Bacterial Immunoglobulin-binding Proteins V1

Bacterial Immunoglobulin-binding Proteins V1

1st Edition - November 28, 1989

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  • Author: Michael D.P. Boyle
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323140584

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Description

Bacterial Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins, Volume 1: Microbiology, Chemistry, and Biology investigates the immunoglobulin and Fc-binding proteins that have been isolated and characterized from a wide array of microorganisms, including protein A from staphylococcus and protein G from streptococcus. It examines the antigenic relationships among bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins, the immunoglobulin D-binding bacteria, the complement activation and bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins, the nature of the interaction of bacterial Fc receptors and immunoglobulin G, and the bacterial Fc receptors as putative virulence factors. Organized into 31 chapters, this volume begins with a historical overview of bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins, receptors for immunoglobulins, amino acid sequence of Fc receptors, and cloning of genes. It then discusses the staphylococcal protein A, including its biological activities and applications to immunotechnology. The book also explains the gene for staphylococcal protein A, immunoglobulin G Fc receptors of group A streptococci, and streptococcal protein G. It presents the structure and evolution of the streptococcal genes encoding protein G and interaction of bacterial immunoglobulin receptors with sites in the Fab region. It also discusses the lymphocyte stimulation by bacterial Fc receptors and cloning and expression of the beta protein gene of group B streptococci. The book concludes with a chapter on Fc receptors and the pathogenesis of bacterial infections in animals. This book will be of interest to biologists, microbiologists, chemists, and researchers working with immunoglobulin-binding proteins found in bacteria.

Table of Contents


  • Contributors

    Foreword

    1 Historical perspective

    I. Background

    II. Protein A: Fc Receptor Type I

    III. Fc Receptors in ß-Hemolytic Streptococci

    IV. Alternative Ig Binding: Nonimmune Fab Binding

    V. Other Receptors for Immunoglobulins

    VI. Amino Acid Sequence of Fc Receptors and Cloning of Genes

    VII. Concluding Remarks

    References

    2 The type I bacterial immunoglobulin-binding protein: Staphylococcal protein A

    I. Introduction

    II. Biological Activities of Protein A

    III. Applications of Protein A to Immunotechnology

    IV. Summary

    References

    3 The gene for staphylococcal protein A

    I. Cloning and Sequencing of the Gene

    II. The Structure of the Gene

    III. Expression of the Cloned Protein A Gene in Different Species

    IV. Comparison of Protein A to Streptococcal Protein G

    V. Chimeric Fc Receptors

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    4 Morphological distribution of Fc receptors on group A streptococci

    I. Introduction

    II. Electron Microscopic Demonstration of Fc Receptors

    References

    5 Immunoglobulin G Fc receptors of group A streptococci

    I. Introduction

    II. The Detection of IgG Fc Receptor Activity in Group A Streptococci

    III. Classification of IgG Fc Receptors

    IV. Restricted Binding of Human IgG by Group A Streptococcal Fc Receptors

    V. Precipitation in Gel of Human Normal Sera by Group A Streptococcal Fc Receptor

    VI. Isolation of an Allotype-Specific Fc Receptor from Group A Streptococci

    VII. Purification of an Fc Receptor with Unrestricted Binding of Human IgG from Group A Streptococci

    VIII. Relation between IgG Fc Receptor and Other Factors of Group A Streptococci

    IX. Monoclonal Antibody to Group A Streptococcal Fc Receptor

    X. Concluding Remarks

    References

    6 Type Ila and type lib immunoglobulin-binding proteins associated with group A streptococci

    Text

    References

    7 Type II immunoglobulin receptor and its gene

    I. Immunoglobulin G Receptors of Group A Streptococci

    II. The frcA Gene

    III. The FcRA76 Protein Deduced from the Nucleotide Sequence

    IV. Evolutionary Relationship between FcRA and M Proteins

    References

    8 Type III Fc immunoglobulin-binding proteins from a group C streptococcus: Isolation and characterization

    I. Introduction

    II. Purification of a Type III Immunoglobulin-Binding Protein

    III. Functional Properties of Type III Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins

    IV. Comparison of the Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins Expressed by Human Group C and Group G Streptococci

    V. Summary

    References

    9 Streptococcal protein G

    I. Introduction

    II. Purification of Protein G

    III. Structure

    IV. Binding Specificity and Affinity

    V. Interaction with Other Proteins

    VI. Some Functional Aspects of Protein G

    References

    10 Type III Fc receptors from streptococci of serological group L

    I. Introduction

    II. Interactions of L Streptococci with Immunoglobulin G

    III. Isolation and Characterization of IgG Fc Receptors

    IV. Conclusions

    References

    11 Structure and evolution of the streptococcal genes encoding protein G

    I. Structure of Protein G

    II. Structural Variation

    III. Relation to Other Gram-Positive Cell Wall Proteins

    IV. Localization of Functional Regions

    V. Expression of the Cloned Gene in Recombinant Hosts

    References

    12 Type IV bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins

    Text

    Summary

    References

    13 Type V Fc receptor from Streptococcus zooepidemicus

    I. Introduction

    II. Isolation, Purification, and Physical Characteristics

    III. Distribution among Isolates

    IV. Functional Activity

    V. Summary

    References

    14 Isolation and characterization of a type VI immunoglobulin-binding protein

    Text

    References

    15 Antigenic relationships among bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins

    I. Introduction

    II. Antigenically and Functionally Distinct Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins

    III. Antigenically Related and Functionally Related Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins

    IV. Antigenically Related and Functionally Distinct Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins

    V. Summary

    References

    16 Group A streptococcal immunoglobulin A Fc receptors

    I. Introduction

    II. Binding of the Fc Part of Human IgA to Some Group A Streptococci

    III. Presence of IgA Fc Receptor in Different Types of Group A Streptococci

    IV. Separation of the IgA Fc Receptor from Other Streptococcal Factors

    V. Characterization of the IgA Fc Receptor

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    17 Protein Arp, the immunoglobulin A receptor of group A streptococci

    I. Introduction

    II. Binding Properties of Strains Expressing Protein Arp

    III. Expression of Protein Arp in Escherichia coli

    IV. Sequence Studies: Relationship of Protein Arp to Streptococcal M Proteins

    V. Genetic Regulation of the Protein Arp Gene

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    18 Immunoglobulin A Fc-binding proteins associated with group B streptococci

    I. Introduction

    II. Identification of IgA Fc-Binding Proteins Expressed by Group B Streptococci

    III. Binding of slgA by IgA Fc-Binding Strains of Group B Streptococci

    IV. Identification of ß Antigen Expressed by Group B Streptococci

    V. Comparison of ß Antigen and IgA Fc-Binding Proteins

    VI. Expression of ß Antigen/IgA Fc-Binding Proteins by Individual Colonies of Group B Streptococci

    VII. Relationship of Low-Molecular-Weight Secreted ß Antigen to Other Forms of the Molecule

    VIII. Affinity Purification of Low-Molecule-Weight Secreted ß Antigen

    IX. IgG Fc Binding by Group B Streptococci

    X. Summary

    References

    19 Cloning and expression of the ß protein gene of group B streptococci and a study of its product's binding capacity to human IgA

    I. Introduction

    II. Cloning of the ß Protein Gene in Escherichia coli

    III. Subcloning of the ß Gene into Plasmid Vectors

    IV. Western Blot Analysis of the Recombinant ß Antigen

    V. Mutagenesis of the ß Protein Gene

    VI. The IgA-Binding Capacity of the Recombinant ß Protein

    VII. Discussion

    References

    20 Immunoglobulin D-binding bacteria

    I. Introduction

    II. Species of Bacteria That Bind IgD

    III. Branhamella catarrhalis as a B Cell Mitogen

    IV. Structure of the IgD Receptor

    V. Summary

    References

    21 Interaction of bacterial immunoglobulin receptors with sites in the Fab region

    I. Introduction

    II. Immunoglobulin-Binding Bacterial Species

    III. Reactivity of Immunoglobulin

    IV. Biological Significance of Fab Binding

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    22 Receptor for immunoglobulins in Clostridium perfringens: Binding in the F(ab')2 region

    I. Introduction

    II. Binding of IgM to Clostridium perfringens

    III. Purification of the Binding Structure, Protein P

    IV. Previous Reports on the Binding of IgM to Bacterial Proteins to Whole Bacteria

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    23 Protein L: A peptococcal cell wall protein with affinity for immunoglobulin light chains

    I. Introduction

    II. Purification

    III. Structure

    IV. Specificity and Affinity

    V. Some Biological Aspects of Protein L

    References

    24 Lymphocyte stimulation by bacterial Fc receptors

    I. Introduction

    II. Lymphocyte Stimulation by the Type I Fc Receptor, Staphylococcal Protein A

    III. Lymphocyte Stimulation by the Type III Fc Receptor from Streptococci

    IV. Methodological Problems in Studies of Fc Receptor-Induced Lymphocyte Activation

    V. Conclusions

    References

    25 Complement activation and bacterial immunoglobulin-binding proteins

    I. Introduction

    II. Complement Activation by Bacterial Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins

    III. Hypersensitivity Reactions

    IV. Clearance of Bacteria Expressing Immunoglobulin-Binding Proteins

    V. Summary

    References

    26 The nature of the interaction of bacterial Fc receptors and IgG

    I. Introduction

    II. Structure of IgG

    III. Domain Structure of IgG

    IV. Structure of Fc

    V. Interaction between Bacterial Fc Receptors and IgG

    VI. Summary

    References

    27 Relationships between human rheumatoid factors and types I, II, and III bacterial Fc receptors

    I. Introduction

    II. Similarities of Binding Specificities of Human Rheumatoid Factors and Bacterial Fc Receptors

    III. Conformational Similarities between the Antigen-Combining Regions of Rheumatoid Factors and the Fc-Binding Regions of Bacterial Fc Receptors

    IV. Generation of Rheumatoid Factors by Bacterial FcRs

    References

    28 Therapeutic extracorporeal immunoadsorption with type I Fc receptor in systemic lupus erythematosus

    I. Introduction

    II. Patient Population

    III. Immunoadsorption Therapy Procedure

    IV. Adverse Reactions

    V. Clinical, Laboratory, and Immunological Findings during Therapy

    VI. In Vitro Column Studies

    VII. Discussion

    References

    29 Bacterial Fc receptors as putative virulence factors

    I. Introduction

    II. Possible Virulence Mechanisms

    III. Role of Protein A in Staphylococcal Virulence

    IV. Effect of Classic Laboratory Methods for Manipulation of Streptococcal Virulence in IgG Fc Receptors

    V. Binding of Immunoglobulins in Nephritogenic and Nonnephritogenic Streptococci

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    30 Potential role of the ß antigen (IgA Fc-binding protein) in the pathogenesis of group B streptococcal infections

    I. Introduction

    II. History of Group B Streptococcal Infections

    III. Typing of Group B Streptococci

    IV. Antibody Protection Experiments in Mice

    V. Incidence of a and ß Antigens on Group B Isolates and the Incidence of Specific Human Antibodies against These Antigens

    VI. Effect of the c Protein in Opsonophagocytosis and Killing of GBS

    VII. Relationship of the ß Antigen and IgA-Binding Ability

    VIII. Summary

    References

    31 Fc receptors and the pathogenesis of bacterial infections in animals

    I. Introduction

    II. Immunoglobulin Fc Receptors of Veterinary Bacterial Pathogens

    III. Effect of Bacterial Fc Receptors on Immunological Mechanisms

    IV. The Pathogenesis of Infections with Fc Receptor-Bearing Organisms

    V. Conclusions

    References

    Index






Product details

  • No. of pages: 409
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 1989
  • Published: November 28, 1989
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323140584

About the Author

Michael D.P. Boyle

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