Description

The period of adolescence involves growth, adaptation, and dramatic reorganization in almost every aspect of social and psychological development. The Encyclopedia of Adolescence offers an exhaustive and comprehensive review of current theory and research findings pertaining to this critical decade of life. Leading scientists offer accessible and easily readable reviews of biological, social, educational, occupational, and cultural factors that shape adolescent development. Issues in normative development, individual differences, and psychopathology/maladjustment are reviewed. Over 130 chapters are included, each covering a specific aspect or issue of adolescence. The chapters trace differences in the course of adolescence in different nations and among youth with different backgrounds.

The encyclopedia brings together cross-disciplinary contributors, including academic researchers, biologists, psychiatrists, sociologists, anthropologists and public policy experts, and will include authors from around the world. Each article features an in-depth analysis of current information on the topic, along with a glossary, suggested readings for further information, and cross-references to related encyclopedia articles. The volumes offer an unprecedented resource for all audiences, providing a more comprehensive understanding of general topics compared to other reference works on the subject.

Available both in print and online via SciVerse Science Direct.

Key Features

  • Winner of the 2011 PROSE Award for Multivolume Reference in Humanities & Social Science from the Association of American Publishers; and named a 2012 Outstanding Academic Title by the American Library Association's Choice publication
  • Brings together cross-disciplinary contributors, including developmental psychologists, educational psychologists, clinical psychologists, biologists, psychiatrists, sociologists, anthropologists and public policy experts
  • Published both in print and via Elsevier's ScienceDirect™ online platform

Readership

Post-graduate researchers and practitioners in psychiatry, psychology, medicine and pediatrics, and advanced undergraduates

Table of Contents

  • Editor Biographies
  • Editorial Advisory Board
  • Permission Acknowledgments
  • Preface
  • Article Titles
    • A
      • Academic Achievement
        • Abstract
        • Introduction
        • Measures of Academic Achievement: Strengths and Weaknesses
        • Age Trends in Achievement by Subject Area
        • Factors Predictive of Achievement
        • Gender, Racial, and Ethnic Differences in Achievement
        • Implications for Improving Achievement
        • See also
        • Glossary
        • Further Reading
        • Relevant Websites
      • Achievement Motivation
        • Abstract
        • Introduction
        • Current Achievement Motivation Theories and Constructs
        • Development of Achievement Motivation
        • Group Differences in Motivation
        • Parental Influences
        • School Influences
        • Peers and Motivation During Adolescence
        • Conclusion
        • See also
        • Glossary
        • Further Reading
      • Addictions in Adolescence
        • Abstract
        • Introduction
        • Prevalence and Epidemiology
        • Consequences of Use
        • Risk Factors for Addiction
        • Efforts to Prevent Addiction
        • Addiction Treatment
        • Conclusions and Future Developments
        • See also
        • Glossary
        • Further Reading
      • Adolescence, Theories of
        • Abstract
        • Introduction
        • Families of Theories
        • Why So Many Theories?
        • Evolving Need for New Theoretical Approaches That Address Emerging Knowledge and the Questions That Such Knowledge Inspire
        • See also
        • Glossary
        • Further Reading
        • Relevant Websites
      • Adolescent Decision-Making
        • Abstract
        • Introduction
        • What Is Competent Decision-Making?
        • Judgment and Decision-Making
        • Factors Influencing Adolescent Decision-Making
        • Summary and Implications
        • Se

Details

No. of pages:
1294
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2011
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
Print ISBN:
9780123739155
eBook ISBN:
9780123739513

About the editors

B. Bradford Brown

Dr. Bradford Brown is Professor of Human Development and former Chair of the Department of Educational Psychology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received an A.B. in sociology from Princeton University and Ph.D. in human development from the University of Chicago before joining the faculty of the University of Wisconsin in 1979. Dr. Brown's research has focused on adolescent peer relations. He is especially well known for his work on teenage peer groups and peer pressure and their influence on school achievement, social interaction pasterns, and social adjustment. He is the former Editor of the Journal of Research on Adolescence and a past member of the Executive Council of the Society for Research on Adolescence. He also chaired (2006-2008) the SRA Study Group on Parental Involvement in Adolescent Peer Relations. He is the co-editor or co-author of five books, including The Development of Romantic Relationships in Adolescence (with Wyndol Furman and Candice Feiring), The World's Youth: Adolescence in 8 Regions of the Globe (with Reed Larson and T. S. Saraswathi), and Linking Parents and Family to Adolescent Peer Relations: Ethnic and Cultural Considerations (with Nina Mounts). Dr. Brown has served as a consultant for numerous groups, including the Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development, the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, the National Academy of Sciences Board on Science Education as well as the Board on Children, Youth and Families, and the Blue Ribbons Schools program of the U.S. Department of Education.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Wisconsin-Madison - USA

Mitchell Prinstein

Mitchell J. Prinstein, Ph.D. is a Bowman and Gordon Gray Distinguished Term Professor and the Director of Clinical Psychology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Miami and completed his internship and postdoctoral fellowship at the Brown University Clinical Psychology Training Consortium. Dr. Prinstein's research examines interpersonal models of internalizing symptoms and health risk behaviors among adolescents, with a specific focus on the unique role of peer relationships in the developmental psychopathology of depression and self-injury. He is the PI on several past and active grants from the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Child and Human Development, and several private foundations. He has served as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, an editorial board member for several developmental psychopathology journals, and a member of the NIH Study Section on Psychosocial Development, Risk, and Prevention. Mitch has received several national and university-based awards recognizing his contributions to research (American Psychological Association Society of Clinical Psychology Theodore Blau Early Career Award, Columbia University/Brickell Award for research on suicidality, APA Fellow of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology), teaching (UNC Chapel Hill Tanner Award for Undergraduate Teaching), and professional development of graduate students (American Psychological Association of Graduate Students Raymond D. Fowler Award).

Affiliations and Expertise

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill - USA

Awards

PROSE Award 2011, Multivolume Reference: Humanities & Social Science, American Association of Publishers
CHOICE Outstanding Academic Titles, 2012, American Library Association

Reviews

"2011 PROSE Award Winner for Multivolume Reference/Humanities and Social Science"

"Organizing any reference work is a demanding task, especially when providing a worldwide overview of what is known about adolescence. This innovative encyclopedia, organized around adolescent issues and experiences, uses a three-pronged framework for its 125 broad topical essays… The detailed index points to specific terms within the topics. The highly accomplished contributors come from all relevant disciplines and many countries. The comprehensive essays are logically presented and clearly written. They will serve as excellent introductions for a wide range of readers. This set is also available electronically on the ScienceDirect platform (CH, Sep'06, 44-0034). Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers." --CHOICE