Biomimetic Technologies - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081002490, 9780081002605

Biomimetic Technologies

1st Edition

Principles and Applications

Editors: Trung Dung Ngo
eBook ISBN: 9780081002605
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081002490
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 22nd July 2015
Page Count: 394
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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Part One: Principles and Materials for Biomimetic Technologies
    • 1: Synthesis of molecular biomimetics
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Building blocks
      • 1.3 Bottom-up arrangement
      • 1.4 Supramolecular organization
      • 1.5 Conclusions and perspectives
    • 2: Bio-inspired fiber composites
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Biological materials
      • 2.3 Sources of bio-inspiration
      • 2.4 Multifunctional bio-inspired composites
      • 2.5 Difficulties in applying bio-inspiration to composites: the case of superhydrophobicity
      • 2.6 Conclusions and future perspectives
    • 3: Solving the bio-machine interface—a synthetic biology approach
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Definition of the bio-machine interface
      • 3.3 Historical perspective
      • 3.4 Cells as biosensors
      • 3.5 Difficulties in addressing the bio-electronic interface
      • 3.6 Synthetic biology applied to the bio-electronic interface
      • 3.7 Genetic programs that perform signal processing
      • 3.8 Optogenetics for interfacing cells/tissue with machines
      • 3.9 Conclusions
  • Part Two: Bio-Inspired Sensors
    • 4: Biomimetic tactile sensing
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Human sense of touch
      • 4.3 Biomimetic artificial touch
      • 4.4 Case study of tactile sensing technology: the POSFET device
      • 4.5 Other examples of bio-inspired tactile sensing
      • 4.6 Conclusion
    • 5: Bio-inspired hair-based inertial sensors
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Hair structures for inertial sensing
      • 5.3 Cricket-inspired accelerometer
      • 5.4 Fly-inspired gyroscope
      • 5.5 Bio-inspiration continued
      • 5.6 Conclusions
    • 6: Artificial olfactory sense and recognition system
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 The human olfactory sense and creating common perceptions of odors
      • 6.3 The olfactory sensor system for the e-nose
      • 6.4 Olfactory classification—data processing
      • 6.5 Conclusions
    • 7: Bio-inspired engineered sonar systems based on the understanding of bat echolocation
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Background
      • 7.3 Learning from bats
      • 7.4 Bio-inspired sonar applications
      • 7.5 Summary and conclusions
  • Part Three: Biomimetic Actuators
    • 8: Conducting interpenetrating polymer networks actuators for biomimetic vision system
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Interpenetrated polymer network as solid polymer electrolyte
      • 8.3 Conducting interpenetrating polymer networks actuators
      • 8.4 Biomimetic vision systems
      • 8.5 Conclusion
    • 9: Self-oscillating polymer gels as novel biomimetic materials
      • Abstract
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Design of self-oscillating polymer gel
      • 9.3 Control of self-oscillating chemomechanical behaviors
      • 9.4 Design of biomimetic soft actuators
      • 9.5 Design of autonomous mass transport systems
      • 9.6 Self-oscillating fluids
      • 9.7 Future prospects
    • 10: Biomimetic muscle—The slipping/sliding friction mechanism (SFM) for dynamic agile animal robots
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 The need for a biomimetic muscle
      • 10.2 Review of biomimetic artificial muscles
      • 10.3 Reasons for the inadequate performance of existing biomimetic muscles
      • 10.4 Theory and definitions
      • 10.5 Working principle of biological skeletal muscle
      • 10.6 Modeling skeletal muscle
      • 10.7 Description of the SFM
      • 10.8 Model of the SFM
      • 10.9 SFM basic control methodology
      • 10.10 Conclusions and future work
  • Part Four: Applications of Biomimetic Technologies
    • 11: Artificial intelligence through symbolic connectionism—A biomimetic rapprochement
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 It is a question of language
      • 11.3 Localist symbolic connectionism
      • 11.4 Distributed symbolic connectionism
      • 11.5 Symbolic connectionism in biological models
      • 11.6 Neurofuzzy systems
      • 11.7 Future trends
    • 12: Implementation of biomimetic central pattern generators on field-programmable gate array
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 State of the art on CPG implementation
      • 12.3 Stakes and challenges
    • 13: Bio-inspired multi-robot systems
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Background
      • 13.3 Ant-inspired multi-robot coordination
      • 13.4 Bee-inspired multi-robot coordination
      • 13.5 Future trends
      • 13.6 Conclusions
    • 14: Bio-inspired climbing robots
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Bio-inspired adhesion technologies
      • 14.3 Bio-inspired locomotion mechanisms
      • 14.4 Size and current technology constrains
      • 14.5 Future trends
    • 15: Locomotion rhythm generation using pulse-type hardware neural networks for quadruped robots
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Quadruped robot system
      • 15.3 Mechanical components of the quadruped robot
      • 15.4 Electrical components of the quadruped robot
      • 15.5 Results
      • 15.6 Conclusions
    • 16: Biologically inspired antenna array design using Ormia modeling
      • Abstract
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Biologically inspired coupled antenna array for DOA estimation
      • 16.3 Biologically inspired coupled antenna beam pattern design
      • 16.4 Numerical results
      • 16.5 Summary
      • Appendix A Definition of block matrix operators
      • Appendix B Computation of the electromagnetic coupling matrix C
  • Index

Description

Biomimetic engineering takes the principles of biological organisms and copies, mimics or adapts these in the design and development of new materials and technologies. Biomimetic Technologies reviews the key materials and processes involved in this groundbreaking field, supporting theoretical background by outlining a range of applications.

Beginning with an overview of the key principles and materials associated with biomimetic technologies in Part One, the book goes on to explore biomimetic sensors in more detail in Part Two, with bio-inspired tactile, hair-based, gas-sensing and sonar systems all reviewed. Biomimetic actuators are then the focus of Part Three, with vision systems, tissue growth and muscles all discussed. Finally, a wide range of applications are investigated in Part Four, where biomimetic technology and artificial intelligence are reviewed for such uses as bio-inspired climbing robots and multi-robot systems, microrobots with CMOS IC neural networks locomotion control, central pattern generators (CPG’s) and biologically inspired antenna arrays.

Key Features

  • Includes a solid overview of modern artificial intelligence as background to the principles of biomimetic engineering
  • Reviews a selection of key bio-inspired materials and sensors, highlighting their current strengths and future potential
  • Features cutting-edge examples of biomimetic technologies employed for a broad range of applications

Readership

Postgraduate students and academic researchers in electronics, sensors, functional materials, robotics, physics, materials science, and bio-engineering and mechanical engineering; R&D managers in industrial sectors such as biotechnology, sensors, actuators, electronics, robotics, manufacturing, and structural and environmental monitoring.


Details

No. of pages:
394
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081002605
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081002490

About the Editors

Trung Dung Ngo Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Aalborg University, Denmark