Distributed Learning - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081005989, 9780081006092

Distributed Learning

1st Edition

Pedagogy and Technology in Online Information Literacy Instruction

Editors: Tasha Maddison Maha Kumaran
eBook ISBN: 9780081006092
Paperback ISBN: 9780081005989
Imprint: Chandos Publishing
Published Date: 10th October 2016
Page Count: 472
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Description

The field of distributed learning is constantly evolving. Online technology provides instructors with the flexibility to offer meaningful instruction to students who are at a distance or in some cases right on campus, but still unable to be physically present in the classroom. This dynamic environment challenges librarians to monitor, learn, adapt, collaborate, and use new technological advances in order to make the best use of techniques to engage students and improve learning outcomes and success rates. Distributed Learning provides evidence based information on a variety of issues, surrounding online teaching and learning from the perspective of librarians.

Key Features

  • Includes extensive literature search on distributed learning
  • Provides pedagogy, developing content, and technology by librarians
  • Shows the importance of collaboration and buy-in from all parties involved

Readership

Librarians in Academic Libraries who are responsible for delivering instruction in a distributed learning environment, and librarians in Public Libraries, School Libraries and possible Special Libraries who are responsible for delivering instruction and would like to explore alternative methods of delivery

Table of Contents

  • List of Contributors
  • Biography
  • Foreword
  • Chapter 1. Introduction
    • References
  • Section I: Foundations of Distributed Learning
    • Chapter 2. Literature Review of Online Learning in Academic Libraries
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Background
      • 2.3 Methodology
      • 2.4 Subject Distribution
      • 2.5 Technology
      • 2.6 Creation Technology
      • 2.7 Access Technology
      • 2.8 Learning Environments
      • 2.9 Challenges With Online Instruction
      • 2.10 Best Practices
      • 2.11 Assessment
      • 2.12 Methods of Delivery
      • 2.13 Collaboration With Faculty and Other Stakeholders
      • 2.14 Learning Outcomes
      • 2.15 Limitations
      • 2.16 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 3. Using Theory and Practice to Build an Instructional Technology Tool Kit
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Theory: A Review of the Literature
      • 3.3 The Scholarship of Active Learning
      • 3.4 The Scholarship of Effective Instructional Technology Use
      • 3.5 Desired Learning Outcomes: An Important Consideration
      • 3.6 Practice: Meaningfully Integrating Technology Tools in Information Literacy Instruction
      • 3.7 Remembering Information
      • 3.8 Understanding Information
      • 3.9 Applying Information
      • 3.10 Analyzing Information
      • 3.11 Evaluating Information
      • 3.12 Creating Information
      • 3.13 Next Steps and Conclusions
      • Appendix Technology Resources, Organized as Referenced in the Chapter
      • References
  • Section II: Pedagogy
    • Chapter 4. Designing Online Asynchronous Information Literacy Instruction Using the ADDIE Model
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Background
      • 4.2 Instructional Design Models
      • 4.3 Dick and Carey
      • 4.4 Recursive Reflective Design and Development Model
      • 4.5 Four-Component Instructional Design
      • 4.6 Kemp
      • 4.7 Gagné
      • 4.8 ADDIE
      • 4.9 Implementation Using the ADDIE Model
      • 4.10 Design
      • 4.11 Development
      • 4.12 Implementation
      • 4.13 Evaluation
      • 4.14 Conclusion
      • References
      • Appendix 1 FYC Rubric
      • Appendix 2 FYC Pretest Survey Summary
    • Chapter 5. Enhancing Kuhlthau’s Guided Inquiry Model Using Moodle and LibGuides to Strengthen Graduate Students’ Research Skills
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Redesign Rationale
      • 5.3 Curriculum Development for Distributed Learning Environment
      • 5.4 Kuhlthau’s Guided Inquiry Program for Information Literacy
      • 5.5 Online Zones of Intervention
      • 5.6 Technology
      • 5.7 LibGuides
      • 5.8 Information Literacy Sessions Overview
      • 5.9 Session One: Topic Selection
      • 5.10 Session Two: Website Evaluation and Scholarly Sources
      • 5.11 Session Three: Database Searching
      • 5.12 Assessment Measures
      • 5.13 Moodle and LibGuide Analytics
      • 5.14 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 6. A Model for Teaching Information Literacy in a Required Credit-Bearing Online Course
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Measure of INL102’s Success
      • 6.3 Integrating Technology
      • 6.4 Library Staff and Collection as a Resource
      • 6.5 Assessments
      • 6.6 Schedule for Updates
      • 6.7 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 7. Engaging Learners Online: Using Instructional Design Practices to Create Interactive Tutorials
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Design
      • 7.3 Assessment and Evaluation
      • 7.4 Selecting Technology
      • 7.5 Conclusion
      • References
      • Appendix 1 Clark’s Content Performance Matrix for Microbiology Tutorial
    • Chapter 8. Developing Best Practices for Creating an Authentic Learning Experience in an Online Learning Environment: Lessons Learned
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Sage, Guide, Meddler
      • 8.3 Befriend the Gatekeepers
      • 8.4 Possible Approaches
      • 8.5 Teaching in the Trenches
      • 8.6 One Goal, Many Tools
      • 8.7 Maintain Authority
      • 8.8 Assessment
      • 8.9 Future Work: Online Information Literacy Lab
      • 8.10 Conclusion
      • References
  • Section III: Technology
    • Chapter 9. Delivering Synchronous Online Library Instruction at a Large-Scale Academic Institution: Practical Tips and Lessons Learned
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Background
      • 9.3 Literature Review
      • 9.4 The Pilot
      • 9.5 Evaluating the Pilot
      • 9.6 Outcomes
      • 9.7 Checklist for Delivering Synchronous ILI
      • 9.8 Discussion
      • 9.9 Were There Technological Barriers to Student Attendance?
      • 9.10 Was the Timing Appropriate?
      • 9.11 Is Synchronous Online Delivery Right for the Target Audience?
      • 9.12 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 10. Making Library Research Real in the Digital Classroom: A Professor–Librarian Partnership
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Filling the Information Literacy Gap in Online Courses
      • 10.3 English 201 Courses at the Borough of Manhattan Community College
      • 10.4 Partnering to Design Online Research Instruction
      • 10.5 Implementing a Scaffolded Model of Research Instruction
      • 10.6 Start Small and Build Over Time
      • 10.7 A Diverse Range of Activities
      • 10.8 Revision
      • 10.9 Accessibility
      • 10.10 Assessment
      • 10.11 Library Day Test
      • 10.12 Workload and Sustainability
      • 10.13 Reflections on the Method and the Partnership
      • References
      • Appendix A Librarian’s Activities in the Course Modules
      • Appendix B Survey Questions
    • Chapter 11. Forging Connections in Digital Spaces: Teaching Information Literacy Skills Through Engaging Online Activities
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction and Literature Review
      • 11.2 Assignments and Learning Activities
      • 11.3 Discussion
      • 11.4 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 12. Innovation Through Collaboration: Using an Open-Source Learning Management System to Enhance Library Instruction and Student Learning
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Customized User Roles in Moodle
      • 12.3 Looking Ahead
      • References
      • Appendix 1 Senior Projects Information Literacy Skills Assessment Rubric-Purchase College Library
    • Chapter 13. From Technical Troubleshooting to Critical Inquiry: Fostering Inquiry-Based Learning Across Disciplines Through a Tutorial for Online Instructors
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Institutional Context
      • 13.3 Technology
      • 13.4 Collaboration
      • 13.5 The Pilot Series
      • 13.6 Conclusion
      • References
      • Appendix A Online Course Development: Library Resources Checklist
      • Appendix B Teaching Online Series: Library Module Table of Contents
      • Appendix C Communicating Assessment Criteria to Students: Rubrics
    • Chapter 14. Embedding the Library in the LMS: Is It a Good Investment for Your Organization’s Information Literacy Program?
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Literature Review
      • 14.3 History and Development of the Library Tools Tab at UAL
      • 14.4 Analysis: How Is the Value of the Embedded System Measured?
      • 14.5 How Does UAL Course Guide Use Compare with LTT Use?
      • 14.6 Conclusion
      • 14.7 Future Development
      • References
    • Chapter 15. A Decade of Distributed Library Learning: The NOSM Health Sciences Library Experience
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 The NOSM Context
      • 15.2 The Health Sciences Library
      • 15.3 Videoconferencing
      • 15.4 Videoconferencing and Participant Engagement
      • 15.5 Technological Challenges of Videoconferencing
      • 15.6 LibGuides, Padlet, and Powtoon
      • 15.7 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 16. Parallel Lines: A Look at Some Common Issues in the Development, Repurposing, and Use of Online Information Literacy Training Resources at Glasgow Caledonian University
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Market Scan
      • 16.3 Planning: Storyboarding, Design, and Project Management
      • 16.4 Pedagogical Issues, IL Frameworks
      • 16.5 Development Software (HTML, Flash, and Gamification)
      • 16.6 Compatibility with Mobile Devices
      • 16.7 Hardware and Methods of Delivery
      • 16.8 Testing and Pilot Phases
      • 16.9 Teaching: The Best Way to Use Online Resources
      • 16.10 Futureproofing
      • 16.11 Areas for Further Research
      • References
      • Appendix
  • Section IV: Case Studies
    • Chapter 17. Concept to Reality: Integrating Online Library Instruction Into a University English Curriculum
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction and Background
      • 17.2 Partnering to Enable Library Literacy for First-Year English Literature Students
      • 17.3 The Initial Development of Program Content, Technology, and Evaluative Formula
      • 17.4 The Pilot of the Program and the Evolution of Content, Style, and Delivery
      • 17.5 The Route to Success: Collaboration, Evaluation, and the Importance of Partnership
      • 17.6 Considering the Future While Remaining Connected to the Wider Educational Community
      • References
    • Chapter 18. A Successful Reboot: Reimagining an Online Information Literacy Tutorial for a First-Year Experience Program
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Setting the Scene: Literature Review
      • 18.3 The Pitch: Establishing the Goals of the Project
      • 18.4 Casting Call: The Pilot Participants
      • 18.5 Action!: The Video Production
      • 18.6 On Set: The Flipped (Library) Classroom
      • 18.7 Test Screening: Focus Groups
      • 18.8 Project Distribution: Making the Most of the LMS
      • 18.9 The Reviews Are In: Assessing the Student Quiz Results and Instructor Feedback
      • 18.10 Director Commentary: Discussion
      • 18.11 That’s a Wrap! Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 19. Rethinking Plagiarism in Information Literacy Instruction: A Case Study on Cross-Campus Collaboration in the Creation of an Online Academic Honesty Video Tutorial
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Background: Discovering the Need for a Plagiarism Tutorial
      • 19.3 Literature Review: Who’s Creating Library Videos?
      • 19.4 Method: Producing a Useful and Informative Video
      • 19.5 Lessons Learned: Looking Back and Moving Forward
      • 19.6 Assessment: Measuring Improvements
      • 19.7 Conclusion: All Good Things…
      • References
    • Chapter 20. Adapting to the Evolving Information Landscape: A Case Study
      • Abstract
      • 20.1 The Evolution of an Information Literacy Course: A Case Study
      • 20.2 Information Literacy Course History
      • 20.3 A Question of Format
      • 20.4 Perception Becomes Reality
      • 20.5 A Question of Content
      • 20.6 The Evolving Landscape
      • 20.7 New Ways of Thinking
      • 20.8 Information Literacy and Visual Thinking Strategies
      • 20.9 Assessment
      • 20.10 Assessment Analysis
      • 20.11 The Evolution Continues
      • 20.12 Conclusion
      • Appendix A
      • Appendix B
      • Scoring Guide
      • References
  • Section V: Innovations
    • Chapter 21. Gaming Library Instruction: Using Interactive Play to Promote Research as a Process
      • Abstract
      • 21.1 Introduction
      • 21.2 Gamification and Interactivity
      • 21.3 Creation of the Tutorial at GHL
      • 21.4 Text-Based
      • 21.5 Video Based
      • 21.6 Feedback and Continued Game Development
      • 21.7 Conclusion
      • References
    • Chapter 22. Implementing Flipped Classroom Model Utilizing Online Learning Guides in an Academic Hospital Library Setting
      • Abstract
      • 22.1 Introduction
      • 22.2 History of the Flipped Classroom
      • 22.3 Background
      • 22.4 Methodology
      • 22.5 Evaluation
      • 22.6 Conclusion
      • References
      • Appendix A Instructor Reflections
      • Appendix B Learner Evaluation Form
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
472
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Chandos Publishing 2017
Published:
Imprint:
Chandos Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081006092
Paperback ISBN:
9780081005989

About the Editor

Tasha Maddison

Tasha Maddison is a Librarian with Saskatchewan Polytechnic. Previously she worked as a Librarian at the University of Saskatchewan. She has been active on many committees involving online library instruction, including a team that looked at integrating library learning objects into Desire2Learn, and a task force studying the first year experience and how best to meet students needs. She spent several years researching and implementing flipped classrooms into undergraduate engineering courses, and has also explored teaching effectiveness of online tutorials when compared to in-person instruction. She completed a B.A. in English and Drama at the University of Saskatchewan, and the M.L.I.S. program at Wayne State University in Detroit, MI in 2012, where she specialized in academic libraries, reference and instruction.

Affiliations and Expertise

Librarian,Saskatchewan Polytechnic, Canada

Maha Kumaran

Maha Kumaran is currently the Liaison Librarian for the Colleges of Nursing and Nutrition at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. As the liaison librarian she collaborates with faculty to teach undergraduate and graduate students. Students from the College of Nursing are located all over the province, the country and beyond. Depending on the locality of the students, she either teaches in-person or via Web-Ex, Skype, Blackboard Collaborate or by using the Remote Desktop Connection. She has recorded videos using Camtasia and has made it available for students through her nursing research guide. She would like to continue to explore how best to teach nursing students in a distributed learning environment. Her academic interests are in the area of multiculturalism, minorities and currently distributed learning environment.

Affiliations and Expertise

Liaison Librarian for the Colleges of Nursing and Nutrition at the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada