Biomaterials Nanoarchitectonics

Biomaterials Nanoarchitectonics

1st Edition - February 11, 2016
  • Editor: Mitsuhiro Ebara
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323374996
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323371278

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Description

Biomaterials Nanoarchitectonics, written from the perspectives of authors form NIMS and other researchers worldwide, provides readers with an explanation of the theory and techniques of nanoarchitectonics, exploring its applications in biomedical fields, including regenerative medicine, drug delivery, and diagnostic and treatment systems based on pathogenic mechanisms. The book also explains the use of nanomaterials that enable 'materials therapy', in which the materials themselves elicit a sustainable, curative effect from living tissue.

Key Features

  • Authored by the team that coined the term nanoarchitectonics, who explain their approach to the design of smart/functional nanomaterials and their applications in the biomedical arena
  • Explores how materials designed and produced with nanoarchitectonics methods can be used to enhance the natural regenerative power of the human body
  • Enables scientists and researchers to gain a deeper understanding of the specific challenges of materials design at the nanoscale

Readership

Scientists and engineers involved in materials design and biomedical applications of nanomaterials, materials scientists, polymer chemists, biomedical scientists, biotechnologists

Table of Contents

    • List of Contributors
    • 1: Introductory Guide to Nanoarchitectonics
      • Abstract
      • 1.1. From Nanotechnology to Nanoarchitectonics
      • 1.2. Challenges in Biomaterials Research
    • 2: Drug and Gene Delivery Technologies
      • 2.1: Nanoparticles
        • Abstract
        • 2.1.1. Introduction
        • 2.1.2. Micelles
        • 2.1.3. Vesicles
        • 2.1.4. Conjugated Nanoparticles
        • 2.1.5. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 2.2: Supermolecules
        • Abstract
        • 2.2.1. Introduction: Basics of Supramolecular Chemistry
        • 2.2.2. Drug Delivery Systems With Host–Guest Systems
        • 2.2.3. Drug Delivery Systems With Supramolecular Assemblies
        • 2.2.4. Interfacial Supramolecular Systems for Mechanically Controlled Drug Delivery Systems
        • 2.2.5. Conclusions and Future Perspectives
      • 2.3: Injectable Hydrogels
        • Abstract
        • 2.3.1. Introduction
        • 2.3.2. Chemical Gel (Covalent Network) Systems
        • 2.3.3. Physical Gel (Noncovalent Network) Systems
        • 2.3.4. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 2.4: Nature-Inspired Polymers
        • Abstract
        • 2.4.1. Introduction
        • 2.4.2. Carbohydrate-Inspired Polymers
        • 2.4.3. Peptide/Protein-Inspired Polymers
        • 2.4.4. Conclusion and Future Trends
    • 3: Regenerative Medicines
      • 3.1: Preparation of Polymer Scaffolds by Ice Particulate Method for Tissue Engineering
        • Abstract
        • 3.1.1. Introduction
        • 3.1.2. Preparation of Funnel-Like Polymer Porous Scaffolds
        • 3.1.3. Preparation of Micropatterned Polymer Porous Scaffolds
        • 3.1.4. Preparation of Porous Scaffolds of Biodegradable Synthetic Polymers
        • 3.1.5. Preparation of Porous Scaffolds of Biodegradable Naturally Derived Polymers
        • 3.1.6. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 3.2: Cell Sheet Technologies
        • Abstract
        • 3.2.1. Introduction
        • 3.2.2. Nanostructure of Thermoresponsive Cell Culture Surfaces Facilitates Cell Sheet Formation and Manipulation
        • 3.2.3. ECM-Mimicking Nanostructure on Thermoresponsive Cell Culture Surfaces for Creating Functional Cell Sheets
        • 3.2.4. Spatially Organized Three-Dimensional Tissue Reconstruction Using Cell Sheet Technologies
        • 3.2.5. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 3.3: Cell Manipulation Technologies
        • Abstract
        • 3.3.1. Introduction
        • 3.3.2. Development History of Photoactivatable Substrates
        • 3.3.3. Conclusions and Future Trends
        • Acknowledgments
    • 4: Diagnostics Technologies
      • 4.1: Point-of-Care Diagnostics
        • Abstract
        • 4.1.1. Introduction
        • 4.1.2. Diagnostics Targeting Proteins
        • 4.1.3. Diagnostics Targeting Nucleic Acids
        • 4.1.4. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 4.2: Biosensors
        • Abstract
        • 4.2.1. Conventional Biosensors and Biosensing Techniques
        • 4.2.2. Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors
        • 4.2.3. Field-Effect Transistor-Based Biosensors
        • 4.2.4. Gold Nanoparticles-Based Optically Detectable Biosensors
        • 4.2.5. Summary
      • 4.3: Nanomechanical Sensors
        • Abstract
        • 4.3.1. Introduction
        • 4.3.2. Nanomechanical Sensors
        • 4.3.3. Functionalization of Nanomechanical Sensors
        • 4.3.4. Nanomechanical Sensing of Biomolecules
        • 4.3.5. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 4.4: Theranostics
        • Abstract
        • 4.4.1. Introduction
        • 4.4.2. Concept of Nanotheranostics
        • 4.4.3. Metallic Nanomaterials for Theranostics
        • 4.4.4. Carbon-Based Nanomaterials for Theranostics
        • 4.4.5. Polymer-Based Theranostics Nanomaterials
        • 4.4.6. Conclusion and Future Prospects
    • 5: Next Generation Technologies
      • 5.1: Self-Oscillating Polymer Materials
        • Abstract
        • 5.1.1. Introduction
        • 5.1.2. Design of Self-Oscillating Polymer Gels
        • 5.1.3. Design of Biomimetic Soft Actuators
        • 5.1.4. Design of Autonomous Mass Transport Systems
        • 5.1.5. Self-Oscillating Functional Fluids
        • 5.1.6. Self-Oscillating Block Copolymers
        • 5.1.7. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 5.2: Soft Shape-Memory Materials
        • Abstract
        • 5.2.1. Introduction
        • 5.2.2. Classification of Shape-Memory Materials
        • 5.2.3. Biomedical Applications of Shape-Memory Materials
        • 5.2.4. Conclusions and Perspectives
      • 5.3: Cell Surface Engineering via Methacryloyl-Derivatized Carbohydrates
        • Abstract
        • 5.3.1. Introduction
        • 5.3.2. Surface Modification of Mammalian Cells
        • 5.3.3. Metabolic Surface Engineering of Living Cells
        • 5.3.4. Metabolic Delivery of Methacryloyl Groups into Carbohydrates
        • 5.3.5. Surface Modification of Mammalian Cells With Thermoresponsive Polymers
        • 5.3.6. Preparation of Glycol Protein-Conjugated Hydrogels
        • 5.3.7. Conclusions and Future Perspectives
      • 5.4: Fibrous Materials
        • Abstract
        • 5.4.1. Introduction
        • 5.4.2. Physical Signal-Responsive Fibers
        • 5.4.3. Chemical Signal-Responsive Fibers
        • 5.4.4. Conclusions and Future Trends
      • 5.5: On/Off Switchable Interfaces
        • Abstract
        • 5.5.1. Introduction
        • 5.5.2. Design of On/Off Switchable Surfaces for Biomaterials
        • 5.5.3. Type of On/Off Switchable Surfaces
        • 5.5.4. Conclusions and Future Trends
    • Author Index
    • Subject Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 362
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © William Andrew 2016
  • Published: February 11, 2016
  • Imprint: William Andrew
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323374996
  • Hardcover ISBN: 9780323371278

About the Editor

Mitsuhiro Ebara

Mitsuhiro Ebara is a senior researcher at National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba in Japan. He received Ph.D in Chemical Engineering from Waseda University, Tokyo in Japan. From 2004 to 2006, he was a post-doctoral fellow in Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington, Seattle, USA. From 2007 to 2008, he was an assistant professor in Medical Center for Translational Research at Osaka University Hospital, Osaka, Japan. Since 2009, he has joined NIMS. He has received more than 10 awards including the Minister of Science and Education Award in 2003, Young Scientist Award from 9th World Biomaterials Congress in 2012, Award for Young Investigator of Japanese Society for Biomaterials in 2015.

Affiliations and Expertise

National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba-city, Ibaraki, Japan