Table of Contents

Contributors Acknowledgements 1 Quality 1.1 Origins and Meanings of Quality 1.2 Definition of Quality 1.3 Commercial Quality 1.4 Quality of Food Products 1.5 The Experience of Coffee Consumption 1.6 The Quality of Espresso Coffee 1.7 Definition of Espresso 1.8 Conclusions References 2 The Plant 2.1 Origin, Production and Botany 2.2 Variety Development 2.3 Agronomy 2.4 Biochemical Ecology 2.5 Molecular Genetics of Coffee References 3 The Raw Bean 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Harvesting 3.3 Processing of the Harvest 3.4 Drying 3.5 Final Processing for Export and Roasting 3.6 Logistics 3.7 Defects 3.8 Classification: Physical and Sensorial Analysis 3.9 Blending 3.10 Decaffeination 3.11 Raw Bean Composition References and Further Reading 4 Roasting 4.1 The Process 4.2 Roasting Techniques 4.3 Changes Produced by Roasting 4.4 Volatile Aroma Compounds 4.5 Melanoidins 4.6 Contaminants References 5 Grinding 5.1 Theory of Fracture Mechanics 5.2 Coffee Grinders 5.3 Methods for Measuring Ground Product Fineness 5.4 Parameters Influencing Grinding 5.5 Physico-Chemical Modifications Due to Grinding References 6 Storage and Packaging 6.1 Physical and Chemical Changes of Roasted Coffee during Storage 6.2 Packaging of Roasted Coffee References 7 Percolation 7.1 Conceptual Definitions 7.2 Physical and Chemical Characterization of the Percolation Process 7.3 Modeling of the Percolation Process 7.4 The Espresso Machine 7.5 Parameters Influencing Percolation References 8 The Cup 8.1 Physical and Chemical Characterization of the Espresso Beverage 8.2 Organoleptic Characteristics of Espresso (Practical Aspects) 8.3 Espresso Definition Again 8.4 Espresso–Milk Mixes Re

Details

No. of pages:
398
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2004
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Electronic ISBN:
9780080575360
Print ISBN:
9780123703712

About the editor

Rinantonio Viani

After graduating from the University of Pisa, Riantonio Viani studied at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, CA, USA. He went on to carry out postdoctoral research at Duke University, NC, USA, before moving to the Nestle Research Laboratories in Switzerland. He was appointed Scientific Advisor of the Technical Division of Nestle in the Coffee and Beverages Scientific Business Unit, and is former Chairman of Physiological Effects of Coffee and former President of ASIC.