Advances in Polyurethane Biomaterials - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081006146, 9780081006221

Advances in Polyurethane Biomaterials

1st Edition

Editors: Stuart L. Cooper Jianjun Guan
eBook ISBN: 9780081006221
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081006146
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 28th January 2016
Page Count: 718
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Description

Advances in Polyurethane Biomaterials brings together a thorough review of advances in the properties and applications of polyurethanes for biomedical applications. The first set of chapters in the book provides an important overview of the fundamentals of this material with chapters on properties and processing methods for polyurethane. Further sections cover significant uses such as their tissue engineering and vascular and drug delivery applications

Written by an international team of leading authors, the book is a comprehensive and essential reference on this important biomaterial.

Key Features

  • Brings together in-depth coverage of an important material, essential for many advanced biomedical applications
  • Connects the fundamentals of polyurethanes with state-of-the-art analysis of significant new applications, including tissue engineering and drug delivery
  • Written by a team of highly knowledgeable authors with a range of professional and academic experience, overseen by an editor who is a leading expert in the field

Readership

materials scientists, chemists, engineers, R&D managers in industry and academia

Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Biomaterials
  • Preface
  • Part One. Chemistry, processing and applicationsof polyurethane biomaterials
    • 1. Hierarchal structure–property relationships of segmented polyurethanes
      • 1.1. Introduction
      • 1.2. Structure of segmented polyurethanes
      • 1.3. Soft segment chemistry
      • 1.4. Hard segment chemistry
      • 1.5. Microphase separation
      • 1.6. Compositional effects on mechanical properties
      • 1.7. Compositional effects on degradation rate
      • 1.8. Summary and future perspectives
    • 2. Surface characterization techniques for polyurethane biomaterials
      • 2.1. Friction measurement
      • 2.2. Contact angle
      • 2.3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
      • 2.4. Secondary ion mass spectrometry
      • 2.5. Scanning electron microscopy
      • 2.6. Protein adsorption test
      • 2.7. Hemocompatability measurement
      • 2.8. Antimicrobial efficacy test
      • 2.9. Antibiofilm efficacy
    • 3. Design of biodegradable polyurethanes and the interactions of the polymers and their degradation by-products within in vitro and in vivo environments
      • 3.1. Fundamentals of polyurethane degradation
      • 3.2. Design of new degradable polyurethanes inspired by biodegradation mechanisms
      • 3.3. In vivo testing of polyurethanes from 2005 to 2015
      • 3.4. Coculture using degradable polyurethanes from 2005 to 2015
      • 3.5. Degradable polyurethanes cultured with stem cells for tissue engineering applications
      • 3.6. Degradable polyurethanes used in drug delivery systems
      • 3.7. Physical forms and processing of degradable polyurethanes
      • 3.8. Monomers and oligomers used in degradable polyurethanes
      • 3.9. Summary
    • 4. Novel applications of urethane/urea chemistry in the field of biomaterials
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Citrate-based urethane-doped polyesters
      • 4.3. Waterborne polyurethane biomaterials
      • 4.4. Functionalization of polyurethanes and novel applications of urethane/urea chemistry
      • 4.5. Conclusions and outlook
    • 5. 3D printing of polyurethane biomaterials
      • 5.1. Polyurethane as a candidate material for 3D printing
      • 5.2. Applications of polyurethanes in 3D printing
      • 5.3. Applications of biodegradable polyurethanes in 3D printing
      • 5.4. Low-temperature printing process of waterborne biodegradable polyurethanes
      • 5.5. Conclusion
    • 6. Nanoparticle-induced phenomena in polyurethanes
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Preparation of composites
      • 6.3. Morphology
      • 6.4. Structure
      • 6.5. Nanoparticle-induced self-assembly
      • 6.6. Mechanical behavior
      • 6.7. Thermal behavior
      • 6.8. Flame retardancy
      • 6.9. Antimicrobial activity
      • 6.10. Biomedical application of nanocomposites
      • 6.11. Conclusions
    • 7. Polyurethane nanoparticles, a new tool for biomedical applications?
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Synthesis of polyurethane nanoparticles
      • 7.3. Polyurethane nanoparticles as drug delivery systems
      • 7.4. Polyurethane nanoparticles as diagnosis tools
      • 7.5. Polyurethane nanoparticles as theranostic tools
      • 7.6. Future trends
    • 8. Polyurethanes for controlled drug delivery
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Chemistry of polyurethanes
      • 8.3. Use in drug delivery
      • 8.4. Conclusion and future directions
      • Abbreviations
    • 9. Antibacterial polyurethanes
      • 9.1. Introduction
      • 9.2. Antiadhesive polyurethanes
      • 9.3. Bactericidal polyurethanes
      • 9.4. Other strategies of antibacterial polyurethanes and future perspectives
  • Part Two. Polyurethanes for vascular applications
    • 10. Regulating blood cell adhesion via surface modification of polyurethanes
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Blood–material interactions
      • 10.3. Surface–liquid interactions
      • 10.4. Chemical surface modification
      • 10.5. Physical surface modification
      • 10.6. Conclusion
    • 11. Enhancing polyurethane blood compatibility
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Structural characteristics of segmented polyurethanes as blood-compatible materials
      • 11.3. Utilizing bioactive molecules for surface modification to prevent thrombus formation
      • 11.4. Modification of PU with functional groups
      • 11.5. Blending of a polymer with a PC group to improve blood compatibility
      • 11.6. Concluding remarks
    • 12. Antimicrobial polyurethanes for intravascular medical devices
      • 12.1. Introduction
      • 12.2. PUs in intravascular applications
      • 12.3. Infections associated with intravascular devices
      • 12.4. Pathogenesis of intravascular device–related infections
      • 12.5. Prevention of intravascular device–related infections
      • 12.6. Future perspectives
    • 13. Polyurethanes for cardiac applications
      • 13.1. Introduction: cardiovascular diseases
      • 13.2. Polyurethanes in cardiovascular applications
      • 13.3. Polyurethanes in heart valve replacement
      • 13.4. Cardiac tissue engineering/regenerative medicine
      • 13.5. Polyurethane devices for drug delivery in cardiovascular applications
      • 13.6. General conclusions
    • 14. Nitric oxide-releasing polyurethanes
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Nitric oxide-releasing/generating polyurethanes
      • 14.3. Biomedical applications of nitric oxide-releasing polyurethanes
      • 14.4. Conclusion
    • 15. Mechanical behavior of polyurethane-based small-diameter vascular grafts
      • 15.1. Vascular tissues: structure, diseases, and current treatments
      • 15.2. The importance of a biomimetic mechanical response
      • 15.3. Characterization of mechanical behavior
      • 15.4. Polyurethanes for vascular tissue engineering
      • 15.5. Future trends and perspectives
  • Part Three. Polyurethane scaffolds for tissue engineering
    • 16. Polyurethanes for bone tissue engineering
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Chemistry of polyurethane bone grafts
      • 16.3. Bone grafting
      • 16.4. Osteoconductive bone grafts
      • 16.5. Biologically active bone grafts
    • 17. Antimicrobial nanostructured polyurethane scaffolds
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Techniques for constructing polyurethanes scaffolds
      • 17.3. Strategies to impart antibacterial activity to polyurethanes
      • 17.4. Conclusions and future directions
    • 18. Interaction of cells with polyurethane scaffolds
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Interaction of cells with fibrous polyurethane scaffolds
      • 18.3. Interaction of stem cells with microporous polyurethane scaffolds
      • 18.4. Interaction of cells with other types of polyurethane scaffolds
      • 18.5. Current challenges to understanding the effect of polyurethane scaffold properties on cell fate
      • 18.6. Future perspectives
    • 19. Electrospun fibrous polyurethane scaffolds in tissue engineering
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Electrospinning technique and apparatus
      • 19.3. Factors that affect the electrospinning process
      • 19.4. Methods to enhance cellular infiltration of electrospun scaffolds
      • 19.5. Electrospun polyurethane scaffolds in tissue engineering applications
      • 19.6. Summary and future trends
    • 20. Embolic applications of shape memory polyurethane scaffolds
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. Embolization and occlusion
      • 20.3. Why shape memory polymer scaffolds?
      • 20.4. The future of shape memory polymer scaffolds
    • 21. Scaffolds of biodegradable block polyurethanes for nerve regeneration
      • 21.1. Introduction
      • 21.2. Experimental procedures
      • 21.3. Results and discussion
      • 21.4. Conclusions
    • 22. The use of biodegradable polyurethane in the development of dermal scaffolds
      • 22.1. Introduction
      • 22.2. Why are dermal substitutes necessary?
      • 22.3. Skin structure and function
      • 22.4. The ideal dermal substitute
      • 22.5. Development history of NovoSorb™ biodegradable temporizing dermal matrix for major burn injury
      • 22.6. Proof of concept of cultured composite skin on biodegradable temporizing dermal matrix
      • 22.7. Human trials
      • 22.8. The first use of biodegradable temporizing dermal matrix in moderate to severe burn repair
      • 22.9. Conclusions
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
718
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081006221
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081006146

About the Editor

Stuart L. Cooper

Research interests: Polymer Science and Engineering, Properties of Polyurethanes and Ionomers, Polyurethane Biomaterials, Blood-Material Interactions, Tissue Engineering. Recently awarded AIChE Founders Award for Outstanding Contributions to the Field of Chemical Engineering

Affiliations and Expertise

Professor, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Ohio State University

Jianjun Guan

Scaffolds, Hydrogels, Urea, Esters, Stem cells, Polyurethanes

Affiliations and Expertise

Associate Professor, Materials Science Engineering, Ohio State University