Advances in Dietary Lipids and Human Health

Advances in Dietary Lipids and Human Health

1st Edition - May 6, 2022

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  • Editor: Duo Li
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128242193
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128239148

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Description

Advances in Dietary Lipids and Human Health systematically summarizes recent research advances in dietary lipids and human health. The book proposes a strategy for the prevention of NCDs and the management of population and personal health through the rational use of dietary fat. It covers the relationship between total lipids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids and NCDs, and other uncommon fatty acids, such as conjugated fatty acids, middle and short chain fatty acid, furan fatty acids, n-3 docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), and structured fat. Intended for nutrition researchers, dieticians, clinicians and others in academia who are focused on medicine, preventive medicine, public health and food science students, this valuable reference provides information that will assist readers in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, metabolic disorders, diabetes, neuropsychiatric diseases, and cancer by specifically managing dietary lipids.

Key Features

  • Offers an evidence-based, systematic review of dietary fat and fatty acids and health
  • Provides extensive knowledge on the relationship between type and quantity of lipid, fatty acids and NCDs
  • Proposes a strategy for the prevention of NCDs and the management of population and personal health through the rational use of dietary fat

Readership

Nutrition researchers, dieticians, clinicians, and others in academia focused on medicine, preventive medicine, public health and food science students

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Overview of dietary lipids and human health
  • Abstract
  • 1.1: Introduction
  • 1.2: Dietary lipids
  • 1.3: Dietary total fat intake and human health
  • 1.4: Dietary saturated fat intake and human health
  • 1.5: Dietary monounsaturated fat intake and human health
  • 1.6: Dietary polyunsaturated fat intake and human health
  • 1.7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Fatty acids and telomeres in humans
  • Abstract
  • 2.1: Introduction
  • 2.2: Dietary fatty acids and telomeres
  • 2.3: Cross-sectional and prospective studies
  • 2.4: Randomized controlled trials
  • 2.5: Discussion
  • 2.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: The role of lipids in the brain
  • Abstract
  • 3.1: Introduction
  • 3.2: Properties of brain fatty acids
  • 3.3: Where are brain lipids synthesized? In the brain or imported from blood?
  • 3.4: Effects of exogenous/dietary agents on brain lipids
  • 3.5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Lipids and mental health
  • Abstract
  • 4.1: Introduction
  • 4.2: Metabolism of lipids in the brain
  • 4.3: Lipids and inflammation and oxidative stress
  • 4.4: Lipids, microbiota, and immune system
  • 4.5: Lipids and nervous system
  • 4.6: Can omega-3 fatty acids be used as treatment? How to use them?
  • 4.7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Diet in different fat content and cardiometabolic health
  • Abstract
  • 5.1: Introduction
  • 5.2: Diet with different fat-to-carbohydrate ratios and cardiometabolic health
  • 5.3: What we previously conducted
  • 5.4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Dietary lipids and malignant tumor of the digestive system
  • Abstract
  • 6.1: Dietary lipids and gastric cancer
  • 6.2: Dietary lipids and liver carcinoma
  • 6.3: N-3 PUFAs and colon cancer
  • 6.4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Dietary lipids and breast cancer
  • Abstract
  • 7.1: Introduction
  • 7.2: Epidemiological evidence regarding dietary lipids intake and breast cancer
  • 7.3: Effects of n-3 PUFA on breast cancer development
  • 7.4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Marine lipids and diabetes
  • Abstract
  • 8.1: Introduction
  • 8.2: Marine n-3 PUFAs and T2D prevention
  • 8.3: Marine n-3 PUFAs and T2D management
  • 8.4: Marine n-3 PUFAs and gestational diabetes
  • 8.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Lipids and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease
  • Abstract
  • 9.1: Introduction
  • 9.2: Fatty acids and NAFLD
  • 9.3: Factors affecting NAFLD on biomarkers of NAFLD
  • 9.4: Dose–response relationship between n-3 PUFA intake and biomarkers
  • 9.5: The underlying mechanisms why n-3 PUFAs protect against NAFLD
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Dietary lipids and pulmonary diseases
  • Abstract
  • 10.1: Pulmonary diseases
  • 10.2: Dietary lipids and clinically manifest asthma
  • 10.3: Dietary lipids and pneumonia
  • 10.4: Dietary lipids and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • 10.5: Dietary lipids and pulmonary fibrosis
  • 10.6: Dietary lipids and lung cancer
  • 10.7: How do dietary lipids influence pulmonary diseases?
  • 10.8: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Dietary lipids and hypertension
  • Abstract
  • 11.1: Introduction
  • 11.2: General background on the relationship between lipids and hypertension
  • 11.3: Meta-analytic evidence based on dietary intervention studies
  • 11.4: Evidence based on the relevant epidemiological studies
  • 11.5: Biological mechanisms for the antihypertensive effects of dietary   n-3 lipids
  • 11.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Postprandial lipemia and the relationship to health
  • Abstract
  • 12.1: Introduction
  • 12.2: Generation of an atherogenic postprandial phenotype
  • 12.3: Mechanisms linking postprandial lipids to atherogenesis
  • 12.4: Modulators of postprandial lipemia
  • 12.5: Meal timing a novel mediator of postprandial triglycerides
  • 12.6: Nonmodifiable factors: Evidence of ethnic/genetic influences on postprandial lipemia
  • 12.7: Assessment of postprandial lipemia is important for CVD risk screening
  • 12.8: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 13: The metabolites derived from lipids and their effects on human health
  • Abstract
  • 13.1: Introduction
  • 13.2: The gut microbiota and lipid metabolism
  • 13.3: Effects of lipid metabolites on CVDs
  • 13.4: Metabolites derived from lipids that correlate with cancer incidence
  • 13.5: Metabolites derived from lipids that correlated with neurodegenerative disease
  • 13.6: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory diseases
  • Abstract
  • 14.1: Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory processes
  • 14.2: Marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and inflammatory diseases
  • 14.3: What are the gaps in evidence that need attention?
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Lipids and birth defects
  • Abstract
  • 15.1: Introduction
  • 15.2: Evidence relating lipids to birth defects risk in human studies
  • 15.3: Evidence relating lipids to birth defects in animal studies
  • 15.4: The possible mechanism for the relationship between lipids and birth defects
  • 15.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Conjugated linolenic acids and their bioactivities
  • Abstract
  • 16.1: Introduction
  • 16.2: Natural sources and utilization of CLNA
  • 16.3: The metabolism of CLNA
  • 16.4: CLNA and carcinogenesis
  • 16.5: CLNA and lipid metabolism
  • 16.6: Effect of conjugated linolenic acid on obesity
  • 16.7: Effect of conjugated linolenic acid on type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • 16.8: Effect of conjugated linolenic acid on inflammatory bowel diseases
  • 16.9: Antioxidant activity of CLNA
  • 16.10: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 17: N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and homocysteine metabolism
  • Abstract
  • 17.1: Introduction
  • 17.2: Epidemiological evidence regarding n-3 PUFAs, genetics, and homocysteine levels
  • 17.3: Effects of n-3 PUFAs on homocysteine: Evidence from animal studies and cell culture
  • 17.4: Experimental epidemiological evidence regarding the effects of n-3 PUFAs on homocysteine metabolism
  • 17.5: Mechanisms by which n-3 PUFAs reduce homocysteine levels and future research
  • 17.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Effect of 1,3-diacylglycerol on cardiometabolic risk
  • Abstract
  • 18.1: Introduction
  • 18.2: The 1,3-diacylglycerol
  • 18.3: Effects of 1,3-diacylglycerol on cardiometabolic risk
  • 18.4: Metabolism of 1,3-diacylglycerol
  • 18.5: Supplementation of 1,3-diacylglycerol
  • 18.6: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 19: Palmitoleic acid in health and disease
  • Abstract
  • 19.1: Introduction
  • 19.2: Is palmitoleic acid a novel lipid hormone?
  • 19.3: Effects of palmitoleic acid on metabolic diseases
  • 19.4: What are the gaps in evidence that need attention?
  • References
  • Chapter 20: Ximenynic acid and its bioactivities
  • Abstract
  • 20.1: Introduction
  • 20.2: Bioactivities, functions, and applications of ximenynic acid
  • 20.3: Safety of ximenynic acid
  • 20.4: Physical characteristics and natural distribution
  • 20.5: Preparation methods of natural ximenynic acid
  • 20.6: Synthesis of ximenynic acid
  • 20.7: Conclusion and future studies of ximenynic acid
  • References
  • Chapter 21: Application of phytosterols in management of plasma cholesterol
  • Abstract
  • 21.1: Introduction
  • 21.2: Structure diversity and sources of dietary phytosterols
  • 21.3: Cholesterol-lowering effects
  • 21.4: Cholesterol-lowering mechanisms
  • 21.5: Commercial applications and regulated policy
  • 21.6: Conclusive remarks and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 22: Lipids in breast milk and formulas
  • Abstract
  • 22.1: Introduction
  • 22.2: Composition of breast milk lipids
  • 22.3: Composition of formulas in lipids
  • 22.4: Breast milk and formula lipid nutrition
  • 22.5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 388
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Academic Press 2022
  • Published: May 6, 2022
  • Imprint: Academic Press
  • eBook ISBN: 9780128242193
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780128239148

About the Editor

Duo Li

Dr Li is the chief professor of nutrition in the Institute of Nutrition & Health, Qingdao University, professor emeritus of nutrition in the Department of Food Science & Nutrition at Zhejiang University, China, and adjunct professor in the Department of Nutrition & Dietetics at Monash University, Australia. He has a Bachelor’s Degree in Medicine (Lanzhou University, China), and MSc (University of Tasmania, Hobart) in Natural Products and PhD in Nutrition (RMIT University, Melbourne) in Australia. He was also a research fellow at Deakin University, and a senior research fellow at RMIT University. Dr Li has more than 390 peer reviewed scientific publications, 16 books or book chapters and 25 inventive patents. Dr Li has integrated research themes on lipids in some four areas: Dietary lipids intake and non-communicable diseases; Nutrigenetics/nutrigenomics of lipids; Metabolism of lipids and fatty acids; Bioactivity and safety evaluation of novel lipids and fatty acids.

Affiliations and Expertise

Chief Professor of Nutrition, Institute of Nutrition and Health, Qingdao University; Professor Emeritus of Nutrition, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Zhejiang University, China; Adjunct Professor, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Monash University, Australia

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