Biomolecular Interactions Part A

Biomolecular Interactions Part A

1st Edition - October 27, 2021
  • Editor: Arun Shukla
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128233528
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128233511

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Description

Biomolecular Interactions: Part A, Volume 166, the latest release in the Methods in Cell Biology series, highlights new advances in the field, with this new volume presenting interesting chapters on a variety of timely topics in cell biology. Each chapter is written by an international board of authors.

Key Features

  • Provides the authority and expertise of leading contributors from an international board of authors
  • Presents the latest release in the Methods in Cell Biology series
  • Updated release includes the latest information on biomolecular interactions instead of protein-protein interactions

Readership

Academic, government and industrial sectors

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Measuring the rapid kinetics of receptor-ligand interactions in live cells using NanoBRET
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Materials
  • 3: Methods
  • 4: Notes
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Evaluating functional ligand-GPCR interactions in cell-based assays
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Overview of the protocol
  • 3: Step-by-step methods
  • 4: Limitations
  • 5: Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Assays for detecting arrestin interaction with GPCRs
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Direct binding assay between purified arrestin and rhodopsin
  • 3: Brief overview of other assays using purified components
  • 4: Overview of common cell-based arrestin recruitment assays
  • 5: Cell-based arrestin recruitment assays to unmodified GPCRS
  • 6: Summary
  • 7: Key resources table
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 4: BRET-based assay to specifically monitor β2AR/GRK2 interaction and β-arrestin2 conformational change upon βAR stimulation
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Materials
  • 3: Methods
  • 4: Notes
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Cannabinoid receptor CB1 and CB2 interacting proteins: Techniques, progress and perspectives
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Canonical G protein signaling interactions
  • 3: Non-G protein signaling mediators and modulators
  • 4: Receptor oligomerization
  • 5: Interactions influencing subcellular distribution
  • 6: Putative interactors with as yet undefined function
  • 7: Perspectives and future vistas to expand the cannabinoid receptor interactome
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Purinergic GPCR transmembrane residues involved in ligand recognition and dimerization
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: AR and P2YR ligands and structures
  • 3: Analysis of small molecule recognition by TM residues of adenosine receptors
  • 4: Analysis of small molecule recognition by TM residues of P2Y receptors
  • 5: Receptor domains involved in dimerization
  • 6: Summary
  • Acknowledgment
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Nanobodies as sensors of GPCR activation and signaling
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Nanobodies as emerging tools to study GPCR activation and signaling
  • 3: Examples of using nanobodies to probe KOR activation
  • 4: Step-by-step protocols
  • 5: Data analysis
  • 6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Confocal and TIRF microscopy based approaches to visualize arrestin trafficking in living cells
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Arrestins roles in GPCR trafficking and signaling
  • 3: β-arrestin trafficking to the PM
  • 4: β-arrestin actions from the PM
  • 5: β-arrestin actions from endocytic compartments
  • 6: Significance of arrestin trafficking
  • 7: Overview of the protocols
  • 8: Step-by-step methods
  • 9: Additional methods
  • 10: Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Strategies for targeting cell surface proteins using multivalent conjugates and chemical biology
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Discussion
  • 3: Conclusions and future directions
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Identifying Plasmodium falciparum receptor activation using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)-based biosensors in HEK293 cells
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Identifying Plasmodium falciparum receptors: BRET principles
  • 3: Before you begin
  • 4: Key resources table
  • 5: Materials and equipment
  • 6: Step-by-step method details
  • 7: Expected outcomes
  • 8: Quantification and statistical analysis
  • 9: Advantages
  • 10: Limitations
  • 11: Optimization and troubleshooting
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Methods for binding analysis of small GTP-binding proteins with their effectors
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay
  • 3: Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP)
  • 4: Notes
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Investigating protein expression, modifications and interactions in the brain: Protocol for preparing rodent brain tissue for mass spectrometry-based quantitative- and phospho-proteomics analysis
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Mass spectrometry-based proteomics
  • 3: Protein-protein interactions in neurodegenerative disorders
  • 4: Overview of the protocol
  • 5: Step-by-step protocol
  • 6: Summary
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 13: Protein-protein interactions at a glance: Protocols for the visualization of biomolecular interactions
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Protein-protein interaction network
  • 3: Protein structures and protein complexes
  • 4: Protein-protein interface: shape and chemical complementarity
  • 5: Protein complexes in motion
  • 6: Photorealistic representations of protein complexes
  • 7: Protein-protein interactions: hot spots and small molecule design
  • 8: Selectivity of protein interactions
  • 9: Summary and outlook
  • Acknowledgments
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Interactions between noncoding RNAs as epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in cardiovascular diseases
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Molecular functions of the different classes of regulatory ncRNAs
  • 3: Interactions between the different types of noncoding RNAs in cardiovascular diseases
  • 4: Perspectives and therapeutic applications of noncoding RNAs in CVDs
  • 5: Conclusion
  • Competing interest
  • References

Product details

  • No. of pages: 368
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2021
  • Published: October 27, 2021
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128233528
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780128233511

About the Serial Volume Editor

Arun Shukla

Arun Shukla
Dr. Arun K. Shukla obtained his M.Sc. (Master in Science) from the Center for Biotechnology at the Jawaharlal Nehru University in New Delhi, India. Dr. Shukla did his Ph.D. from the Department of Molecular Membrane Biology at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics in Frankfurt, Germany. His Ph.D. research work was focused on structural studies of G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs).

Dr. Shukla subsequently carried out his post-doctoral work in the Department of Medicine at the Duke University in North Carolina, USA. During his post-doctoral research work, Dr. Shukla focused on understanding the biophysical and structural basis of ß-arrestin mediated regulation of GPCRs and non-canonical GPCR signaling. Dr. Shukla has served as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at the Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, USA.

Dr. Shukla is currently an Assistant Professor in Department of Biological Sciences and Bioengineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. Dr. Shukla is also an Intermediate Fellow of the Wellcome Trust-DBT India Alliance. The research program in Dr. Shukla’s laboratory is focused on understanding the molecular mechanism of activation, signaling and regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors.

Affiliations and Expertise

Assistant Professor, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India