Comparative Anatomy and Histology

1st Edition

A Mouse and Human Atlas (Expert Consult)

Editors: Piper Treuting Suzanne Dintzis
Hardcover ISBN: 9780123813619
eBook ISBN: 9780123813626
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 16th December 2011
Page Count: 474
90.95 + applicable tax
73.00 + applicable tax
119.95 + applicable tax
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Description

Comparative Anatomy and Histology: A Mouse and Human Atlas is aimed at the new mouse investigator as well as medical and veterinary pathologists who need to expand their knowledge base into comparative anatomy and histology. It guides the reader through normal mouse anatomy and histology using direct comparison to the human. The side by side comparison of mouse and human tissues highlight the unique biology of the mouse, which has great impact on the validation of mouse models of human disease.

Key Features

  • Offers the first comprehensive source for comparing human and mouse anatomy and histology through over 600 full-color images, in one reference work
  • Experts from both human and veterinary fields take readers through each organ system in a side-by-side comparative approach to anatomy and histology - human Netter anatomy images along with Netter-style mouse images
  • Enables human and veterinary pathologists to examine tissue samples with greater accuracy and confidence
  • Teaches biomedical researchers to examine the histologic changes in their mutant mice

Readership

Human and veterinary pathologists, pathology residents, laboratory animal medicine veterinarians, and principal investigators, postdoctoral and graduate students working with genetically manipulated mice.

Table of Contents

List of Contributors

Acknowledgments

1. Introduction

Overview

Comparative Pathology: Closing a Gap

C57BL/6 Mice as Index Strain

Atlas Scope and Design

Further Reading and Relevant Website

2. Phenotyping

What Is Phenotyping?

Why Phenotype?

Which Mice, How Many, and When?

Which Tests?

Role of Anatomy and Histology Evaluation (Pathology) in Phenotyping

What Terminology?

How to Start?

Conclusions

Further Reading and Relevant Websites

3. Necropsy and Histology

Introduction

Fixation Considerations Prior to Necropsy

Necropsy

Histology

Further Reading and Relevant Websites

4. Mammary Gland

Gross Anatomy and Development

Histology

Further Reading

5. Skeletal System

Introduction

Gross Anatomy

Histology

Further Reading

6. Nose, Sinus, Pharynx, and Larynx

Introduction

Nose and Sinus

Pharynx and Larynx

Further Reading

7. Oral Cavity and Teeth

Introduction

Gross Anatomy

Histology

Further Reading

8. Salivary Glands

Introduction

Gross Anatomy

Histology

Further Reading

9. Respiratory

Introduction

Gross Anatomy

Histology

Further Reading

10. Cardiovascular

Introduction

Heart

Coronary Vasculature

Myocardium

Conduction System

Cardiac Valves

Vasculature

Common Incidental Findings

Further Reading

11. Upper Gastrointestinal Tract

Introduction

Esophagus

Stomach

Small Intestine

Further Reading

12. Lower Gastrointestinal Tract

Introduction

Gross Anatomy

Histology

Further Reading

13. Liver and Gallbladder

Details

No. of pages:
474
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2012
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780123813626
eBook ISBN:
9780128016053
Hardcover ISBN:
9780123813619

About the Editor

Piper Treuting

Assistant Professor and Chief of Comparative Pathology, Department of Comparative Medicine & Histology and Imaging Core, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor and Chief of Comparative Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA

Suzanne Dintzis

Dr. Suzanne Dintzis is an associate professor of pathology, chief of UW Medical Center Anatomic Pathology Services and director of Pathology Laboratory Operations in the Department of Pathology at the University of Washington. She has over fifteen years experience in surgical pathology with an interest in breast pathology. Dr. Dintzis is actively involved with the planning and implementation of institutional anatomic pathology quality and patient safety process improvements. Her current research interests include breast cancer research and exploring the interfaces between quality of care, transparency and communication. Dr. Dintzis earned her bachelor's degree in biological sciences from Princeton University and her M.D and Ph.D. in biochemistry from Stanford University. She began her residency in anatomic pathology at Stanford University Hospitals and completed her residency and surgical pathology fellowship at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis.

Affiliations and Expertise

Anatomic Pathology Division, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA

Reviews

"…we now have a comparative anatomy and histology book that will be an indispensable reference source for laboratory animal veterinarians and biomedical researchers…the reader will benefit from a healthy sprinkling of physiology that is found throughout the book…it has my strongest recommendation as a ‘got to have it’ book."--Laboratory Animal Practitioner, March 2014
"This volume is an excellent resource with illustrative histological and anatomical figures, comprehensive and comparative descriptions, and recommended references. It will be especially useful to investigations using mice as models of human disease as well as to medical and veterinary pathologists."--Anticancer Research, Volume 33, Issue no. 5, May 2013
"Long overdue, the editors have assembled a vast array of knowledge, protocols, lab lore and practical advice in a concise, well illustrated, and easily accessible volume of practical comparative anatomy of the mouse and human. Students learning anatomy and histology at a practical level by the necessity of the mouse experiments in their laboratories will love this resource. I would recommend that any investigator asking a student, fellow or technician to do mouse necropsy and dissection should provide a copy of this book (and ideally further training in one of the nationally available or online courses in mouse pathology). Even for veterinary pathologists who are more familiar with comparative anatomy, the focus in their training is rarely on the mouse and never on the human. The strict inclusion of just these two species provides an important and practical simplification of critical issues in using the mouse to model human disease. This book is long overdue and much needed in any of the thousands of laboratories performing research with mice."--Alexander D. Borowsky, M.D., D.A.B.P., Associate Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Center for Compa