A Complete Course in Canning and Related Processes - 14th Edition - ISBN: 9780857096791, 9780857096876

A Complete Course in Canning and Related Processes

14th Edition

Volume 3 Processing Procedures for Canned Food Products

Editors: Susan Featherstone
eBook ISBN: 9780857096876
Hardcover ISBN: 9780857096791
Imprint: Woodhead Publishing
Published Date: 4th September 2015
Page Count: 534
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Table of Contents

  • Preface
  • Introduction
    • 1 Why this series of books?
    • 2 A brief history of canning technology (Figure 1)
    • 3 Nicholas Appert discovers and documents a safe way of heat preserving food
    • 4 Appert food preservation method explained
    • 5 The development of food microbiology
    • 6 Packaging for heat preserved foods
    • 7 Convenience—the can opener is invented
    • 8 Other forms of packing for ‘canned foods’
    • 9 Developments in cannery equipment
    • 10 Canned foods—a healthy option
    • 11 Are canned foods sustainable?
    • 12 The future of thermally processed foods
  • Part One: Fruits, Vegetables, and Pulses
    • 1: Canning of vegetables
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 1.1 Introduction
      • 1.2 Artichokes
      • 1.3 Asparagus
      • 1.4 Beans, green, and wax
      • 1.5 Beans, lima
      • 1.6 Bean salad or ‘three bean’ salad
      • 1.7 Beetroot/beets
      • 1.8 Cabbage
      • 1.9 Carrots
      • 1.10 Cauliflower
      • 1.11 Corn
      • 1.12 Mixed vegetables
      • 1.13 Mushrooms
      • 1.14 Okra
      • 1.15 Onions
      • 1.16 Peas
      • 1.17 Pimientos
      • 1.18 Potatoes
      • 1.19 Sweet potatoes
      • 1.20 Pumpkins and squash
      • 1.21 Rhubarb
      • 1.22 Spinach
      • 1.23 Succotash
      • 1.24 Turnips
    • 2: Canning of fruit
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 2.1 Introduction
      • 2.2 Packing media for canned fruit
      • 2.3 Apples
      • 2.4 Apricots
      • 2.5 Bananas
      • 2.6 Blackberries
      • 2.7 Blueberries
      • 2.8 Cherries, red sour pitted
      • 2.9 Cranberries
      • 2.10 Figs
      • 2.11 Fruit cocktail
      • 2.12 Gooseberries
      • 2.13 Grapefruit
      • 2.14 Olives
      • 2.15 Peaches
      • 2.16 Pears
      • 2.17 Pineapple
      • 2.18 Plums
      • 2.19 Prunes, dried
      • 2.20 Strawberries
      • 2.21 Raspberries
    • 3: Canning of juices, fruit drinks, and water
      • Abstract
      • 3.1 Introduction
      • 3.2 HACCP requirement for fruit juices
      • 3.3 General information about packing juices
      • 3.4 Apple juice
      • 3.5 Grape juice
      • 3.6 Grapefruit juice
      • 3.7 Kraut juice
      • 3.8 Lemon juice
      • 3.9 Orange juice
      • 3.10 Pineapple juice
      • 3.11 Fruit nectars
      • 3.12 Beverages that contain fruit or vegetable juice
      • 3.13 Isotonic (electrolyte) drinks
      • 3.14 Bottled and canned water
    • 4: Canning with pulses and pasta
      • Abstract
      • 4.1 Introduction
      • 4.2 Canned beans in tomato sauce or brine
      • 4.3 Red kidney beans
      • 4.4 Dried lima beans
      • 4.5 Hominy
      • 4.6 Dried peas/processed peas
      • 4.7 Dried field peas
      • 4.8 Chick peas
      • 4.9 Spaghetti
    • 5: Canned tomato products
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 5.1 Introduction
      • 5.2 Preparing tomatoes for canning
      • 5.3 Whole peeled tomatoes
      • 5.4 Canned stewed tomatoes
      • 5.5 Diced tomatoes
      • 5.6 Tomato purée (pulp)
      • 5.7 Tomato paste
      • 5.8 Tomato juice
      • 5.9 Tomato ketchup (catsup)
      • 5.10 Cocktail ketchups
      • 5.11 Chili sauce
  • Part Two: Meat, Fish, and Milk
    • 6: Canning of fish and seafood
      • Abstract
      • 6.1 Introduction
      • 6.2 Canned fish
      • 6.3 Canned molluscs
      • 6.4 Canned crustaceans
    • 7: Canning of meat and poultry
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 7.1 Introduction
      • 7.2 Sterilised meat products
      • 7.3 Cured meat products—pasteurised
      • 7.4 Poultry products
      • 7.5 Other meat products
      • 7.6 Canned meat-based ready meals
    • 8: Canning of milk products
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 8.1 Introduction
      • 8.2 Evaporated milk (unsweetened)
      • 8.3 Condensed milk (sweetened)
  • Part Three: Canning of Preserves and Pickles
    • 9: Jams, jellies, and related products
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 9.1 Introduction
      • 9.2 Plant equipment
      • 9.3 Fruit
      • 9.4 Fruit juice
      • 9.5 Pectin
      • 9.6 Nutritive carbohydrate sweeteners
      • 9.7 Calculation of fruit and sugar ingredients
      • 9.8 Calculation of yield
      • 9.9 pH and gel formation
      • 9.10 Methods of making jams
      • 9.11 Jelly manufacture
      • 9.12 Precautions to be followed in jam manufacture
      • 9.13 Some problems encountered in the jam industry
      • 9.14 Glass packaging jams and jellies
      • 9.15 Recipes and formulas for jams and jellies
      • 9.16 Dietetic fruit jellies and jams
      • 9.17 Dietetic jelly recipes and formulas
      • 9.18 Fruit butters
    • 10: Canning of pickled products
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 10.1 Introduction
      • 10.2 Heat processing of acidified, low-acid, ‘pickled’ products
      • 10.3 Pickled cucumbers
      • 10.4 Pickled peppers
      • 10.5 Sauerkraut
      • 10.6 Pickled onions
      • 10.7 Pickled beetroot
    • 11: Mayonnaise and salad dressing products
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 11.1 Introduction
      • 11.2 Basic principles
      • 11.3 Standards of identity
      • 11.4 Ingredients
      • 11.5 Formulas for mayonnaise and salad dressings
      • 11.6 Manufacture of mayonnaise: batch method
      • 11.7 Manufacture of salad dressing: batch method
      • 11.8 Continuous methods for the manufacture of mayonnaise and salad dressing
      • 11.9 Other operations in manufacturing
    • 12: Packing dry or reduced-water-activity products
      • Abstract
      • 12.1 Introduction
      • 12.2 Peanuts
      • 12.3 Coffee
      • 12.4 Powdered milk
      • 12.5 Jerky
      • 12.6 Canned fruitcake
  • Part Four: Canning of Composite Products
    • 13: Canning of soup
      • Abstract
      • 13.1 Introduction
      • 13.2 Soup stock and ingredients
      • 13.3 A selection of recipes
    • 14: Manufacture of canned baby foods
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 14.1 Introduction
      • 14.2 Quality control
      • 14.3 In-plant inspection
      • 14.4 Containers
      • 14.5 Plant sanitation
      • 14.6 Manufacturing
    • 15: Canning of salads
      • Abstract
      • Acknowledgments
      • 15.1 Introduction
      • 15.2 Ingredients
      • 15.3 Dressings for canned salads
      • 15.4 Canned potato salads
      • 15.5 Canned meat salads
      • 15.6 Canned macaroni salad
  • Appendix
  • Glossary
  • Index

Description

A Complete Course in Canning and Related Processes: Volume 3, Processing Procedures for Canned Food Products, Fourteenth Edition provides a complete course in canning and is an essential guide to canning and related processes.

Professionals and students in the canning industry have benefited from successive editions of the book for over 100 years. This major new edition continues that reputation, with extensively revised and expanded coverage.

The book's three-title set is designed to cover all planning, processing, storage, and quality control phases undertaken by the canning industry in a detailed, yet accessible fashion.

Major changes for the new edition include new chapters on regulation and labeling that contrast the situation in different regions worldwide, updated information on containers for canned foods, and new information on validation and optimization of canning processes, among many other topics.

Key Features

  • Extensively revised and expanded coverage in the field of food canning
  • Designed to cover all planning, processing, storage, and quality control phases undertaken by the canning industry in a detailed, yet accessible fashion
  • Examines the canning of various fruits and vegetables, in addition to meat, milk, fish, and composite products
  • Updated to cover the canning of ready meals, pet food, and UHT milk

Readership

R&D professionals, QA/QC professionals, managers in the canning industry and food microbiologists and engineers with an interest in thermal processing.


Details

No. of pages:
534
Language:
English
Copyright:
© Woodhead Publishing 2016
Published:
Imprint:
Woodhead Publishing
eBook ISBN:
9780857096876
Hardcover ISBN:
9780857096791

Reviews

"This major new edition continues the esteemed reputation of the title, with extensively revised and expanded coverage. The book remains a key technical reference for R&D managers within the food industry, product researchers and academics alike." --FST Magazine


About the Editors

Susan Featherstone Editor

Susan Featherstone is Manager of the Food and Beverage Technology Lab at Nampak R&D

Affiliations and Expertise

Manager, Food and Beverage Technology Lab, Nampak, South Africa