Droplet Wetting and Evaporation - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128007228, 9780128008089

Droplet Wetting and Evaporation

1st Edition

From Pure to Complex Fluids

Editors: David Brutin
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128007228
eBook ISBN: 9780128008089
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 20th May 2015
Page Count: 464
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Description

Droplet Wetting and Evaporation provides engineers, students, and researchers with the first comprehensive guide to the theory and applications of droplet wetting and evaporation.

Beginning with a relevant theoretical background, the book moves on to consider specific aspects, including heat transfer, flow instabilities, and the drying of complex fluid droplets.

Each chapter covers the principles of the subject, addressing corresponding practical issues and problems.

The text is ideal for a broad range of domains, from aerospace and materials, to biomedical applications, comprehensively relaying the challenges and approaches from the different communities leading the way in droplet research and development.

Key Features

  • Provides a broad, cross-subject coverage of theory and application that is ideal for engineers, students and researchers who need to follow all major developments in this interdisciplinary field
  • Includes comprehensive discussions of heat transfer, flow instabilities, and the drying of complex fluid droplets
  • Begins with an accessible summary of fundamental theory before moving on to specific areas such as heat transfer, flow instabilities, and the drying of complex fluid droplets

Readership

Engineers, researchers and graduate students of mechanical, chemical and biomedical engineering working on droplet problems and applications.

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Biographies
  • Preface
    • References
  • Introduction
    • References
  • Section I: Wetting and Spreading
    • Chapter 1. Liquid Spreading
      • 1.1 Theoretical concepts: equilibrium surface thermodynamics
      • 1.2 Spreading dynamics: pure fluids
      • 1.3 Spreading with complex fluids
      • References
    • Chapter 2. Contact Angles and the Surface Free Energy of Solids
      • 2.1 Equilibrium contact angle: Zisman plots
      • 2.2 Contact angle hysteresis
      • References
    • Chapter 3. Triple Line Motion and Evaporation
      • 3.1 Triple line dynamics
      • 3.2 Pinned TLs
      • 3.3 TL depinning during evaporation
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 4. Precursor Films and Contact Line Microstructures
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 The lubrication approximation
      • 4.3 Cox–Voinov solution and viscous bending
      • 4.4 Extended flat microfilms
      • 4.5 Microstructure of the moving contact line for a nonvolatile liquid
      • 4.6 Liquids with evaporation/condensation into/from their pure vapor
      • 4.7 Summary and concluding remarks
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 5. Superamphiphobic Surfaces
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Overhanging textures
      • 5.3 Slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces (SLIPS)
      • Glossary
      • Nomenclature
      • References
    • Chapter 6. Superspreading
      • 6.1 Definition of superspreading—trisiloxane surfactants
      • 6.2 Papers and reviews on superspreading—the good, the bad, or the ugly?
      • 6.3 Chemical structures of trisiloxane surfactants—correlation with spreading performance?
      • 6.4 Data, hypotheses, models, and theories—how to prove the unprovable?
      • 6.5 Mode of action of superspreading surfactants—too many possibilities?
      • 6.6 Different stages of the spreading process—when does the spreading start to become “super”?
      • 6.7 An equation containing substrate wettability and surface tension gradient
      • 6.8 Surfactants jumping ahead of the contact line?
      • 6.9 Unusual concentration dependence—a lot does not always help a lot!
      • 6.10 Kinetic models to describe the moving contact line
      • 6.11 Specific phase behavior—coincidence or crucial?
      • 6.12 New approaches—experimental techniques and simulation
      • 6.13 Conclusion
      • Glossary
      • Nomenclature
      • References
    • Chapter 7. Leidenfrost Drops
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Shape of Leidenfrost drops
      • 7.3 Physics of the vapor film
      • 7.4 Global evaporation rate and lifetime
      • 7.5 Conclusions and perspectives
      • References
  • Section II: Heat and Mass Transfer
    • Chapter 8. Pure Diffusion
      • 8.1 Theory
      • 8.2 Application
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 9. Convection
      • 9.1 Basis
      • 9.2 Spalding model
      • 9.3 Stefan flow
      • 9.4 Influence of thermo-gravitational convection
      • 9.5 Empirical model
      • 9.6 Community presents concerns
      • 9.7 Applications
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 10. Liquid and Vapor Properties
      • References
    • Chapter 11. Solid Substrate Properties
      • 11.1 Thermal properties
      • 11.2 Surface properties
      • Nomenclature
      • Greek Symbols
      • Subscripts
      • Abbreviations
      • References
    • Chapter 12. Soft Substrates
      • 12.1 Deformation of soft substrate due to interfacial forces
      • 12.2 Influence of soft substrates on the evaporation of pure water
      • 12.3 Using soft substrates to control the deposition pattern formed during suspension droplet evaporation
      • Glossary
      • Nomenclature
      • Greek Symbols
      • References
    • Chapter 13. Soluble Substrate
      • 13.1 Interplay between evaporation and dissolution
      • 13.2 Evaporation in presence of solute concentration with or without dissolution
      • 13.3 Water drop evaporation on a flat crystal salt substrate
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 14. Droplets on Liquid Interfaces
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Self-motion of camphor grains
      • 14.3 Self-motion, self-rotation, and self-pulsation
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 15. Radiative Heat Transfer in Droplets
      • 15.1 Theoretical aspects
      • 15.2 Application
      • Glossary
      • References
  • Section III: Flow Instabilities
    • Chapter 16. Flow Stability
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Relevance of frozen-time approaches
      • 16.3 Asymptotic Numerical Method of frozen-time model for sessile droplet evaporation
      • 16.4 Parametric study with the one-sided steady-state model
      • 16.5 The two-sided model to investigate highly nonlinear regimes
      • 16.6 Concluding remarks
      • Glossary
      • Nomenclature
      • References
    • Chapter 17. Thermal Origins
      • 17.1 Thermo-gravitational instabilities: contact line in free fall
      • 17.2 Thermo-capillary instabilities: evaporation of H2O or D2O
      • 17.3 Thermo-solutal instabilities
      • References
    • Chapter 18. Hydrothermal Waves
      • 18.1 Theoretical concepts
      • 18.2 Experimental observations
      • 18.3 Mathematical model and simulation
      • Glossary
      • References
  • Section IV: Complex Fluids Drying
    • Chapter 19. Droplets of Colloids
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Colloidal system stability
      • 19.3 Mono-dispersed colloidal systems
      • 19.4 Bidispersed colloidal systems
      • 19.5 Parameters influencing the patterns
      • 19.6 Nanoparticles surface charges
      • References
    • Chapter 20. Droplets of Ionic Solutions
      • 20.1 Rainbows on Earth and other planets
      • 20.2 Atmospheric aerosols
      • 20.3 Spray drying and levitated droplets
      • 20.4 Droplets in electric fields
      • 20.5 Dryout patterns, crystal nucleation, and morphology from sessile droplets
      • 20.6 Creeping salt droplets
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 21. Droplets with Surfactants
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Spreading and evaporation of fluid droplets
      • 21.3 Sessile droplets of surfactant solutions
      • 21.4 Conclusions
      • Nomenclature
      • References
    • Chapter 22. Droplets of Polymers
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 Drying process of complex fluids
      • 22.3 Skin formation
      • 22.4 Surface instabilities
      • Glossary
      • Nomenclature
      • References
    • Chapter 23. Droplets of Biological Fluids
      • 23.1 Blood serum
      • 23.2 Whole blood drying
      • 23.3 Whole blood drop spreading
      • 23.4 Other fluids
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 24. Complex Fluids Droplets in Leidenfrost State
      • 24.1 Introduction
      • 24.2 Experimental setup
      • 24.3 Water+surfactant
      • 24.4 Water+microparticle
      • 24.5 Summary and perspectives
      • Glossary
      • References
  • Section V: External Forces Influence
    • Chapter 25. Gravity
      • 25.1 Access to reduced gravity conditions
      • 25.2 Droplets under reduced gravity conditions
      • 25.3 Increased gravity conditions
      • References
    • Chapter 26. Oscillating/Vibrating Surfaces
      • 26.1 Low frequencies
      • 26.2 High frequencies
      • Glossary
      • References
    • Chapter 27. Electric Forces
      • 27.1 Theoretical basis
      • 27.2 Changes induced by an electrical field
      • 27.3 Wetting contact angle
      • 27.4 Drop shape
      • Glossary
      • References
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
464
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128008089
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128007228

About the Editor

David Brutin

David Brutin is Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering of Aix-Marseille University. He is currently working on phase change heat transfer with pure and complex fluids, for example blood and nanofluids. His research interests include space; aeronautics; medical diagnosis; forensic science; and printing industry.

Affiliations and Expertise

Mechanical Engineering department, Aix-Marseille University, France