Description

Active ingredients in foods must remain fully functional for as long as necessary and be transported and discharged appropriately to have the desired nutritional effect. Delivery and controlled release systems are an essential way to achieve these aims. This important book reviews how to optimise these systems to maximise the health-promoting properties of food products.

Opening chapters review factors affecting nutrient bioavailability and methods to test delivery system efficacy. Part two addresses materials used and specific techniques for delivery and release. The benefits and drawbacks of structured lipids, micro- and nano-emulsions, food-protein-derived materials, complexes and conjugates of biopolymers, and starch as an encapsulation material for delivery of functional food ingredients, are all considered. Part three discusses the delivery and controlled release of particular nutraceuticals such as antioxidants and vitamins, folic acid, probiotics, fish oils and proteins. Part four covers regulatory issues and future trends in bioactives and nutraceuticals.

Edited by a leading expert in the field, Delivery and controlled release of bioactives in foods and nutraceuticals is a valuable reference for those working in the food industry and particularly those developing nutraceuticals.

Key Features

  • Reviews techniques to optimise the delivery and release of bioactives in food
  • Discusses the factors that affect nutrient bioavailability and methods to test delivery system efficacy
  • Addresses materials used and specific techniques for delivery and release

Readership

Those working in the food industry, particularly those developing nutraceuticals

Table of Contents

Part 1 The effectiveness of controlled release and delivery systems: Assessing the bioavailability of nutraceuticals; Structure of the gastrointestinal mucus layer and implications for controlled release and delivery of functional food ingredients; Testing the effectiveness of nutrient delivery systems; Lyotropic liquid crystals as delivery vehicles for food ingredients. Part 2 Materials and techniques for controlled release and delivery of nutrients: Structured lipids as delivery systems; Micro- and nano-emulsions for delivery of functional food ingredients; Emulsion droplet interfacial engineering to deliver bioactive lipids into functional foods; Lipid self-assembled particles for the delivery of nutraceuticals; Complexes and conjugates of biopolymers for delivery of bioactive ingredients via food; Food-protein-derived materials and their use as carriers and delivery systems for active food components; Starch as an encapsulation material to control digestion rate in the delivery of active food components. Part 3 Delivery and controlled release of particular nutraceuticals: Encapsulation and controlled release of antioxidants and vitamins; Encapsulation and controlled release of folic acid; Encapsulation of probiotics; Encapsulation of fish oils; Encapsulation approaches for proteins. Part 4 Regulatory issues and future trends: Regulatory aspects of nutrient delivery systems; The future of controlled release and delivery technologies.

Details

No. of pages:
496
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2008
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781845694210
Print ISBN:
9781845691455

About the editor

Nissim Garti

(FROM EDIBLE OLEOGELS) Nissim Garti obtained his B.Sc., M.Sc., and Ph.D. from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He has been a full professor since 1990 and holds the Ratner Chair of Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry. He also serves as a Board Member Elect and Director of the Hebrew University Governors Executive Board since January 2011. Nissim is the recipient of numerous prestigious awards including the Rockefeller Award, the Israel President Award for one of the most innovative inventions in 60 years of the existence of the country, Life-Time Achievement Award of the Food Society, the Chang Award of the AOCS, the Corporate Research Achievement Award of the AOCS for 2011, and many others. His achievements include publishing over 380 original (research) refereed papers in peer reviewed journals; writing over 60 review chapters in scientific books; granted over 80 patents; edited 7 books and additional 4 in preparation; invited to over 180 conferences as keynote, session, and invited speaker; and educated and tutored 38 Ph.D. students and 84 M.Sc. students. Nissim is a member of the board of directors of several academic institutions in Israel and consults for several Israeli and global industries. Nissim’s expertise, competence, and active research is in colloid chemistry, emulsion technology, dispersed systems, delivery new vehicles, microemulsions and lyotropic liquid crystals, crystallization phenomena, interfacial reactions and reactivity, amphiphilic proteins, hydrocolloids, dendrimers, nutraceuticals, and food science. OR (FROM COCOA BUTTER) Nissim Garti is Professor of Chemistry at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. One of the founders of Adumim Chemicals Ltd., NutraLease Ltd.—a company focused on a nano-encapsulation technology for nutraceuticals, and LDS (Lyotropic Delivery Systems). He received B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, in 1969, 1971 and 1974 respectively. Gart

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Ratner Chair of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Applied Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel

Reviews

Active ingredients in foods must remain fully functional for as long as necessary and be transported and discharged appropriately to have the desired nutritional effect. Delivery and controlled release systems are an essential way to achieve these aims. This important book reviews how to optimise these systems to maximise the health-promoting properties of food products.

Opening chapters review factors affecting nutrient bioavailability and methods to test delivery system efficacy. Part two addresses materials used and specific techniques for delivery and release. The benefits and drawbacks of structured lipids, micro- and nano-emulsions, food-protein-derived materials, complexes and conjugates of biopolymers, and starch as an encapsulation material for delivery of functional food ingredients, are all considered. Part three discusses the delivery and controlled release of particular nutraceuticals such as antioxidants and vitamins, folic acid, probiotics, fish oils and proteins. Part four covers regulatory issues and future trends in bioactives and nutraceuticals.

Edited by a leading expert in the field, Delivery and controlled release of bioactives in foods and nutraceuticals is a valuable reference for those working in the food industry and particularly those developing nutraceuticals.