Computer Programming and Computer Systems

Computer Programming and Computer Systems

1st Edition - January 1, 1967

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  • Author: Anthony Hassitt
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483258416

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Description

Computer Programming and Computer Systems imparts a “reading knowledge” of computer systems. This book describes the aspects of machine-language programming, monitor systems, computer hardware, and advanced programming that every thorough programmer should be acquainted with. This text discusses the automatic electronic digital computers, symbolic language, Reverse Polish Notation, and Fortran into assembly language. The routine for reading blocked tapes, dimension statements in subroutines, general-purpose input routine, and efficient use of memory are also elaborated. This publication is intended as an introduction to modern programming practices for professional programmers, but is also valuable to research workers in science, engineering, academic, and industrial fields who are using computers.

Table of Contents


  • Preface

    ■1 Computer Systems

    1.1 Introduction

    1.2 Automatic Electronic Digital Computers

    1.3 The Second Generation of Computers

    1.4 Compilers and Assemblers

    1.5 I/O Channels

    1.6 The Interrupt System

    1.7 The Monitor System

    1.8 The Fortran Monitor System

    1.9 Algol

    1.10 Fortran IV and Fortran 63

    1.11 IBSYS

    1.12 Job Scheduling and Time Sharing

    1.13 The CDC 6600

    1.14 The IBM 360

    1.15 PL/1

    1.16 Conclusions

    Problems

    ■2 Machine Language and Assembly Language

    2.1 Introduction

    2.2 The Memory

    2.3 Binary Notation

    2.4 The Representation of Instructions

    2.5 Symbolic Language

    2.6 Arithmetic Instructions

    2.7 Transfer Instructions

    2.8 Some Simple Assembly-Language Programs

    2.9 Logical and Shift Operations

    2.10 Characters and Bytes

    2.11 Other Types of Instructions

    2.12 Floating-Point Instructions

    2.13 Index Instructions

    2.14 Literals

    2.15 Summary

    Problems

    ■3 Central Processing Units

    3.1 Introduction

    3.2 The CDC 1604 and CDC 3600

    3.3 Complement Notation

    3.4 The IBM 1620

    3.5 The IBM 1401

    3.6 Reverse Polish Notation

    3.7 The KDF9 Computer

    3.8 The CDC 6600

    3.9 The IBM 360

    3.10 Summary of Instructions for the IBM 360

    3.11 The IBM 360 Assembler

    3.12 Conclusions

    Problems

    ■4 Compiler Language

    4.1 Character Sets and Identifiers

    4.2 Declarative Statements

    4.3 Fortran into Assembly Language

    4.4 Types of Variables

    4.5 Subscripted Variables

    4.6 IF and GO TO Statements

    4.7 The DO Statement

    4.8 Macro Instructions

    4.9 Subroutines

    4.10 An Example of a Program Compiled by Fortran 63

    4.11 An Example of a Program Compiled by Fortran IV

    Problems

    ■5 The Computer System

    5.1 Introduction

    5.2 Magnetic Tape

    5.3 Data Channels

    5.4 The Interrupt System

    5.5 Other I/O Devices

    5.6 Alphanumeric Information

    5.7 Binary Versus BCD

    5.8 Logical and Physical Records

    5.9 Basic Input and Output

    5.10 Standard Binary Input and Output

    5.11 Blocked Tapes

    5.12 A Routine for Reading Blocked Tapes

    5.13 IOEX and IOCS

    5.14 Logical and Physical Units

    5.15 A Tape Dump Program

    5.16 The Software System

    5.17 Time Sharing and Multiprogramming

    5.18 The CDC 6600

    5.19 Summary

    Problems

    ■6 Fortran Subroutines

    6.1 Introduction

    6.2 Subroutines and Relocation

    6.3 Compiling Subroutine Arguments

    6.4 Function Subroutines

    6.5 Dimension Statements in Subroutines

    6.6 Variable Dimensions

    6.7 The Subroutine Prologue

    6.8 Common

    6.9 Labeled Common

    6.10 External Symbols

    6.11 Relocation and the Loader

    6.12 The Fortran IV Loader

    6.13 Data Statements

    6.14 Indirect Addressing

    6.15 Subroutines and Control Sections in the IBM 360

    Problems

    ■7 Character Manipulation

    7.1 Introduction

    7.2 Translating BCD into Binary

    7.3 Logical Operations in Fortran

    7.4 Character Manipulation with Rl Format

    7.5 A Simple Format-Free Input Routine

    7.6 A General-Purpose Input Routine

    7.7 Encode and Decode

    7.8 Format-Free Output

    7.9 List-Directed Output

    7.10 An Assembly Program

    Problems

    ■8 Efficiency

    8.1 Introduction

    8.2 Efficient Planning

    8.3 On Writing Subroutines

    8.4 Debugging

    8.5 Efficiency of Fortran Coding

    8.6 The Efficient Use of Memory

    8.7 Chain and Overlay

    8.8 Timing

    Problems

    ■9 The Dynamic Use of Memory

    9.1 Introduction

    9.2 Arrays and the Storage Mapping Function

    9.3 The Memory Stack

    9.4 Virtual Memory

    9.5 Recursion

    9.6 List Processing

    Problems

    ■10 Programming Language PL/1

    10.1 Introduction

    10.2 Characters, Identifiers, Operators, Labels

    10.3 Data Types and Descriptions

    10.4 Assignment Statements

    10.5 Arrays

    10.6 Blocks and Dynamic Use of Memory

    10.7 Internal and External Procedures

    10.8 IF and DO Statements

    10.9 Multiprocessing

    10.10 Input and Output

    10.11 Algol Compared to PL/1

    10.12 The Macro-Processor

    10.13 Summary

    Problems

    References

    Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 384
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 1967
  • Published: January 1, 1967
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9781483258416

About the Author

Anthony Hassitt

About the Editor

Anthony Ralston

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