Advanced Ceramics for Versatile Interdisciplinary Applications

Advanced Ceramics for Versatile Interdisciplinary Applications

1st Edition - February 23, 2022

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  • Editors: Shiv Singh, Pradip Kumar, D.P. Mondal
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885652
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323899529

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Description

Advanced Ceramics for Versatile Interdisciplinary Applications describes recent progress in ceramic synthesis and their applications in areas of catalysis, lithium-ion batteries, microbial fuel cells, and biomedical applications. Advancements in ceramic syntheses, such as laser additive manufacturing technologies are also discussed, as are developments in magnetic-based, doped and piezoelectric ceramics and their applications. Other sections cover mixed ionic-electronic conducting ceramic membranes for electrochemical applications, ceramic separators for microbial fuel cells, ceramic polymer composites for lithium-ion batteries, and hybrid ceramic nanocomposites for catalysis applications. The use of metal and metal oxide nanostructures as antimicrobial agents offer a wide range of advantages, ranging from straightforward synthesis to less prone towards resistance development by microbes. Finally, the development of biocompatible ceramic materials, mechanical and chemical properties, and applications are discussed in detail. The book will be useful for new researchers, academics and postgraduate students all working in the area of ceramics and their potential applications.

Key Features

  • Focuses on the optical and electrochemical properties of advanced ceramic materials and MXenes
  • Covers synthesis, characterization techniques and a diverse range of applications, including energy and biomaterials
  • Contains contributions from a diverse range of backgrounds across chemistry, physics, materials science, engineering, medical science, environmental and industrial technology, biotechnology and biomedical engineering

Readership

Materials scientists, physicists, chemists and engineers, R&D Managers working in ceramic materials, energy science and technology

Table of Contents

  • Cover image
  • Title page
  • Table of Contents
  • Copyright
  • Dedication
  • Contributors
  • Chapter 1: Existence of advanced ceramic materials in human life
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Ceramic technologies in the future
  • 3: Ceramics components through additive manufacturing
  • 4: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 2: Recent advances in structural ceramics
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Carbides and nitrides
  • 3: Silicides
  • 4: Borides
  • 5: Nanocomposites
  • 6: Polymer-derived ceramics
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 3: Laser additive manufacturing of SiC ceramics
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • Conflicts of interest
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Laser AM technologies
  • 3: Laser and processing parameters
  • 4: Laser-materials interaction
  • 5: Conclusions and future perspectives
  • References
  • Chapter 4: Nanoporous metal and metalloid carbide aerogels
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Types of aerogels
  • 3: Summary and outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 5: Photoluminescent properties of rare-earth doped perovskite calcium silicates and related systems
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Structural properties of calcium silicates
  • 3: Spectral properties of rare-earth oxides
  • 4: Photoluminescent properties of rare-earth doped calcium silicates
  • 5: Applications
  • 6: Summary
  • References
  • Chapter 6: Formation of magnetite-based ceramic materials and their photocatalytic applications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Magnetic ceramics
  • 3: Synthesis methods for magnetite
  • 4: Applications of magnetite
  • 5: Magnetite-based photocatalysts
  • 6: Strategies to improve photocatalytic efficiency of magnetite nanoparticles
  • 7: Other photon-based applications of magnetite nanoparticles
  • 8: Conclusions and future scope
  • References
  • Chapter 7: Doped zinc oxide nanoceramics for the enhancement of optoelectronic properties
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles
  • 3: Tailoring morphologies of ZnO
  • 4: Different methods for the synthesis of ZnO nanostructures
  • 5: Different properties of ZnO nanostructures
  • 6: Optoelectronic properties and application of zinc-oxide
  • References
  • Chapter 8: Piezoelectric ceramics: Advanced applications in electrochemical and electronic fields
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Preparation and characterization of piezoelectric ceramics
  • 3: Applications of piezoelectric ceramics
  • 4: Conclusion and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 9: Polymer-ceramic based solid composite membranes as potential electrolytes for the lithium batteries
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Components of polymer-ceramic based solid composite electrolytes
  • 3: Polymer ceramic-based solid composite electrolytes for lithium batteries
  • 4: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 10: Mixed ionic-electronic conducting (MIEC) oxide ceramics for electrochemical applications
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Transport of charge carriers in MIEC
  • 3: Applications of MIECs
  • 4: Mixed protonic-electronic conducting (MPEC) membranes
  • 5: MIEC materials for solid oxide fuel cell applications
  • References
  • Chapter 11: Ceramic separators for application in microbial fuel cells: A new class of low-cost cation exchange membrane
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Ceramic separators for microbial fuel cells
  • 3: Application of ceramic separators in scaled up MFCs
  • 4: Future challenges and perspectives
  • 5: Conclusions
  • References
  • Chapter 12: Trends, technology, and future prospects of bioceramic materials
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Various modes of bioceramic synthesis
  • 3: Types of bioceramics
  • 4: Challenges
  • 5: Applications of bioceramics
  • 6: Future aspects of bioceramic materials
  • 7: Conclusion
  • References
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 13: Invertebrate-derived bioceramics: An effective alternative source for biomedical applications
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgment
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Natural v/s synthetic bioceramics
  • 3: Invertebrates: Sources of bioceramic
  • 4: Sample processing
  • 5: Methods of hydroxyapatite synthesis from marine invertebrates
  • 6: Characterization
  • 7: Properties and bone tissue engineering application
  • 8: Limitations
  • 9: Modification
  • 10: Commercially available bioceramics
  • 11: Conclusion and future perspective
  • References
  • Chapter 14: Piezoelectric ceramics as stimulatory modulators for regenerative medicine
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Piezoelectric ceramics
  • 3: Classification of piezoelectric ceramics
  • 4: Methods to measure the piezoelectric property
  • 5: Biomedical applications
  • 6: Conclusions and future prospects
  • References
  • Chapter 15: Advances in the synthesis and antimicrobial applications of metal oxide nanostructures
  • Abstract
  • Acknowledgements
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Synthesis of antimicrobial metal oxide nanostructures
  • 3: Characterization of metal oxide nanostructures
  • 4: Antimicrobial applications
  • 5: Mechanism of antimicrobial action
  • 6: Conclusion and future outlook
  • References
  • Chapter 16: Ceramic nanoparticles doped liquid crystals: A review of material properties for display applications
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Perspectives in liquid crystals
  • 3: Experiment designs for liquid crystal display fabrication
  • 4: Molecular relaxation phenomenon and electrical properties in doped liquid crystals
  • 5: Review of literature on ceramic nanoparticle-doped liquid crystals
  • 6: Future scope
  • References
  • Chapter 17: MXenes: Synthesis, properties, and electrochemical performance of titanium, vanadium, and tantalum carbide MXenes as supercapacitor electrodes
  • Abstract
  • 1: The state of the art
  • 2: History of the MAX phases and MXenes
  • 3: MXene synthesis methods
  • 4: Properties of MAX and MXene
  • 5: Conclusion
  • References
  • Chapter 18: Graphene: A prime choice for ceramic composites
  • Abstract
  • 1: Introduction
  • 2: Processing of graphene ceramic composites
  • References
  • Index

Product details

  • No. of pages: 460
  • Language: English
  • Copyright: © Elsevier 2022
  • Published: February 23, 2022
  • Imprint: Elsevier
  • eBook ISBN: 9780323885652
  • Paperback ISBN: 9780323899529

About the Editors

Shiv Singh

Dr. Shiv Singh is currently working as a scientist and assistant professor in CSIR-AMPRI, Bhopal, India. He received his Ph.D. (2015) in chemical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, India. He has expertise in the synthesis of novel carbon-based nanomaterials for energy application. During his Ph.D. (development of metal nanoparticles dispersed carbon micro and nanofibers for biochemical and energy applications), he gained expertise to synthesize inexpensive, chemical vapor deposition grown graphitic carbon materials (CNF/CNT/CNP/Graphene) for biochemical and energy applications. He also had one year’s post-doctoral experience at the Korea Institute of Materials Science, South Korea where they synthesized ultrahigh temperature ceramic composites via polymer infiltration and pyrolysis, and the chemical vapor infiltration process. Currently, he is working on electrode materials for bio/electrochemical reduction of CO2 to value-added products and bioenergy and H2 generation from wastewater. He has more than 30 publications (in high-impact international journals) a few book chapters and one listed patent. Dr. Singh also received the Seal of Excellence certificate from Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions call H2020-MSCA-IF-2018/19 the European Commission.

Affiliations and Expertise

Scientist and Assistant Professor, Lightweight Metallic Materials Division, CSIR-AMPRI, Madhya Pradesh, India

Pradip Kumar

Dr. Pradip Kumar is currently working as a Senior Scientist in CSIR-AMPRI, Bhopal, India. He received his Ph.D. (2012) in Physics from the School of Physical Sciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi, India. He was a BK21 postdoctoral fellow at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and a visiting scientist in the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul, Republic of Korea, where he did innovative research on the fabrication of 2D materials and composites for ultrahigh thermally conductive, EMI shielding and catalysis applications by using low-temperature chemical reduction. Later, he joined the prestigious DST Inspire Faculty Position at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai, India. Before joining CSIR-AMPRI, he was an Assistant Professor (DST Inspire Faculty) at the Central University of Rajasthan, Ajmer, India. Throughout his research career, he has published one patent, two book chapters and over 32 peer-reviewed papers in high impact international journals.

Affiliations and Expertise

Senior Scientist, Integrated Approach for Design & Product Development Division, CSIR-AMPRI, Madhya Pradesh, India

D.P. Mondal

Dr. D. P. Mondal is currently working as a Chief Scientist in CSIR-AMPRI, Bhopal, India. He gained his Ph.D. (1994) in metallurgical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, India. He has more than 25 years’ experience in large scale synthesis ceramics, porous metals such as aluminium, titanium, copper, and magnesium foams and metal matrix composites for structural, energy absorption, EMI shielding and biological applications. Dr. Mondal has a good knowledge of interdisciplinary research and has published more than 150 papers and three book chapters.

Affiliations and Expertise

Chief Scientist, Lightweight Metallic Materials Division, CSIR-AMPRI, Madhya Pradesh, India

Ratings and Reviews

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  • Dhirendra V. Thu Sep 16 2021

    Excellent work

    Thanks to Dr. Shiv. Your are working superbly on utilisation of wastewater as bioenergy. Definately, it would be very useful for us.