Biochemistry of Foods - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780122423505, 9780323158961

Biochemistry of Foods

1st Edition

Authors: N.A.M. Eskin
eBook ISBN: 9780323158961
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 28th January 1971
Page Count: 252
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Description

Biochemistry of Foods attempts to emphasize the importance of biochemistry in the rapidly developing field of food science, and to provide a deeper understanding of those chemical changes occurring in foods. The development of acceptable fruits and vegetables on postharvest storage is dependent on critical biochemical transformations taking place within the plant organ. The chapters discuss how meat and fish similarly undergo postmortem chemical changes which affect their consumer acceptability. In addition to natural changes, those induced by processing or mechanical injury affect the quality of foods. Such changes can be controlled through an understanding of the chemical reactions involved, for instance, in enzymic and nonenzymic browning. Increased sophistication in food production has resulted in the widespread use of enzymes in food-processing operations. Some of the more important enzymes are discussed, with an emphasis on their role in the food industry. The final chapter is concerned with the biodeterioration of foods. The various microorganisms involved in the degradation of proteins, carbohydrates, oils, and fats are discussed, with special reference to the individual biochemical reactions responsible for food deterioration.

Table of Contents


Preface

Acknowledgments

1. Biochemical Changes in Foods: Meat and Fish

I. Introduction

II. The Nature of Muscle

III. Conversion of Muscle to Meat and Edible Fish

IV. Changes Produced in Meat and Fish by the Naturally Occurring Microflora

References

2. Biochemical Changes in Foods: Plants Postharvest Changes in Fruits and Vegetables

I. Introduction

II. Respiration

III. Initiation of Ripening

IV. Color Changes in Fruits and Vegetables

V. Textural Changes during Postharvest Storage

VI. Flavor Production

VII. Postharvest Changes in Carbohydrates

VIII. Changes in Lipids during Storage

IX. Protein Synthesis

X. Organic Acids

XI. Storage of Fruits and Vegetables

References

3. Browning Reactions in Foods

I. Introduction

II. Enzymic Browning

III. Phenolase in Foods and Food Processing

IV. Nonenzymic Browning

References

4. Enzymes in the Food Industry

I. Introduction

II. Early Work on Biological Catalysis

III. Properties of Enzymes

IV. Commercial Availability of Enzymes

V. Enzyme Applications

VI. New Developments in Food Enzyme Technology—Bound Enzymes

References

5. The Biodeterioration of Foods

I. Introduction

II. General Aspects of Microbial Deterioration of Foods

III. Microbial Deterioration of Carbohydrates

IV. Microbiological Deterioration of Proteins and Protein Foods

V. Microbiological Deterioration of Edible Oils and Fats

References

Author Index

Subject Index

Details

No. of pages:
252
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 1971
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780323158961

About the Author

N.A.M. Eskin

Affiliations and Expertise

Department of Foods & Nutrition Faculty of Human Ecology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada R3T 2N2