Description

Cancer can affect people of all ages, and approximately one in three people are estimated to be diagnosed with cancer during their lifetime. Extensive research is being undertaken by many different institutions to explore potential new therapeutics, and biomaterials technology is now being developed to target, treat and prevent cancer. This unique book discusses the role and potential of biomaterials in treating this prevalent disease.

The first part of the book discusses the fundamentals of biomaterials for cancer therapeutics. Chapters in part two discuss synthetic vaccines, proteins and polymers for cancer therapeutics. Part three focusses on theranosis and drug delivery systems, whilst the final set of chapters look at biomaterial therapies and cancer cell interaction.

This extensive book provides a complete overview of the latest research into the potential of biomaterials for the diagnosis, therapy and prevention of cancer. Biomaterials for cancer therapeutics is an essential text for academics, scientists and researchers within the biomedical industry, and will also be of interest to clinicians with a research interest in cancer therapies and biomaterials.

Key Features

  • A complete overview of the latest research into the potential of biomaterials for the diagnosis, therapy and prevention of cancer
  • Discusses the fundamentals of biomaterials for cancer therapeutics
  • Discusses synthetic vaccines, proteins and polymers for cancer therapeutics

Readership

Engineers/scientists working in the field of biomaterials with an emphasis on technologies for cancer; Researchers in pharmaceutical sciences, nanotechnologies, and related field

Table of Contents

Contributor contact details

Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials

Preface

Chapter 1: Introduction to biomaterials for cancer therapeutics

Abstract:

1.1 Introduction

1.2 Biomaterials used in cancer therapeutics

1.3 Materials used in anticancer formulations

1.4 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 2: Cancer cell biology

Abstract:

2.1 Introduction

2.2 Public perception and misunderstanding of cancer cell activity

2.3 The ‘War on Cancer’

2.4 The genetic basis of cancer

2.5 Cancer interface with the environment

2.6 Cancer cells as moving targets

2.7 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 3: Targeted drug delivery for cancer therapy

Abstract:

3.1 Introduction

3.2 Current paradigm

3.3 Challenges to current paradigm

3.4 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 4: Chemical synthesis of carbohydrate-based vaccines against cancers

Abstract:

4.1 Introduction

4.2 Semi-synthetic vaccines

4.3 Fully synthetic vaccines

4.4 Conclusion and future trends

Chapter 5: Generating functional mutant proteins to create highly bioactive anticancer biopharmaceuticals

Abstract:

5.1 Introduction

5.2 Artificial proteins for cancer therapy

5.3 How to create functional mutant proteins as beneficial therapeutics

5.4 Mutant TNFα for cancer therapy

5.5 Conclusion and future trends

5.6 Sources of further information and advice

Chapter 6: Polymer therapeutics for treating cancer

Abstract:

6.1 Introduction

6.2 Polyamines and polyamine analogs

6.3 Polymeric P-glycoprotein (Pgp) inhibitors

6.4 Conclusion and future trends

6.5 Acknowledgment

Chapter 7: Nanotechnology for cancer screening and diagnosis

Abstract:

7.1

Details

No. of pages:
530
Language:
English
Copyright:
© 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857096760
Print ISBN:
9780857096647

About the editor

Reviews

"On the whole, the book is a combination of the fundamentals of cancer biology, guiding principles on the design of biomaterials and the clinical potential of these biomaterials, which is of interest to a broad audience involving chemists, biologist and material scientists."--Biomat.net, June 2014
"Intended for researchers, this collection introduces new methods for delivering drugs to cancer cells and tumors and innovative technologies for treating cancers with biomaterials. Needham …describes his low temperature-sensitive liposome (Thermodox) drug delivery system, which failed to meet its primary endpoint in a phase III trial of liver cancer."--ProtoView.com, February 2014