Current Laboratory Techniques in Rabies Diagnosis, Research and Prevention, Volume 1

Current Laboratory Techniques in Rabies Diagnosis, Research and Prevention, Volume 1

1st Edition - July 30, 2014
This is the Latest Edition
  • Editors: Charles Rupprecht, Thirumeni Nagarajan
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128000144
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128004654

Purchase options

Purchase options
Available
DRM-free (Mobi, EPub, PDF)
Sales tax will be calculated at check-out

Institutional Subscription

Free Global Shipping
No minimum order

Description

Laboratory Techniques in Rabies Diagnosis, Research and Prevention provides a basic understanding of the current trends in rabies. It establishes a new facility for rabies surveillance, vaccine and antibody manufacturing. It offers clarity about the choice of laboratory methods for diagnosis and virus typing, of systems for producing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies and of methods for testing potency of vaccines and antibodies. The book covers advancements in the classical methods described as well as recent methods and approaches pertaining to rabies diagnosis and research.

Key Features

  • Supplies techniques pertaining to rabies diagnosis and research
  • Provides an update on the conventional and modern vaccines for rabies prevention
  • Offers updates on the full length antibodies and antibody fragments for post exposure prophylaxis of rabies
  • Presents technique descriptions that can be used to be compared to industry protocols to identify and establish potential new techniques

Readership

Students, researchers, health professionals, biologists in microbiology, industry personnel and laboratory personal in the vaccine, biopharmaceutical and diagnostic industries

Table of Contents

    • Foreword
    • List of Contributors
    • Part One: Introduction
      • Chapter One. Basic Facts about Lyssaviruses
        • 1.1 Introduction
        • 1.2 Virion and Genome Organization
        • 1.3 Phylogeny and Serologic Cross-Reactivity of Lyssaviruses
        • 1.4 Host Range
        • 1.5 Pathobiology
        • References
    • Part Two: Rabies Diagnosis
      • Section A: Demonstration of Viral Subunits and Antigens
        • Chapter Two. Demonstration of Lyssavirus Antigens by a Direct Rapid Immunohistochemical Test
          • 2.1 Introduction
          • 2.2 Materials
          • 2.3 Methods
          • 2.4 Discussion
          • References
        • Chapter Three. Demonstration of Rabies Virus Antigens by a Latex Agglutination Test
          • 3.1 Introduction
          • 3.2 Materials
          • 3.3 Methods
          • 3.4 Discussion
          • References
        • Chapter Four. Rabies Diagnosis: Demonstration of Viral Antigens by Flow Cytometry
          • 4.1 Introduction
          • 4.2 Materials
          • 4.3 Methods
          • 4.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Five. Demonstration of Rabies Virus Antigens by an Immunochromatographic Strip Test
          • 5.1 Introduction
          • 5.2 Materials
          • 5.3 Methods
          • 5.4 Discussion
          • References
      • Section B: Demonstration of Viral Nucleic Acids
        • Chapter Six. Demonstration of African Lyssavirus RNA with Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
          • 6.1 Introduction
          • 6.2 Materials
          • 6.3 Methods
          • 6.4 Discussion
          • References
        • Chapter Seven. Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Demonstration of Lyssavirus Nucleic Acid
          • 7.1 Real-Time Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction for the Demonstration of Lyssavirus Nucleic Acid
          • 7.2 Methodology
          • 7.3 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Eight. Reverse Transcription-Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification System for the Detection of Rabies Virus
          • 8.1 Introduction
          • 8.2 Materials
          • 8.3 Methods
          • 8.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Nine. Detection of Viral Nucleic Acids by In Situ Hybridization
          • 9.1 Introduction
          • 9.2 Materials
          • 9.3 Methods
          • 9.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Ten. Genetic Characterization via Pyrosequencing
          • 10.1 Introduction
          • 10.2 Materials
          • 10.3 Methods
          • 10.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
      • Section C: Demonstration of Viral Antibodies and Immune Complexes
        • Chapter Eleven. Demonstration of Immune Complexes by Capture Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
          • 11.1 Introduction
          • 11.2 Materials
          • 11.3 Methods
          • 11.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Twelve. Demonstration of Viral Antibodies by an Immunochromatographic Strip Test
          • 12.1 Introduction
          • 12.2 Materials
          • 12.3 Methods
          • 12.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Thirteen. Rabies Diagnosis: Demonstration of Viral Antibodies by Flow Cytometry
          • 13.1 Introduction
          • 13.2 Materials
          • 13.3 Methods
          • 13.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Fourteen. Demonstration of Rabies Antibody by a Latex Agglutination Test
          • 14.1 Introduction
          • 14.2 Materials
          • 14.3 Methods
          • 14.4 Discussion
          • References
        • Chapter Fifteen. Demonstration of Viral Antibodies by Pseudotype Virus Neutralization
          • 15.1 Introduction
          • 15.2 Materials
          • 15.3 Methods
          • 15.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
      • Section D: Typing/Differentiation of Lyssaviruses
        • Chapter Sixteen. Sanger Sequencing of Lyssaviruses
          • 16.1 Background
          • 16.2 Methodology
          • 16.3 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Seventeen. Next Generation Sequencing of Lyssaviruses
          • 17.1 Background
          • 17.2 Methodology
          • 17.3 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Eighteen. Genetic Characterization of Rabies Viruses by In Situ Hybridization
          • 18.1 Introduction
          • 18.2 Materials
          • 18.3 Methods
          • 18.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Nineteen. Oligonucleotide Microarray: Applications for Lyssavirus Speciation
          • 19.1 Introduction
          • 19.2 Methodology
          • 19.3 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Twenty. Demonstration of Lyssavirus Nucleic Acids by Pyrosequencing
          • 20.1 Introduction
          • 20.2 Materials
          • 20.3 Methods
          • 20.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
      • Section E: Demonstration of Viral-Induced Changes in Tissues/Organs
        • Chapter Twenty One. Rabies Diagnosis: MR Imaging
          • 21.1 Introduction
          • 21.2 Materials
          • 21.3 Methods
          • 21.4 Discussion
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
    • Part Three: Rabies Biologics
      • Section F: Rabies Vaccines for Humans or Other Animals
        • Chapter Twenty Two. Attenuated Vaccines for Veterinary Use
          • 22.1 Introduction
          • 22.2 Materials
          • 22.3 Methods
          • 22.4 Discussion
          • References
        • Chapter Twenty Three. Pox Viral Vectored Vaccines for Rabies
          • 23.1 Introduction
          • 23.2 Materials
          • 23.3 Methods
          • 23.4 Discussion
          • References
        • Chapter Twenty Four. Recombinant Rabies Virus Vaccines
          • 24.1 Introduction
          • 24.2 Materials, Methods, and Results
          • 24.3 Discussion
          • References
        • Chapter Twenty Five. Adenoviral Vectors as Vaccine Carriers for Prevention of Rabies
          • 25.1 Introduction
          • 25.2 Basic Characteristics of Ad Viruses
          • 25.3 Types of Ad Vectors
          • 25.4 Transgene Product for Rabies Vaccines
          • 25.5 Construction of Ad Vectors
          • 25.6 Ad Virus Rescue and Expansion
          • 25.7 Quality Control of Ad Vectors
          • 25.8 Discussion
          • References
      • Section G: Rabies Antibodies/Fragments
        • Chapter Twenty Six. Production of Human Monoclonal Antibodies using Mammalian Expression Systems
          • 26.1 Introduction
          • 26.2 Materials
          • 26.3 Methods
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
        • Chapter Twenty Seven. Generation of Immune Globulin Single Variable Domains by Display Technologies
          • 27.1 Introduction
          • 27.2 Materials
          • 27.3 Methods
          • 27.4 Discussion
          • 27.5 Experimental Tips
          • Acknowledgments
          • References
    • Part Four: Appendix
      • Appendix A
      • Appendix B
      • Appendix C. Filter Paper Technology for Sampling, Storage, and Shipment of Rabies Suspect Samples for the Identification of Viral Nucleic Acids
        • C.1 Introduction
        • C.2 Materials
        • C.3 Methods
        • C.4 Discussion
        • Acknowledgments
        • References
    • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 350
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2014
  • Published: July 30, 2014
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128000144
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128004654
  • About the Editors

    Charles Rupprecht

    Charles Rupprecht
    Professor Charles E. Rupprecht is the Director of Research at the Global Alliance for Rabies Control and is the previous Director of WHO Collaborating Center for Rabies Research. He has won numerous federal service awards including the National Center for Infectious Diseases Public Health Protection Research Award in 2005.

    Affiliations and Expertise

    Global Alliance for Rabies Control

    Thirumeni Nagarajan

    Thirumeni Nagarajan
    Professor Nagarajan Thirumeni is a professor in biotechnology and the manager of Indian Immunologics Ltd. as well as the general manager of research and development in the biologics division of E. Ltd, Hyderabad, India.

    Affiliations and Expertise

    Biological E. Limited, Hyderabad, India