipid nanostructures used in food industries
  • 3: Different synthesis methodologies
  • 4: Application of lipid nanostructure in food industries
  • 5: Future of lipid-based nanostructures
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Bio-based multifunctional nanomaterials: Synthesis and applications
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgement
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Biomolecules in nanomaterial synthesis
  • 3: Microbial molecules in nanomaterial synthesis
  • 4: Plant resources in nanoparticle synthesis
  • 5: Template-based synthesis
  • 6: NP shape control with biomolecular systems
  • 7: Extensive use of nanoparticles
  • 8: Scope and applications of as-synthesized NPs
  • 9: Summary and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Nanocomposites in food packaging
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Fabrication methods of nanocomposites
  • 3: Types of nanoparticles
  • 4: Essential oils
  • 5: Effect of the incorporation of nanoparticles and EOs on the properties of the nanocomposite packaging films
  • 6: Regulatory issues
  • 7: Concluding remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Nano delivery systems for food bioactives
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Requirement of nano delivery system
  • 3: Properties of the delivery system
  • 4: Nano delivery system
  • 5: Conclusion and future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Nanostructures for improving food structure and functionality
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Overview of methods for nanostructure formations
  • 3: Sources of biopolymers for nanostructure development
  • 4: Application on nanostructures in food systems
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Nanotechnology in microbial food safety
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Interaction between nanoparticles and microbes
  • 3: Antimicrobial nanocoating
  • 4: Anti-fouling surface
  • 5: Antimicrobial nanomaterials for biofilm
  • 6: Nanoencapsulation
  • 7: Nanophotosensitizer
  • 8: Application of nanotechnology in microbial food safety
  • 9: Risk assessment
  • 10: Regulatory and legislative aspects
  • 11: Final remarks
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Electroconductive nanofibrillar biocomposite platforms for cardiac tissue engineering
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanotopologies and electrical stimulation—Intrinsic biophysical determinant of CMs
  • 3: Strategies for fabricating electroactive nanofibrous platforms
  • 4: Recent developments in electroconductive nanofibrillar platforms for CTE
  • 5: Conclusion and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Impacts of nanotechnology in tissue engineering
  • Abstract
  • 1: Nanomaterials for skin repair and regeneration
  • 2: Nanomaterial technology for eye regeneration
  • 3: Nanostructured biomaterial used in bone regeneration
  • 4: Nanomaterials in management of chronic respiratory diseases and mucosal injury
  • 5: Biomaterials in cardiovascular tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Piezoelectric nanomaterials for biomedical applications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction and origin of piezoelectricity
  • 2: Preparation of piezoelectric materials
  • 3: Biomedical applications of piezoelectric nanomaterials
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Nanotechnology-based interventions for interactions with the immune system
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Emerging clinical needs of human immune physiology
  • 3: Nanotechnology and nanoparticles for vaccination
  • 4: Treatment of immunosuppressive diseases with nanoparticles
  • 5: Cancer treatment with nanotechnology by immune modulation
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Polycaprolactone-based shape memory polymeric nanocomposites for biomedical applications
  • Abstract
  • Graphical Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: An insight of shape-memory polymers and shape memory effect
  • 3: Significance of SMPs in biomedical applications
  • 4: Synthesis and properties of PCL
  • 5: PCL-based shape memory polymeric nanocomposites
  • 6: Scope and future perspective
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Nanoemulsions for antitumor activity
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanoemulsion and MDR
  • 3: Application and different types of cancer therapy
  • 4: Theragonostic application of nanoemulsion
  • 5: Future prospects
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17: Nanomaterials for aging and cosmeceutical applications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Classifications of nanocosmeceuticals
  • 3: Nanocosmeceuticals mechanisms of action
  • 4: Toxicity of nanoparticles for cosmeceuticals
  • 5: Safety assessment of nanomaterials in cosmetic industry
  • 6: Future perspective and recommendations
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Nano-formulations in drug delivery
  • Abstract
  • 1: Nanotechnology in nano-formulations in drug delivery
  • 2: Morphologies and their properties in drug delivery
  • 3: Preparation of nano-formulations
  • 4: Different applications of nano-formulations
  • 5: Biocompatibility and mechanism of some system drug delivery
  • 6: Perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Nano-materials as biosensor for heavy metal detection
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Biosensor
  • 3: Advancement on nanomaterial-based biosensor
  • 4: Pros and cons
  • 5: Future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Smart nano-biosensors in sustainable agriculture and environmental applications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Principle of nano-biosensors
  • 3: Types of nano-bio sensors
  • 4: Nanostructures used in sensors
  • 5: Nano-biosensors for environmental and agricultural application
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 570
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: March 24, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128230749
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128228586

About the Editors

Veeriah Jegatheesan

Veeriah Jegatheesan is Professor of Environmental Engineering and Director of Water:, Effect Technologies and Tools (WETT) Research Centre at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia. His research focuses on the application of membrane bioreactors, sugar cane juiceclarification, sea water desalination and the treatment of mine tailing ponds.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor of Environmental Engineering and Director of Water, Effect Technologies and Tools (WETT) Research Centre at RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia

Nandika Bandara

Assistant Professor & Canada Research Chair in Food Proteins and Bioproducts at the University of Manitoba, Canada. His research focuses on Integrating material science and nanotechnology for improving bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy. of bioactives and drugs using protein & lipid-based delivery systems.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor & Canada Research Chair in Food Proteins and Bioproducts at the University of Manitoba, Canada

Preetam Sarkar

Dr. Preetam Sarkar is an Assistant Professor of Food Sciences at the Department of Food Process Engineering, National Institute of Technology Rourkela, Odisha, India. He completed his Ph.D. in Food Sciences from Purdue University, USA. The research at Dr. Sarkar’s lab at NIT Rourkela focuses on the development of delivery vehicles such as emulsions, films and coatings, for the protection of bioactive compounds such as antimicrobial agents for food safety applications. He has published 30 articles in SCI journals, 10 book chapters, and co-edited 3 books.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Food Process Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India

Angana Sarkar

Prof. Angana Sarkar pursued her graduation in Agricultural Engineering from Bidhan Chandra Krishi Viswasvidyalaya, West Bengal, India, followed by post-graduation in Biotechnology & Biochemical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India 2008. Later, she completed her Ph.D. in Environmental Biotechnlogy from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India. Subsequently she joined National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India in the year 2015 as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biotechnology & Medical Engineering. Her research area is mainly focused on (i) Pollutant detection using biosensors, (ii) Groundwater bioremediation, (iii) Waste water (domestic and industrial) treatment (iv) Solid waste management by bio-refinery approach to produce environmental waste to value like bioethanol, pigment, biofertilizars etc. and (iv) Hydrocarbon and other organic pollutants degradation.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology and MEdical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India

Kunal Pal

Dr. Pal pursued his graduation in Pharmacy from the University of Delhi, New Delhi, India in the year 2002, followed by post-graduation in Biomedical Engineering from Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India in the year 2004. Later, he did his Ph.D. in Materials Science from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, India, in the year 2006. Subsequently, he joined Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada as a post-doctoral fellow in the year 2007. During his tenure at Ryerson University, he served as Vice-Chair (Elect), HQPA, AFMNet Network of Excellence, Canada. He joined the National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India in the year 2009 as an Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering. He is currently the Professor-in-Charge of Medical Electronics and Instrumentation Laboratory in the Department of Biotechnology and Medical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India. His major research interests revolve around Biomedical Signal Processing and Biomedical Equipment Design. He is also working in the fields of soft materials and controlled drug delivery. He has published more than 100 publications in SCI cited journals of high repute, Book Chapters, Edited Books, and papers in peer-reviewed conferences. He is a very well-cited researcher having more than 2500 citations.

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor-in-Charge, Medical Electronics and Instrumentation Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology and Medical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Rourkela, India

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