Advances in Battery Technologies for Electric Vehicles - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9781782423775, 9781782423980

Advances in Battery Technologies for Electric Vehicles

1st Edition

Editors: Bruno Scrosati Jürgen Garche Werner Tillmetz
eBook ISBN: 9781782423980
Hardcover ISBN: 9781782423775
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 21st May 2015
Page Count: 546
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Table of Contents

  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy
  • Part One: Introduction
    • 1: Introduction to hybrid electric vehicles, battery electric vehicles, and off-road electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 1.1 Electric mobility: mobility of the future
      • 1.2 Overview of different electric propulsion systems
      • 1.3 Advantages and disadvantages of electric vehicles
      • 1.4 Applications in the field of electric road and off-road vehicles
      • 1.5 Conclusion
    • 2: Carbon dioxide and consumption reduction through electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Energy consumption and CO2 emissions of vehicle production
      • 2.3 Energy consumption of electric vehicles
      • 2.4 Life-cycle energy consumption and CO2 emissions compared
      • 2.5 Potential interactions of electric vehicles with power generation: a case study from Germany
      • 2.6 Outlook
    • 3: The market for battery electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 Current market situation
      • 3.3 Market forces and barriers
      • 3.4 Market potentials
      • 3.5 Economic impacts
    • 4: Battery parameters for hybrid electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Battery parameters for HEV applications
      • 4.3 Overview of lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors for use in HEVs
      • 4.4 Limits to and potential future developments of lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors
      • 4.5 On road transportation in the future
  • Part Two: Types of battery for electric vehicles
    • 5: Lead–acid batteries for hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Technical description of the LAB
      • 5.3 Environmental and safety aspects of LABs
      • 5.4 Different types of automotive LABs
      • 5.5 Advantages and disadvantages of LABs in HEV applications: general
      • 5.6 Potential future developments in LABs and HEVs
      • 5.7 Market forecast
      • 5.8 Sources of further information
    • 6: Nickel–metal hydride and nickel–zinc batteries for hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Technical description of NiMH and NiZn batteries
      • 6.3 Electrical performance, lifetime, and cost of NiMH and NiZn batteries
      • 6.4 Advantages and disadvantages of NiMH and NiZn batteries in HEVs and battery electric vehicles
      • 6.5 Design issues of NiMH and NiZn batteries in HEVs and battery electric vehicles
      • 6.6 Most suitable applications of NiMH and NiZn batteries
      • 6.7 Environmental and safety issues with NiMH and NiZn batteries
      • 6.8 Potential future developments in NiMH and NiZn batteries for HEVs and battery electric vehicles
      • 6.9 Market forces and future trends
    • 7: Post-lithium-ion battery chemistries for hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 7.1 The dawn of batteries succeeding lithium-ion
      • 7.2 Lithium-sulfur battery
      • 7.3 Lithium-air battery
      • 7.4 All-solid-state batteries
      • 7.5 Conversion reaction materials
      • 7.6 Sodium-ion and sodium-air batteries
      • 7.7 Multivalent metals: magnesium battery
      • 7.8 Halide batteries
      • 7.9 Ferrite battery
      • 7.10 Redox-flow batteries
      • 7.11 Proton battery
    • 8: Lithium-ion batteries for hybrid electric vehicles and battery electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 8.1 Introduction and requirements for hybrid electric vehicle, plug-in hybrid electric vehicle, and electric vehicle Li-ion batteries
      • 8.2 Cell designs
      • 8.3 Battery pack design
      • 8.4 Environmental aspects
      • 8.5 Safety requirements
      • 8.6 Future developments in cell chemistries
      • 8.7 Future developments in Li-ion battery packs
      • 8.8 Market forces and future trends
      • 8.9 Summary
    • 9: High-performance electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Cathode
      • 9.3 Anode (high-performance anode materials for lithium-Ion automotive batteries)
      • 9.4 Conclusions
  • Part Three: Battery design and performance
    • 10: Design of high-voltage battery packs for electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Components of HV battery packs
      • 10.3 Requirements of HV battery packs
      • 10.4 Future trends
      • 10.5 Sources of further information
    • 11: High-voltage battery management systems (BMS) for electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Requirements for HV BMS
      • 11.3 Topology of BMS
      • 11.4 Design of HV BMS
      • 11.5 Future trends
      • 11.6 Sources of further information
    • 12: Cell balancing, battery state estimation, and safety aspects of battery management systems for electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Battery cell balancing overview
      • 12.3 Battery state estimation
      • 12.4 Safety aspects of BMSs
      • 12.5 Future trends
      • 12.6 Sources of further information
    • 13: Thermal management of batteries for electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Motivation for battery thermal management
      • 13.3 Heat sources, sinks, and thermal balance
      • 13.4 Design aspects of thermal management systems
      • 13.5 Exemplary design calculations
      • 13.6 Technologies in comparison
      • 13.7 Operational aspects
      • 13.8 Future trends
      • 13.9 Sources of further information
    • 14: Aging of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Aging effects
      • 14.3 Aging mechanisms and root causes
      • 14.4 Cell design and cell integrity
      • 14.5 Aging of battery packs
      • 14.6 Testing
      • 14.7 Field data
      • 14.8 Modeling and simulation
      • 14.9 Diagnostic methods
      • 14.10 Extension of battery lifetime
      • 14.11 Summary
    • 15: Repurposing of batteries from electric vehicles
      • Abstract
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Problem being addressed
      • 15.3 Advantages of battery repurposing
      • 15.4 Ongoing activities
      • 15.5 Performance requirements for various grid-storage applications
      • 15.6 Issues and mitigation
      • 15.7 Market forces and future trends
      • 15.8 Additional sources of information
    • 16: Computer simulation for battery design and lifetime prediction
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 16.1 Introduction
      • 16.2 Literature review
      • 16.3 Essentials of the multiscale modeling approach
      • 16.4 Simulations
      • 16.5 Conclusion
  • Part Four: Infrastructure and standards
    • 17: Electric road vehicle battery charging systems and infrastructure
      • Abstract
      • 17.1 Introduction
      • 17.2 Mobility behavior and charging infrastructure
      • 17.3 Classification of battery charging systems and infrastructure
      • 17.4 Advantages and disadvantages of the solutions for battery charging systems and infrastructure
      • 17.5 Market forces and future trends
      • 17.6 Sources of further information
    • 18: Standards for electric vehicle batteries and associated testing procedures
      • Abstract
      • 18.1 Introduction
      • 18.2 Standards for electric vehicle (EV) batteries
      • 18.3 Testing procedures for EV batteries
      • 18.4 Future trends in battery testing
      • 18.5 Sources of further information
    • 19: Licensing regulations for electric vehicles: legal requirements regarding rechargeable energy storage systems
      • Abstract
      • 19.1 Introduction
      • 19.2 Objective of the legal requirements
      • 19.3 Meetings of rechargeable energy storage systems (RESS) to develop the requirements for vehicles of categories M and N
      • 19.4 Work in the informal working group
      • 19.5 Content of the legal requirements
      • 19.6 Outlook
      • Appendix: abbreviations and symbols
    • 20: Recycling lithium batteries
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgment
      • 20.1 Introduction
      • 20.2 Battery recycling
      • 20.3 Recycling technologies
      • 20.4 Early work
      • 20.5 Recent developments
      • 20.6 Government regulations
  • Index

Description

Advances in Battery Technologies for Electric Vehicles provides an in-depth look into the research being conducted on the development of more efficient batteries capable of long distance travel.

The text contains an introductory section on the market for battery and hybrid electric vehicles, then thoroughly presents the latest on lithium-ion battery technology.

Readers will find sections on battery pack design and management, a discussion of the infrastructure required for the creation of a battery powered transport network, and coverage of the issues involved with end-of-life management for these types of batteries.

Key Features

  • Provides an in-depth look into new research on the development of more efficient, long distance travel batteries
  • Contains an introductory section on the market for battery and hybrid electric vehicles
  • Discusses battery pack design and management and the issues involved with end-of-life management for these types of batteries

Readership

R&D managers in the automotive industry, Academics and post-graduate students working on battery technology


Details

No. of pages:
546
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2015
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9781782423980
Hardcover ISBN:
9781782423775

About the Editors

Bruno Scrosati Editor

Bruno Scrosati is Senior Professor at the University of Rome La Sapienza. He received the title of Doctor in Science “honoris causa”,from the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and from the Chalmers University in Sweden. He is European Editor of the “Journal of Power Sources” and author of more than 450 scientific publications.

Affiliations and Expertise

University of Rome: Sapienza, Rome, Italy

Jürgen Garche Editor

Prof. Dr. Jürgen Garche has more than 40 years of experience in battery and fuel cell research & development. In his academic career the focus was on material research. Thereafter, he worked on and directed cell and system development of conventional (LAB, NiCd, NiMH) and advanced (Li-Ion, NaNiCl2, Redox-Flow) batteries. His experience includes also fuel cells (mainly low temperature FCs) and supercaps. He established the battery & FC division of the ZSW in Ulm (Germany), an industry related R&D institute with about 100 scientists and technicians. His interest in battery safety goes back to the work with the very large battery safety testing center of the ZSW. In 2004 he founded the FC&Battery consulting office FCBAT; furthermore he is a senior professor at Ulm University.

Affiliations and Expertise

Fuel Cell and Battery Consulting, Ulm, Germany

Werner Tillmetz Editor

Affiliations and Expertise

Zentrum für Sonnenenergie, Ulm, Germany