Sustainable Economic Development - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128003473, 9780128004166

Sustainable Economic Development

1st Edition

Resources, Environment, and Institutions

Editors: Arsenio Balisacan Ujjayant Chakravorty Majah-Leah Ravago
eBook ISBN: 9780128004166
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128003473
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 25th September 2014
Page Count: 532
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Description

Sustainable Economic Development: Resources, Environment, and Institutions presents 25 articles that lay the foundations of sustainable development in a way that facilitates effective policy design. The editors mix broad thematic papers with focused micro-papers, balancing theories with policy designs.
The book begins with two sections on sustainable development principles and practice and on specific settings where sustainable development is practiced. Two more sections illuminate institutions, governance, and political economy. Additional sections cover sustainable development and agriculture, and risk and economic security, including disaster management. This rich source of information should appeal to any institution involved in development work, and to development practitioners grappling with an array of difficult on-the-ground developmental challenges.

Key Features

  • Analyzes policies that move markets and resource use patterns towards achieving sustainability
  • Articles are kaleidoscopic in scope and creativity
  • Authors embody extraordinary diversity and qualifications

Readership

Upper-division undergraduates, graduate students, and professionals worldwide working on risk, resource, and policy issues concerned with sustainable development.

Table of Contents

  • Dedication
  • About the Editors
  • About the Authors
  • Foreword
  • Preface and Acknowledgments
  • Section 1: Introduction and Synthesis
    • Chapter 1. The Principles and Practice of Sustainable Economic Development: Overview and Synthesis
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Resource Management and Sustainable Development
      • 1.3 Institutions, Governance, and Political Economy
      • 1.4 The Nature, Causes, and Consequences of Agricultural Development Policy
      • 1.5 Development, Vulnerability, and Poverty Reduction
      • 1.6 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 2. Reflections on the Foundations of Development Policy Analysis
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Behavioral Foundations for Agricultural Development Policy
      • 2.3 Organizational Foundations for Development Policy Analysis: The New Institutional Economics
      • 2.4 Modern Theories of Market and Institutional Failure: Shocks, Traps, Nets, and Ladders
      • 2.5 The Anatomy of Specialization
      • 2.6 Black-Hole Economics
      • References
  • Section 2: Resources, Environment, and Sustainable Development
    • Chapter 3. Scarcity, Security, and Sustainable Development
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Scarcity and Security
      • 3.3 Sustainable Development: What Is It Anyway?
      • 3.4 Trilogies, Triads, and Triangles
      • 3.5 Research Opportunities
      • 3.6 Thoughts on Economic Diplomacy and Education
      • References
      • Technical Appendix
    • Chapter 4. The Economics of Fossil Fuels and Pollution
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 The Framework with Nonrenewable Resource and a Ceiling on the Stock of Pollution
      • 4.3 Ceiling with Fossil Fuels with Different Pollution Intensities
      • 4.4 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 5. Integrated Groundwater Resource Management
      • 5.1 Groundwater Management: From Sustainable Yield to Dynamic Optimization
      • 5.2 Optimal Management of a Single Groundwater Aquifer
      • 5.3 Extensions and Exceptions to the Pearce Equation
      • 5.4 Open Access and the Gisser–Sánchez Effect
      • 5.5 Policy Implications and Directions for Further Research
      • References
    • Chapter 6. Optimal Joint Management of Interdependent Resources: Groundwater Versus Kiawe (Prosopis pallida)
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Groundwater–Kiawe Management Framework
      • 6.3 An Application to the Kona Coast of Hawai’i
      • 6.4 Results
      • 6.5 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
      • Appendix
    • Chapter 7. Win–Win Solutions for Reforestation and Maize Farming: A Case Study of Nan, Thailand
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Maize Farming in Nan Province
      • 7.3 Value of Community Forest Products
      • 7.4 Farmers’ Incentive to Convert Forest to Maize Farm
      • 7.5 Limitations of Current Government Policies
      • 7.6 Alternative Win–Win Policies
      • 7.7 Conclusion
      • References
  • Section 3: Institutions, Governance, and Political Economy
    • Chapter 8. The Role of Institutions in Natural Resource Use
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Institution, Resource Use, and Resource Scarcity: Debates in the Literature
      • 8.3 Optimal Institutions Given the Cost of Institutional Change
      • 8.4 Institutional Choice in Equilibrium
      • 8.5 Research Opportunities on Resource Governance
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 9. Public Choice and the Generalized Resource Curse
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Other Boom Sources
      • 9.3 Mechanisms by Which Abundance Can Become a Curse
      • 9.4 Modeling the Curse of Abundance
      • 9.5 Rent-Seeking Effects on Public Policies
      • 9.6 All That Curses Is Not Gold: Implication for the Philippines
      • 9.7 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 10. Governing Commercial Agriculture in Africa: The Challenges of Coordinating Investments and Selecting Investors
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Capturing the Productivity Growth Potential Through Commercial Agriculture
      • 10.3 Coordinating Investments and Selecting Investors for Better Governance of Commercial Agriculture
      • 10.4 Coordinating with Communities and Local Stakeholders in Governing Commercial Agriculture
      • 10.5 Governance Beyond Governments
      • 10.6 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 11. Land Confiscations and Land Reform in Natural-Order States
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Confiscations in Early Modern Europe and Its Offshoots
      • 11.3 Origins of Early Modern Confiscations
      • 11.4 Redistribution and Sale of Confiscated Lands
      • 11.5 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 12. Regional Integration and Illicit Economy in Fragile Nations: Perspectives from Afghanistan and Myanmar
      • 12.1 Economic Framework for Illicit Activities and Its Cross-Border Context
      • 12.2 Afghanistan
      • 12.3 Myanmar
      • 12.4 A Way Forward for Policy Analysis
      • References
      • Appendix Notes on Harmful Drugs
    • Chapter 13. Corruption, Transactions Costs, and Network Relationships: Governance Challenges for Thailand
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 The Setting: Political and Administrative Reforms and the Asian Economic Crisis
      • 13.3 Network Relationships, Transactions Costs, and Corruption
      • 13.4 Reducing Connected Dealings and Improving Procurement in Thailand
      • 13.5 Conclusion
      • References
      • Further Reading
  • Section 4: The Nature, Causes, and Consequences of Agricultural Development Policy
    • Chapter 14. The Role of Agricultural Economists in Sustaining Bad Programs
      • References
    • Chapter 15. Agricultural R&D Policy and Long-Run Food Security
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Returns to Agricultural R&D
      • 15.3 A New World Order for Agricultural R&D Spending
      • 15.4 Prices and Productivity: Longer Term Patterns and Prospects
      • 15.5 Implications of Alternative Productivity Paths for the World’s Poor
      • 15.6 Implications of Alternative Productivity Paths: Quantitative Illustration
      • 15.7 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 16. Energy and Agriculture: Evolving Dynamics and Future Implications
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Key Linkages Between Energy and Agriculture
      • 16.3 Key Examples of Energy–Agriculture Linkages
      • 16.4 Empirical Illustrations of Energy–Agriculture Linkages
      • 16.5 Policy Implications of Food–Energy Interactions
      • 16.6 Conclusion
      • References
      • Technical Annex A: Derivations of Conceptual Models
    • Chapter 17. Trends and Fluctuations in Agricultural Price Distortions
      • 17.1 Background
      • 17.2 Indicators of National Distortions to Agricultural Prices
      • 17.3 National Distortions to Farmer Incentives: Trends Since the Mid-1950s
      • 17.4 Government Responses to Fluctuations and Spikes in International Food Prices
      • 17.5 Policy Implications and Concluding Remarks
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
    • Chapter 18. Getting the Price of Thai Rice Right: Episode II
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Origins of the PMS
      • 18.3 Price Elasticity of Demand for the Export of Thai Rice
      • 18.4 PMS Outcomes
      • 18.5 Challenges to the PMS
      • 18.6 Negative Outcomes of the PMS
      • 18.7 Domestic Politics
      • 18.8 Policy Recommendations
      • 18.9 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 19. Philippine Rice Self-Sufficiency Program: Pitfalls and Remedies
      • 19.1 Rice Self-Sufficiency and Food Security
      • 19.2 Why Countries Pursue Self-Sufficiency in Rice
      • 19.3 Philippine Rice Self-Sufficiency Plan
      • 19.4 Pitfalls of the Program
      • 19.5 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 20. Production Specialization and Market Participation of Smallholder Agricultural Households in Developing Countries
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Literature Review
      • 20.3 Conceptual Framework and Empirical Model
      • 20.4 Data and Description of Production and Marketing Environment
      • 20.5 Econometric Results
      • 20.6 Conclusion
      • References
  • Section 5: Development, Vulnerability, and Poverty Reduction
    • Chapter 21. Deviant Behavior: A Century of Philippine Industrialization
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 The Philippines and the Competition: Catching Up Since 1870
      • 21.3 Unconditional Industrial Convergence
      • 21.4 Understanding the Philippines’ Deviant Behavior
      • 21.5 Deviant Behavior and Path Dependence
      • 21.6 Future Research
      • References
      • Appendix 1
      • Appendix 2
    • Chapter 22. Bundling Drought Tolerance and Index Insurance to Reduce Rural Household Vulnerability to Drought
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Drought Risk, Vulnerability, and Development Interventions
      • 22.3 DT and Drought II: Prospects and Complementarity
      • 22.4 Calibrating and Evaluating a DT–II Bundle for Maize in Ecuador
      • 22.5 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 23. Have Natural Disasters Become Deadlier?
      • 23.1 Introduction
      • 23.2 Issues
      • 23.3 Data
      • 23.4 Discussion
      • 23.5 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
      • Annex 1
      • Annex 2
      • Annex 3
    • Chapter 24. The Growth–Poverty Nexus: Multidimensional Poverty in the Philippines
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Empirical Approach
      • 24.3 Household Data and Deprivation Dimensions
      • 24.4 What Has Been Happening to Poverty in Recent Years?
      • 24.5 Poverty Profile from the Lens of MPI
      • 24.6 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
      • Annex Tables
    • Chapter 25. Poverty Reduction and the Composition of Growth in the Mekong Economies
      • 25.1 Introduction
      • 25.2 Economic Growth
      • 25.3 Poverty Reduction
      • 25.4 The Growth–Poverty Nexus
      • 25.5 Estimation Results
      • 25.6 Conclusion
      • Acknowledgments
      • References
      • Appendix
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
532
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128004166
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128003473

About the Editor

Arsenio Balisacan

Arsenio Balisacan is a Professor of Economics at the UP School of Economics (on secondment) and Secretary of Socioeconomic Planning in the Cabinet of President Benigno S. Aquino III, Republic of the Philippines.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of the Philippines

Ujjayant Chakravorty

Ujjayant Chakravorty is Professor of Economics at Tufts University and Fellow at the Toulouse School of Economics and CESifo.

Affiliations and Expertise

Tufts University, Medford, MA, USA

Majah-Leah Ravago

Majah-Leah V. Ravago is Assistant Professor and currently Director for Research at the UP School of Economics.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of the Philippines Dililman, Philippines

Reviews

“If we are to understand the impact of public policy on sustainable economic development and poverty reduction, we must likewise understand the structure of the economy and its institutions. The illustrious authors of this volume contribute to this mission by providing an integrated vision of an economy's natural resources, institutions of governance, and especially its agricultural and rural development." --His Excellency Benigno S. Aquino III, President of Republic of the Philippines