Absorption-Based Post-Combustion Capture of Carbon Dioxide
 - 1st Edition - ISBN: 9780081005149, 9780081005156

Absorption-Based Post-Combustion Capture of Carbon Dioxide

1st Edition

Editors: Paul Feron
eBook ISBN: 9780081005156
Hardcover ISBN: 9780081005149
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 16th June 2016
Page Count: 814
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Description

Absorption-Based Post-Combustion Capture of Carbon Dioxide provides a comprehensive and authoritative review of the use of absorbents for post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide. As fossil fuel-based power generation technologies are likely to remain key in the future, at least in the short- and medium-term, carbon capture and storage will be a critical greenhouse gas reduction technique.

Post-combustion capture involves the removal of carbon dioxide from flue gases after fuel combustion, meaning that carbon dioxide can then be compressed and cooled to form a safely transportable liquid that can be stored underground.

Key Features

  • Provides researchers in academia and industry with an authoritative overview of the amine-based methods for carbon dioxide capture from flue gases and related processes
  • Editors and contributors are well known experts in the field
  • Presents the first book on this specific topic

Readership

Research and development professionals in the power generation industry as well as postgraduate researchers in academia working on carbon capture.

Table of Contents

  • Related titles
  • List of contributors
  • Woodhead Publishing Series in Energy
  • Part One. Introductory issues
    • 1. Introduction
      • 1.1. Climate change and greenhouse gas emissions
      • 1.2. Factors influencing CO2 emissions
      • 1.3. Reducing emissions by CO2 capture and storage
      • 1.4. The case for post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 1.5. Amine-based processes for post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 1.6. Book structure
      • 1.7. The future of post-combustion capture
    • 2. The fundamentals of post-combustion capture
      • 2.1. Introduction
      • 2.2. The physics of absorption
      • 2.3. The chemistry of absorption
      • 2.4. Putting it all together
    • 3. Conventional amine scrubbing for CO2 capture
      • 3.1. Introduction
      • 3.2. History
      • 3.3. Basic chemistry and rates
      • 3.4. Simple flowsheet
      • 3.5. Advanced absorption
      • 3.6. Advanced regeneration systems
      • 3.7. Energy criteria for amine selection
      • 3.8. Absorbent management criteria
      • 3.9. Summary of important representative absorption liquids
      • 3.10. Capital and energy cost optimization
      • 3.11. Conclusions
    • 4. Liquid absorbent selection criteria and screening procedures
      • 4.1. Introduction
      • 4.2. Liquid absorbent selection and criteria
      • 4.3. Key absorbent properties
      • 4.4. Experimental determination of fundamental chemical properties
      • 4.5. Bulk CO2 absorption rates and overall CO2 mass transfer coefficients
      • 4.6. Measurement of CO2 equilibrium properties
      • 4.7. Fast-track method for the estimation of overall liquid absorbent performance
  • Part Two. Capture agents
    • 5. Precipitating amino acid solutions
      • 5.1. Introduction
      • 5.2. Fundamentals of amino acid precipitation
      • 5.3. Experimental investigations
      • 5.4. Process development and simulations
      • 5.5. Conclusions
      • 5.6. Research gaps and outlook
    • 6. Aminosilicone systems for post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 6.1. Introduction
      • 6.2. Early work using aminosilicones in CO2 capture
      • 6.3. Liquid absorbent-based capture system
      • 6.4. Aminosilicone-based phase-change process
      • Disclaimer
    • 7. Inorganic salt solutions for post-combustion capture
      • 7.1. Introduction
      • 7.2. Commercial history of the hot potassium carbonate process
      • 7.3. Absorption kinetics in K2CO3 systems
      • 7.4. Vapor–liquid equilibrium
      • 7.5. Solid–liquid equilibrium
      • 7.6. Demonstration of potassium carbonate processes for CO2 capture
      • 7.7. Conclusions
    • 8. Mixed salt solutions for CO2 capture
      • 8.1. Introduction
      • 8.2. Process description
      • 8.3. Process energy requirement
      • 8.4. Results of the bench-scale pilot experiments
      • 8.5. Process modeling
      • 8.6. Summary
    • 9. Dual-liquid phase systems
      • 9.1. Introduction of dual-liquid phase system
      • 9.2. 1,4-Butanediamine (BDA)/N,N-diethylethanolamine (DEEA) dual-liquid phase system
      • 9.3. Other dual-liquid systems
      • 9.4. Conclusions and outlook
    • 10. Enzyme-enhanced CO2 absorption
      • 10.1. Introduction
      • 10.2. Application of enzymes with reactive absorbents
      • 10.3. Impact of enzyme on carbon capture and sequestration process
      • 10.4. Concluding remarks
      • 10.5. Notation
    • 11. Ionic liquids for post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 11.1. Introduction
      • 11.2. Bench-scale studies using reactive ILs for CO2 absorption
      • 11.3. Industrial and pilot studies
      • 11.4. Technical and economic hurdles facing ILs
      • 11.5. Summary and outlook
    • 12. Aqueous ammonia-based post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 12.1. Process chemistry
      • 12.2. Aqueous NH3-based CO2 capture processes
      • 12.3. Performance of aqueous NH3-based post-combustion capture processes
      • 12.4. Further advancements in NH3-based processes
      • 12.5. Conclusions
  • Part Three. Process design
    • 13. Process modifications for CO2 capture
      • 13.1. Introduction
      • 13.2. Why process modifications?
      • 13.3. Process modifications for investment cost reduction
      • 13.4. Process modification for operating cost reduction
      • 13.5. Industrial implementation
    • 14. Gas–liquid contactors in liquid absorbent-based PCC
      • 14.1. Introduction
      • 14.2. Contacting principles of gas–liquid devices
      • 14.3. Types of gas–liquid contactors
      • 14.4. Innovative contactor types
      • 14.5. Conclusion
      • Notation
    • 15. Hybrid amine-based PCC processes, membrane contactors for PCC
      • 15.1. Generalities
      • 15.2. Membrane contactor modeling
      • 15.3. Pilot-plant investigations
      • 15.4. Conclusions and outlook
      • Nomenclature
  • Part Four. Solvent degradation, emissions andwaste handling
    • 16. Degradation of amine-based solvents
      • 16.1. Introduction
      • 16.2. Reaction, mechanisms, and products of amine degradation
      • 16.3. Measuring amine degradation
      • 16.4. Opportunities for controlling amine degradation
      • 16.5. Post-combustion CO2 capture plant design and operation aspects
      • 16.6. Conclusions and recommendations for future research directions
    • 17. Reclaiming of amine-based absorption liquids used in post-combustion capture
      • 17.1. Introduction
      • 17.2. Stripping, neutralization, and filtration
      • 17.3. Thermal reclamation
      • 17.4. Ion exchange
      • 17.5. Electrodialysis
      • 17.6. Economic and environmental considerations
      • 17.7. Conclusions
    • 18. Assessment of corrosion in amine-based post-combustion capture of carbon dioxide systems
      • 18.1. Introduction
      • 18.2. Types of corrosion
      • 18.3. Experiences from corrosion in amine-based natural gas treatment
      • 18.4. Corrosion measurement techniques for amine-based PCC systems
      • 18.5. Effect of process conditions on corrosion in amine-based PCC systems
      • 18.6. Conclusion
      • 18.7. Final comments
    • 19. Overview of aerosols in post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 19.1. Introduction
      • 19.2. Causes and mechanisms
      • 19.3. Countermeasures
      • 19.4. Future outlook
    • 20. Emissions from amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture plants
      • 20.1. Introduction
      • 20.2. The amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture process
      • 20.3. Amine degradation
      • 20.4. Atmospheric releases from amine-based post-combustion CO2 capture plants
      • 20.5. Atmospheric degradation of post-combustion CO2 capture emissions
    • 21. Waste handling in liquid absorbent-based post-combustion capture processes
      • 21.1. Introduction
      • 21.2. Landfill
      • 21.3. Nonhazardous waste landfill
      • 21.4. Hazardous waste landfill
      • 21.5. Power plant
      • 21.6. Suitability of reclaimer waste for firing in coal-fired furnace
      • 21.7. Suitability of reclaimer waste for firing in natural gas combined cycle HRSG
      • 21.8. Cement manufacturing process
      • 21.9. Reclaimer waste suitability in cement kiln
      • 21.10. Preprocessing of reclaimer waste for disposal in cement kiln
      • 21.11. Selective non-catalytic reduction of NOx removal
      • 21.12. Suitability of reclaimer waste as an selective noncatalytic reduction reagent
      • 21.13. Wastewater treatment plant
      • 21.14. Suitability of reclaimer waste for wastewater treatment plant
    • 22. Treatment of flue-gas impurities for liquid absorbent-based post-combustion CO2 capture processes
      • 22.1. Introduction
      • 22.2. NOX control
      • 22.3. Particulate matter control
      • 22.4. SOX emission control
      • 22.5. Mercury control
      • 22.6. Trace elements and other contaminants
      • 22.7. Multipollutant control
      • 22.8. Conclusion
  • Part Five. Process integration and operation
    • 23. Power plant integration methods for liquid absorbent-based post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 23.1. Integrated overall process
      • 23.2. Integration approaches
      • 23.3. Modeling approach
      • 23.4. Power loss of integrated overall process
      • 23.5. Power gain by heat integration
      • 23.6. Example quantification of an integrated overall process
      • 23.7. Summary
    • 24. Dynamic operation of liquid absorbent-based post-combustion CO2 capture plants
      • 24.1. Introduction
      • 24.2. Dynamic operation of post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 24.3. Design considerations for dynamic post-combustion CO2 capture operation
      • 24.4. Developments in dynamic modeling of post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 24.5. Developments in dynamic operation of pilot plants
      • 24.6. Concluding remarks and outlook
    • 25. Renewable energy integration in liquid absorbent-based post-combustion CO2 capture plants
      • 25.1. Introduction
      • 25.2. Base case scenario
      • 25.3. Model-based analysis of renewable energy integration options
      • 25.4. Discussion, conclusions, and future directions
      • Nomenclature
    • 26. Pilot plant operation for liquid absorption-based post-combustion CO2 capture
      • 26.1. Introduction
      • 26.2. Purpose of pilot-scale experiments
      • 26.3. Design philosophy of pilot-scale facilities
      • 26.4. Common measurements and calculations
      • 26.5. Challenges of pilot-scale experimentation
      • 26.6. Pilot plant experience/results
      • 26.7. Conclusions
    • 27. Techno-economics of liquid absorbent-based post-combustion CO2 processes
      • 27.1. Introduction
      • 27.2. Techno-economic evaluation parameters and methodology
      • 27.3. Absorption-based process benchmarking and evaluation
      • 27.4. Absorption process benchmarking and base case performance
      • 27.5. Process potential improvement and cost reduction
      • 27.6. Novel absorbents techno-economic evaluation
      • 27.7. Conclusions and remarks
    • 28. Liquid absorbent-based post-combustion CO2 capture in industrial processes
      • 28.1. Introduction
      • 28.2. Overview of CO2 emissions from industrial processes
      • 28.3. Status of chemical absorption-based post-combustion capture from industrial sources
      • 28.4. Utilization of waste heat and heat integration for absorption-based CO2 capture
      • 28.5. Economics of chemical absorption-based CO2 capture at industrial processes
      • 28.6. Practical limitations and challenges of absorption-based post-combustion capture for industrial processes
      • 28.7. Concluding remarks and development outlook
    • 29. Commercial liquid absorbent-based PCC processes
      • 29.1. Introduction
      • 29.2. CO2 separation technological history and background
      • 29.3. Vendors/technologies: commercial scale
      • 29.4. Vendors/technologies: pilot plant and demonstration scale
  • Index

Details

No. of pages:
814
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780081005156
Hardcover ISBN:
9780081005149

About the Editor

Paul Feron

With a globally recognised reputation for science excellence in carbon capture technology, Dr Paul Feron leads CSIRO’s post-combustion CO2 capture research program, developing new cost-effective, environmentally-benign technologies to reduce atmospheric emissions from coal-fired power. As one of the pioneers of carbon capture research Dr Feron has been working in the field from the early 1990s, and has made a large contribution to both the technology and international policy of the research.

Affiliations and Expertise

CSIRO, Australia

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