Antimicrobial Food Packaging - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780128007235, 9780128008102

Antimicrobial Food Packaging

1st Edition

Editors: Jorge Barros-Velazquez
eBook ISBN: 9780128008102
Hardcover ISBN: 9780128007235
Imprint: Academic Press
Published Date: 4th January 2016
Page Count: 676
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Description

Antimicrobial Food Packaging takes an interdisciplinary approach to provide a complete and robust understanding of packaging from some of the most well-known international experts. This practical reference provides basic information and practical applications for the potential uses of various films in food packaging, describes the different types of microbial targets (fungal, bacteria, etc.), and focuses on the applicability of techniques to industry.

Tactics on the monitoring of microbial activity that use antimicrobial packaging detection of food borne pathogens, the use of biosensors, and testing antimicrobial susceptibility are also included, along with food safety and good manufacturing practices. The book aims to curtail the development of microbiological contamination of food through anti-microbial packaging to improve the safety in the food supply chain.

Key Features

  • Presents the science behind anti-microbial packaging and films reflecting advancements in chemistry, microbiology, and food science
  • Includes the most up-to-date information on regulatory aspects, consumer acceptance, research trends, cost analysis, risk analysis and quality control
  • Discusses the uses of natural and unnatural compounds for food safety and defense

Readership

Professionals in food packaging, food technology, food safety, food scientists and technologists; microbiologists; chemists

Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: The Nature and Extent of Foodborne Disease
    • Abstract
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 Regulation and Directives: United States and European Union
    • 1.3 Estimates of Major Food Pathogens
    • 1.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 2: Resistant and Emergent Pathogens in Food Products
    • Abstract
    • 2.1 Introduction
    • 2.2 Fermentative, Facultative Anaerobic Gram-Negative Bacilli
    • 2.3 Gram-Positive Bacteria
  • Chapter 3: Bacterial Contamination in Food Production
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 3.1 Introduction
    • 3.2 Types and Diversity of Bacteria in Food Contamination
    • 3.3 Molecular Methods for Tracking Bacterial Contamination in Food Production
    • 3.4 Elimination of Bacterial Contamination in Foods
    • 3.5 Conclusions and Future Directions
  • Chapter 4: Fungal Contamination in Packaged Foods
    • Abstract
    • 4.1 Introduction
    • 4.2 Films with Antifungal Activities
    • 4.3 Modified-Atmosphere Packaging
    • 4.4 Conclusions
  • Chapter 5: Viral Contamination of Food
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgment
    • 5.1 Introduction
    • 5.2 Most Important Foodborne Viruses
    • 5.3 Prevalence of Viruses in Food—Results of Some Surveys and Outbreak Occasions
    • 5.4 Knowledge Gaps and Future Trends and Expectations
  • Chapter 6: The Downside of Antimicrobial Packaging: Migration of Packaging Elements into Food
    • Abstract
    • 6.1 Migration in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • 6.2 Dealing with Migration
    • 6.3 Migration of Compounds Other than Antimicrobials
  • Chapter 7: Packaging Material in the Food Industry
    • Abstract
    • 7.1 Introduction
    • 7.2 General Information on Food Packaging Materials
    • 7.3 Polymer Nanocomposites for Packaging Application
    • 7.4 Special Packaging Application
    • 7.5 Conclusions
  • Chapter 8: Effect of Packaging Systems on the Inactivation of Microbiological Agents
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 8.1 Introduction
    • 8.2 Antimicrobial Packaging Films
    • 8.3 Antimicrobial Packaging Substances
    • 8.4 AAs-Matrixes Incorporation Methods
    • 8.5 Effects of AAs on Mechanical and Barrier Properties
    • 8.6 Effectiveness of Antimicrobial Packaging
    • 8.7 Regulatory Issues and Future Trends of AFP
  • Chapter 9: Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Foodborne Bacteria Related to National and International Resistance-Monitoring Programs
    • Abstract
    • 9.1 Introduction
    • 9.2 Susceptibility Testing Methodology
    • 9.3 Overview on Current Programs
    • 9.4 Interpretation of Data
    • 9.5 EASSA Examples
    • 9.6 Concluding Comments
  • Chapter 10: Food Safety: Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), Sanitation Standard Operating Procedures (SSOP), Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP)
    • Abstract
    • 10.1 Introduction
    • 10.2 Prerequisite Programs
    • 10.3 Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point System
    • 10.4 Successful HACCP Implementation
  • Chapter 11: Control of Microbial Activity Using Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 11.1 Introduction
    • 11.2 Substances Used in the Antimicrobial Packaging Development
    • 11.3 Foodborne Pathogens Controlled by Antimicrobial Packaging
    • 11.4 Food Spoilage Microorganisms Controlled by Antimicrobial Packaging
  • Chapter 12: Detection of Foodborne Pathogens Using Biosensors
    • Abstract
    • 12.1 Foodborne Pathogens
    • 12.2 Salmonellosis
    • 12.3 Current Gold Standards in Pathogen Detection
    • 12.4 Problems with Real Samples
    • 12.5 Lab-on-a-Chip for Pathogen Detection
    • 12.6 Lab-on-a-Chip Biosensors for Pathogen Detection Biosensor
    • 12.7 Extraction and Elution of Nucleic Acids
    • 12.8 Paper Microfluidics for Pathogen Detection
    • 12.9 Future Directions
  • Chapter 13: Detection of Foodborne Pathogens Using DNA Arrays
    • Abstract
    • 13.1 Introduction
    • 13.2 Traditional Arrays
    • 13.3 Integrated Array Devices
    • 13.4 Concluding Remarks and Future Trends
  • Chapter 14: Detection of Foodborne Pathogens Using Nanoparticles. Advantages and Trends
    • Abstract
    • 14.1 Introduction
    • 14.2 Nanotechnology and its Contribution to Foodborne Pathogen Detection
    • 14.3 Integration of Nanomaterial-Based Sensors for Pathogen Detection in Food Packaging Systems
  • Chapter 15: Detection of Foodborne Pathogens Using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry
    • Abstract
    • 15.1 Introduction
    • 15.2 Principles of MALDI-TOF MS for Bacterial Identification
    • 15.3 Foodborne Pathogen Detection by MALDI-TOF MS Fingerprinting
    • 15.4 Future Trends
  • Chapter 16: Industrial Applications: Regulatory Issues and Life Cycle Assessment of Food Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 16.1 Main Characteristics of Antimicrobial Packaging
    • 16.2 Global Market and Applications
    • 16.3 The United States' and Europe's Approach to Antimicrobial Food Packaging
    • 16.4 European Legislation on FCM (Regulation 1935/2004/EC) and A&I Packaging (Regulation 450/2009/EC)
    • 16.5 Safety Issues and Compliance
    • 16.6 Environmental Assessment of Food Packaging: Reasons, Relevance, and Methods
    • 16.7 Life Cycle Assessment of Food Packaging
  • Chapter 17: Antimicrobial Packaging for Meat Products
    • Abstract
    • 17.1 Introduction
    • 17.2 Spoilage or Pathogenic Microorganisms in Meat
    • 17.3 Monitoring Techniques for Detecting the Microbial Quality and Spoilage in Meat
    • 17.4 Action Mode of AM Packaging in Meat Products
    • 17.5 Types and Applications of AM Packaging Applied to Meat Products
    • 17.6 Combination of AM Packaging with Other Packaging Techniques
    • 17.7 Commercial Applications
    • 17.8 Conclusions
  • Chapter 18: Antimicrobial Packaging for Fresh and Minimally Processed Fruits and Vegetables
    • Abstract
    • 18.1 Introduction
    • 18.2 Antimicrobial Substances
    • 18.3 Antimicrobial Packaging for Fresh and Minimally Processed Produce
    • 18.4 Future Perspectives in Antimicrobial Packaging for Fresh and Minimally Processed Fruits and Vegetables
    • 18.5 Conclusions
  • Chapter 19: Antimicrobial Packaging for Poultry
    • Abstract
    • 19.1 Introduction
    • 19.2 Antimicrobial Packaging
    • 19.3 Antimicrobial Packaging Materials
    • 19.4 Antimicrobial Agents Used in Food Packaging Materials
    • 19.5 Active and Intelligent Packaging
    • 19.6 Effects of Packaging Systems on Poultry Meat Quality
    • 19.7 Conclusion and Future Directions
  • Chapter 20: Antimicrobial Packaging for Seafood
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 20.1 Introduction
    • 20.2 Elaboration of Films and Coatings
    • 20.3 Biopolymers Used in the Formulation of Films and Coatings for the Preservation of Aquatic Products
    • 20.4 Antimicrobials Incorporated in the Formulation of Films and Coatings for the Preservation of Aquatic Products
    • 20.5 Interactions Between Biopolymers and Antimicrobials: Their Effects on the Functionality of Films and Coatings
    • 20.6 Uses of Films and Coatings for the Preservation of Aquatic Products
    • 20.7 Conclusions and Future Perpectives
  • Chapter 21: Antimicrobial Packaging of Beverages
    • Abstract
    • 21.1 Active Packaging of Beverages
    • 21.2 Physical Techniques for Cold Pasteurization of Packaged Beverages
  • Chapter 22: Antimicrobial Active Packaging Systems Based on EVOH Copolymers
    • Abstract
    • 22.1 Introduction
    • 22.2 Antimicrobial Active Packages
    • 22.3 Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymers
    • 22.4 Active Materials Based on EVOH Copolymers for the Control of Food Microorganisms
  • Chapter 23: Ethyl Lauroyl Arginate (LAE): Antimicrobial Activity and Applications in Food Systems
    • Abstract
    • 23.1 Manufacturing and Physical-Chemical Properties
    • 23.2 Metabolism and Toxicological Data on LAE
    • 23.3 Antimicrobial Activity
    • 23.4 The Role of LAE in Food Systems
  • Chapter 24: Ethyl Lauroyl Arginate (LAE): Usage and Potential in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 24.1 Introduction
    • 24.2 Legal Aspects of the Use of LAE
    • 24.3 Antimicrobial Activity of LAE
    • 24.4 LAE as Surfactant in Food Emulsion
    • 24.5 Antibacterial Activity of LAE in Food Systems
    • 24.6 Antibacterial Activity of LAE in Active Food Packaging
  • Chapter 25: Volatile Compounds Usage in Active Packaging Systems
    • Abstract
    • 25.1 Introduction
    • 25.2 Active Packaging with Volatile Compounds in Sachets, Pads, Gauze, or Filter Paper
    • 25.3 Active Packaging with Volatile Compounds Incorporated Into the Polymeric Film
    • 25.4 Active Packaging with Volatile Compounds Coated on the Film Surface
  • Chapter 26: Carvacrol-Based Films: Usage and Potential in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 26.1 Introduction
    • 26.2 Antimicrobial Active Packaging
    • 26.3 Antimicrobial Activity of Carvacrol and Use in Packaging Materials
    • 26.4 Edible Polymer Films
    • 26.5 Legislative Issues
    • 26.6 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 27: Gelatin-Based Nanocomposite Films: Potential Use in Antimicrobial Active Packaging
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 27.1 Introduction
    • 27.2 Gelatin
    • 27.3 Gelatin-Based Nanocomposite Film
    • 27.4 Applications of Gelatin-Based Nanocomposite Films
    • 27.5 Conclusions
  • Chapter 28: Smart Nanohydrogels for Controlled Release of Food Preservatives
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 28.1 Introduction
    • 28.2 Active and Smart Packaging
    • 28.3 Food Nanotechnology
    • 28.4 Smart Nanohydrogels as Food Packaging
  • Chapter 29: Antimicrobial Food Packaging Based on Biodegradable Materials
    • Abstract
    • 29.1 Introduction
    • 29.2 AM Packaging Systems
    • 29.3 Biodegradable Packaging Materials
    • 29.4 Natural Biopolymers
    • 29.5 Biopolymers Produced by Microorganisms
    • 29.6 Concluding Remarks
  • Chapter 30: Pullulan: A Suitable Biopolymer for Antimicrobial Food Packaging Applications
    • Abstract
    • 30.1 Introduction
    • 30.2 Properties and Characteristics of Pullulan
    • 30.3 Unique Physiochemical Features of Pullulan-Based Films and Coatings
    • 30.4 Pullulan-Based Coatings and Films with Potential Applications for Food Packaging: Research Studies
    • 30.5 Existing Applications for Pullulan in the Food and Pharmaceutical Industry
    • 30.6 Future Trends, Opportunities, and Challenges
    • 30.7 Conclusions
  • Chapter 31: Use of Metal Nanoparticles for Active Packaging Applications
    • Abstract
    • 31.1 Introduction
    • 31.2 Copper Nanoparticles
    • 31.3 Gold Nanoparticles
    • 31.4 Silver Nanoparticles
    • 31.5 Zinc and Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles
    • 31.6 Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles
  • Chapter 32: Silver-Based Antibacterial and Virucide Biopolymers: Usage and Potential in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 32.1 Biopolymers in Food Packaging
    • 32.2 Active Packaging
    • 32.3 Silver as Antimicrobial Agent
    • 32.4 Regulatory Issues
    • 32.5 Silver-Based Antibacterial Biopolymers
    • 32.6 Virucide Activity of Silver Based Polymers
    • 32.7 Conclusions and Future Perspectives
  • Chapter 33: Antimicrobial Food Packaging Incorporated with Triclosan: Potential Uses and Restrictions
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 33.1 Introduction
    • 33.2 Main Characteristics and Mechanism of Action
    • 33.3 Active Food Packaging Incorporated with Triclosan
    • 33.4 Safety Issues and Legislation
    • 33.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 34: Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles for Food Packaging Applications
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 34.1 Introduction
    • 34.2 Antimicrobial Properties of ZnO Nanoparticles
    • 34.3 ZnO for Food Packaging Applications
    • 34.4 Safety Aspects
    • 34.5 Final Considerations
  • Chapter 35: Antimicrobial Spices: Use in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 35.1 Spices: Introduction, History, and Background
    • 35.2 Major Spice and Herb Antimicrobials
    • 35.3 Chemical Components Present in the Spices
    • 35.4 Uses of Plant Antimicrobials
    • 35.5 Mode of Action
    • 35.6 Synergistic and Antagonistic Effects of Components
    • 35.7 Methods of Effectiveness Determination
    • 35.8 Use in Antimicrobial Packaging Applications
    • 35.9 Perspectives
  • Chapter 36: Pediocin Applications in Antimicrobial Food Packaging Systems
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 36.1 Introduction
    • 36.2 Pediocin Structure and Antimicrobial Activity
    • 36.3 Methods of Pediocin Application on Food Preservation
    • 36.4 Pediocin Applications on Food Packaging
    • 36.5 Antimicrobial Food Packaging: Characterization and Migration
    • 36.6 Safety and Regulation Issues
    • 36.7 Future Trends
  • Chapter 37: Casein and Chitosan Polymers: Use in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 37.1 Introduction
    • 37.2 Properties and Composition of Edible Coatings/Films
    • 37.3 Use of Edible Films/Coating to Protect Food Products
    • 37.4 Different Application of Films/Coatings on Food Products
    • 37.5 Sensory Implications
    • 37.6 Conclusions
  • Chapter 38: Multifunctional Films, Blends, and Nanocomposites Based on Chitosan: Use in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 38.1 Introduction
    • 38.2 Chitosan
    • 38.3 Chitosan-Based Package Formulations
    • 38.4 Conclusions and Future Trends
  • Chapter 39: Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol: Use in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 39.1 Introduction
    • 39.2 Understanding Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol and Their AM Effectiveness
    • 39.3 Functioning AM Packaging Systems from Natural Compounds
    • 39.4 Effectiveness of AM Cinnamaldehyde- and Eugenol-Incorporated Packaging Materials
    • 39.5 Applications of AM Cinnamaldehyde and Eugenol-Incorporated Packaging Materials
    • 39.6 Future Trends
  • Chapter 40: Enzybiotics: Application in Food Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 40.1 Introduction
    • 40.2 Materials for the Manufacture of Active Wrapping
    • 40.3 Lysozymes
    • 40.4 Lysostaphin and Related Enzymes
    • 40.5 Bacteriocins
    • 40.6 Conclusions and Future Trends
  • Chapter 41: Zein and Its Composites and Blends with Natural Active Compounds: Development of Antimicrobial Films for Food Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 41.1 Introduction
    • 41.2 Major Properties of Zein and Its Edible Films
    • 41.3 Basic Principles of Developing Antimicrobial Zein Films
    • 41.4 Conclusions
  • Chapter 42: Casein-Based Zataria multiflora Boiss Films: Use in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 42.1 Introduction
    • 42.2 Materials and Methods
    • 42.3 Results and Discussion
    • 42.4 Conclusion
  • Chapter 43: Antimicrobial Peptides from Bacillus spp.: Use in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 43.1 Introduction
    • 43.2 Bacillus Diversity
    • 43.3 Antimicrobial Compounds
    • 43.4 Identification of New Antimicrobial Compounds
    • 43.5 Bacillus in Food Systems
    • 43.6 Antimicrobial Peptides for Food Safety
    • 43.7 Antimicrobial Peptides in Food Packaging
    • 43.8 Application of Active Packaging in Different Food Systems
    • 43.9 Conclusion
  • Chapter 44: Chitosan-Oregano Essential Oil Blends Use as Antimicrobial Packaging Material
    • Abstract
    • 44.1 Introduction
    • 44.2 Edible Films
    • 44.3 Chitosan
    • 44.4 Chitosan and Essential Oils
    • 44.5 Oregano Essential Oil
  • Chapter 45: Thymol: Use in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 45.1 Introduction
    • 45.2 Chemical Structure and Properties
    • 45.3 Types of Microbial Targets
    • 45.4 Incorporation Methods of Active Substance in Plastic Polymeric Matrices
    • 45.5 Release of Active Compounds
    • 45.6 Conclusions
  • Chapter 46: Organic Acids: Usage and Potential in Antimicrobial Packaging
    • Abstract
    • 46.1 Organic Acids for the Preservation of Food
    • 46.2 Toxicological Innocuousness
    • 46.3 Antimicrobial Mode of Action and Cellular Resistance Mechanisms
    • 46.4 Incorporation of Organic Acids in Active Packaging Material
    • 46.5 Assessment of the Release and the Antimicrobial Activity
    • 46.6 Legislation and Labeling in the EU
    • 46.7 Future Potential of Organic Acids in Antimicrobial Packaging
  • Chapter 47: Combinational Approaches for Antimicrobial Packaging: Chitosan and Oregano Oil
    • Abstract
    • 47.1 Introduction
    • 47.2 Chitosan
    • 47.3 Oregano Essential Oil
    • 47.4 Potential for Food Packaging
    • 47.5 Final Remarks
  • Chapter 48: Combinational Approaches for Antimicrobial Packaging: Lysozyme and Lactoferrin
    • Abstract
    • 48.1 Lysozyme
    • 48.2 Lactoferrin
    • 48.3 Lysozyme-Lactoferrin Combination in Food Packages
  • Chapter 49: Combinational Approaches for Antimicrobial Packaging: Natamycin and Nisin
    • Abstract
    • Acknowledgments
    • 49.1 Introduction
    • 49.2 Packaging Formulation: Physicochemical Properties
    • 49.3 Packaging Formulation: Antimicrobial Activity
    • 49.4 Recent Developments Concerning Antimicrobial Edible Food Packaging Containing Natamycin and Nisin
    • 49.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 50: Combinational Approaches for Antimicrobial Packaging: Pectin and Cinnamon Leaf Oil
    • Abstract
    • 50.1 Introduction
    • 50.2 Use of Pectin to Formulate ECs
    • 50.3 Antimicrobial Properties of CLO
    • 50.4 Combination of Pectin with Cinnamon Leaf Essential Oil to Formulate Antimicrobial Edible Films
    • 50.5 Conclusion
  • Chapter 51: Combinational Approaches for Antimicrobial Packaging: Bivalve Shell Waste-Derived Material and Silver
    • Abstract
    • 51.1 Introduction
    • 51.2 Materials and Methods
    • 51.3 Results and Discussion
    • 51.4 Conclusions
  • Chapter 52: Combinational Edible Antimicrobial Films and Coatings
    • Abstract
    • 52.1 Introduction
    • 52.2 Potential Uses of Antimicrobial Edible Films and Coatings
    • 52.3 Target Microorganisms for the Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Properties of Edible Films and Coatings
    • 52.4 Antimicrobial Compounds Incorporated into Edible Film and Coating Formulations
    • 52.5 Commercial Applications of Antimicrobial Edible Films and Coatings
    • 52.6 Regulatory Aspects
    • 52.7 Perspectives and Future Trends
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
676
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Academic Press 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Academic Press
eBook ISBN:
9780128008102
Hardcover ISBN:
9780128007235

About the Editor

Jorge Barros-Velazquez

Dr. Jorge Barros-Velázquez has won several awards in his field for outstanding contributions to research and academia. He has published in many journals and books and serves as the editor of Food and Bioprocess Technology, one of the top international scientific journals in the field of food science and technology.

Affiliations and Expertise

College of Pharmacy/School of Veterinary Sciences, University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain