Advances in Non-volatile Memory and Storage Technology - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780857098030, 9780857098092

Advances in Non-volatile Memory and Storage Technology

1st Edition

Editors: Yoshio Nishi
eBook ISBN: 9780857098092
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857098030
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 12th June 2014
Page Count: 532
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Table of Contents

  • Contributor contact details
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Electronic and Optical Materials
  • 1. Overview of non-volatile memory technology: markets, technologies and trends
    • Abstract:
    • 1.1 Introduction
    • 1.2 The non-volatile memory (NVM) market and applications
    • 1.3 Developments in charge storage memory technology
    • 1.4 Alternative memory storage concepts
    • 1.5 Beyond evolutionary architecture scaling
    • 1.6 Future trends
    • 1.7 References
  • Part I: Improvements in Flash technologies
    • 2. Developments in 3D-NAND Flash technology
      • Abstract:
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 2D-NAND Flash memory: limitations in scaling
      • 2.3 3D-NAND Flash memory with vertical channels
      • 2.4 3D-NAND Flash memory with horizontal channels
      • 2.5 Performance and electrical characteristics of different 3D-NAND Flash memory designs
      • 2.6 Conclusion
      • 2.7 References
    • 3. Multi-bit NAND Flash memories for ultra high density storage devices
      • Abstract:
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Array architectures
      • 3.3 Read techniques
      • 3.4 Program and erase algorithms
      • 3.5 Reliability issues in NAND Flash memory technologies
      • 3.6 Monolithic 3D integration
      • 3.7 Conclusion and future trends
      • 3.8 References
    • 4. Improving embedded Flash memory technology: silicon and metal nanocrystals, engineered charge-trapping layers and split-gate memory architectures
      • Abstract:
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Silicon nanocrystals
      • 4.3 Metal nanocrystals
      • 4.4 Charge trap memories
      • 4.5 Split-gate charge trap memories
      • 4.6 Conclusion
      • 4.7 References
  • Part II: Phase change memory (PCM) and resistive random access memory (RRAM) technologies
    • 5. Phase change memory (PCM) materials and devices
      • Abstract:
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Phase change materials: structure and crystallization kinetics
      • 5.3 Properties of phase change materials
      • 5.4 Phase change memory (PCM): principles and modeling
      • 5.5 PCM device design and engineering
      • 5.6 Conclusion and future trends
      • 5.7 References
    • 6. Nanowire phase change memory (PCM) technologies: principles, fabrication and characterization techniques
      • Abstract:
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Strategies for improving the PCM performance
      • 6.3 The use of nanowires
      • 6.4 Fabrication of phase change nanowires (PC-NWs): top-down approaches
      • 6.5 Fabrication of phase change nanowires (PC-NWs): bottom-up approaches
      • 6.6 Fabrication of phase change nanowires (PC-NWs): other techniques
      • 6.7 Characterization of PC-NWs
      • 6.8 Conclusion
      • 6.9 Sources of further information and advice
      • 6.10 References
    • 7. Nanowire phase change memory (PCM) technologies: properties and performance
      • Abstract:
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Melting temperature and crystallization kinetics
      • 7.3 Phase transition mechanisms
      • 7.4 Thermal properties
      • 7.5 Electrical properties
      • 7.6 Properties of core-shell structures
      • 7.7 Conclusion
      • 7.8 Acknowledgement
      • 7.9 Sources of further information and advice
      • 7.10 References
    • 8. Modeling of resistive random access memory (RRAM) switching mechanisms and memory structures
      • Abstract:
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Methodology for ab initio modeling of OxRRAMs
      • 8.3 Physical concept for OxRRAM switching mechanisms based on density functional theory (DFT)-based ab initio modeling
      • 8.4 OxRRAM optimization based on DFT-based ab initio modeling
      • 8.5 Conclusion and future trends
      • 8.6 References
    • 9. Metal oxide resistive random access memory (RRAM) technology
      • Abstract:
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Operational characteristics of HfO2-based RRAM
      • 9.3 Modeling forming and switching processes
      • 9.4 Materials development: engineering vacancy profiles for RRAM
      • 9.5 Read current instability (random telegraph noise)
      • 9.6 Conclusion
      • 9.7 Acknowledgements
      • 9.8 References
    • 10. Conductive bridge random access memory (CBRAM) technology
      • Abstract:
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Scaling challenges in dynamic random access memory (DRAM)
      • 10.3 Scaling challenges in Flash memory
      • 10.4 Marketplace challenges for emerging memory technologies
      • 10.5 Operation of a CBRAM cell from an atomic wire point of view
      • 10.6 The ON state of a CBRAM cell and the programming operation
      • 10.7 The OFF state of a CBRAM cell and the erase operation
      • 10.8 Conclusion and future trends
      • 10.9 References
    • 11. Memristors for non-volatile memory and other applications
      • Abstract:
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 The realization of memristor devices
      • 11.3 Design of memristor-based non-volatile memory
      • 11.4 Other promising memristor applications
      • 11.5 Acknowledgement
      • 11.6 References
      • 11.7 Appendix: Memristor characteristic properties
  • Part III: Alternative emerging technologies
    • 12. Molecular, polymer and hybrid organic memory devices (OMDs)
      • Abstract:
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Types of organic memory devices (OMDs)
      • 12.3 Conclusion and future trends
      • 12.4 References
    • 13. Nano-electromechanical random access memory (RAM) devices
      • Abstract:
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Device structure and cell operation
      • 13.3 Fabrication process for a prototype cell
      • 13.4 Assessing cell reliability
      • 13.5 Device scaling
      • 13.6 Conclusion
      • 13.7 References
    • 14. Ferroelectric random access memory (FRAM) devices
      • Abstract:
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Basic properties of ferroelectric capacitors
      • 14.3 Ferroelectric materials used for FRAM devices
      • 14.4 FRAM fabrication processes
      • 14.5 Ferroelectric memory cell structure of capacitor-type FRAM devices
      • 14.6 Assessing the reliability of FRAM devices
      • 14.7 Applications of FRAM devices
      • 14.8 Conclusion and future trends
      • 14.9 References
    • 15. Spin-transfer-torque magnetoresistive random access memory (STT-MRAM) technology
      • Abstract:
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Materials and devices
      • 15.3 Improving memory storage
      • 15.4 Improving logic-in-memory architecture
      • 15.5 Future trends
      • 15.6 Conclusion
      • 15.7 Acknowledgement
      • 15.8 Sources of further information and advice
      • 15.9 References
  • Index

Description

New solutions are needed for future scaling down of nonvolatile memory. Advances in Non-volatile Memory and Storage Technology provides an overview of developing technologies and explores their strengths and weaknesses.

After an overview of the current market, part one introduces improvements in flash technologies, including developments in 3D NAND flash technologies and flash memory for ultra-high density storage devices. Part two looks at the advantages of designing phase change memory and resistive random access memory technologies. It looks in particular at the fabrication, properties, and performance of nanowire phase change memory technologies. Later chapters also consider modeling of both metal oxide and resistive random access memory switching mechanisms, as well as conductive bridge random access memory technologies. Finally, part three looks to the future of alternative technologies. The areas covered include molecular, polymer, and hybrid organic memory devices, and a variety of random access memory devices such as nano-electromechanical, ferroelectric, and spin-transfer-torque magnetoresistive devices.

Advances in Non-volatile Memory and Storage Technology is a key resource for postgraduate students and academic researchers in physics, materials science, and electrical engineering. It is a valuable tool for research and development managers concerned with electronics, semiconductors, nanotechnology, solid-state memories, magnetic materials, organic materials, and portable electronic devices.

Key Features

  • Provides an overview of developing nonvolatile memory and storage technologies and explores their strengths and weaknesses
  • Examines improvements to flash technology, charge trapping, and resistive random access memory
  • Discusses emerging devices such as those based on polymer and molecular electronics, and nanoelectromechanical random access memory (RAM)

Details

No. of pages:
532
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2014
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857098092
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857098030

About the Editors

Yoshio Nishi Editor

Professor Yoshio Nishi is a Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and by courtesy in the Department of Material Science and Engineering. He was Director of the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility of National Nanotechnology Infrastructure Network and is now Director of Research of Stanford Center for Integrated Systems at Stanford University, USA

Affiliations and Expertise

Stanford University, USA