Virus-Insect-Plant Interactions book cover

Virus-Insect-Plant Interactions

In Virus-Insect-Plant Interactions, the world's leading scientists discuss the latest breakthroughs in understanding the biological and ecological factors that define these complex transmission systems and how this knowledge might be used to our advantage in producing innovative, user and environmentally friendly approaches to controlling the spread of plant pathogens by insects. This is an invaluable reference work for researchers, teachers, and students. There are many quick-reference figures and tables, the contents pages include individual chapter abstracts, and each chapter ends with its own bibliography.

Audience
Plant pathologists, virologists, entomologists, molecular biologists, and research graduate students.

Hardbound, 376 Pages

Published: September 2001

Imprint: Academic Press

ISBN: 978-0-12-327681-0

Contents


  • Contributors

    Preface

    Acknowledgments

    Part I: Virus Localization in Plants and Vectors

    1. Tomato Yellow Leaf Curi Virus: A Disease Sexually Transmitted by Whiteflies

    I. Introduction

    II. Geminiviruses Transmitted by The Whitefly Bemisia tabaci

    III. Role of Whitefly Endosymbiotic Chaperonins in Virus Transmission

    IV. Deleterious Effects of Virus on Whiteflies

    V. Sexual Transmission of Virus among Whiteflies

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    2. Possible Etiology of Eriophyid Mite-Borne Pathogens Associated with Double Membrane-Bound Particles

    I. Introduction

    II. Groups of Eriophyid Mite-Associated Diseases

    III. Concluding Remarks

    References

    3. An Anatomical Perspective of Tospovirus Transmission

    I. Introduction

    II. Tospovirus Morphology and Composition

    III. Thrips Vectors and Tospovirus Transmission

    IV. Thrips as Tospvirus Hosts

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    Part II: Elucidation of Transmission Mechanisms

    4. Analysis of Circulative Transmission by Electrical Penetration Graphs

    I. Introduction

    II. The Electrical Penetration Graph Technique

    III. Barley Yellow Dwarf Virus Transmission by Rhopalosiphon padi

    IV. Studies of Other Circulative Viruses

    V. Vector Resistance in Plants

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    5. Analysis of Noncirculative Transmission by Electrical Penetration Graphs

    I. Introduction

    II. Noncirculative Transmission: Properties and Vector Participants

    III. Electronic Analysis of Nonpersistent Transmission

    IV. Electronic Analysis of Semipersistent Transmission

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    6. Ingestion-Egestion Theory of Cuticula-Bome Virus Transmission

    I. Introduction

    II. Terminology

    III. Mechanism of Nonpersistent Transmission

    IV. Site of Virus Retention

    V. Electrical Penetration Graph Analysis

    VI. Role of Watery Saliva in Transmission

    VII. Semipersistent Transmission

    VIII. Concluding Remarks

    References

    7. Mechanism of Virus Transmission by Leaf-Feeding Beetles

    I. Introduction

    II. Vims Acquisition: Beetle-Plant Interactions

    III. Plant Virus-Beetle Interactions

    IV. Deposition of Virus in Beetle Regurgitant

    V. Virus-Host Plant Interactions

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    Part III: Molecular Aspects of Virus-Vector Interaction

    8. Caulimoviruses

    I. Introduction

    II. The Virus

    III. Biology of Caulimovirus Transmission by Aphids

    IV. Identification of Aphid Transmission Factor(s)

    V. Characterization of Aphid Transmission Factor(s)

    VI. Mode of Action of Aphid Transmission Factor(s)

    VII. Regulation of Aphid Transmission Factor's Function(s)

    VIII. Concluding Remarks

    References

    9. Cucumoviruses

    I. Introduction

    II. Viral Genome and Cucumovirus Transmission

    III. Vector Transmission of Cucumber Mosaic Virus

    IV. StractuTQ of Cucumber Mosaic Virus

    V. Mechanisms of Aphid Transmission of Cucumoviruses

    VI. Concluding Remarks

    References

    10. Potyviruses

    I. Introduction

    II. Biology of Potyvims Transmission

    III. Role of Coat Protein in Potyvirus Transmission

    IV. Role of Helper Component

    V. Potyvirus Transmission by Aphids

    VI. Specificity of Potyvirus Transmission by Aphids

    VII. Concluding Remarks

    References

    11. Viral Determinants Involved in Luteovirus-Aphid Interactions

    I. Introduction

    II. Viral Passage through the Aphid

    III. Identifying Viral Proteins Involved in Transmission

    IV. Virus-Symbionin Interactions

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    12. Approaches to Genetic Engineering of Potato for Resistance to Potato Leafroll Virus

    I. Introduction

    II. The Virus

    III. Approaches to Pathogen-Derived Resistance

    IV. Resistance Mechanisms

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    Part IV: Ecology, Epidemiology, and Control

    13. Bemisia: Pest Status, Economics, Biology, and Population Dynamics

    I. Introduction

    II. Economic Impact and Pest Status

    III. Taxonomy Flux

    IV. Population Dynamics

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    14. Whitefly-Bome Viruses in Continental Europe

    I. Introduction

    II. Virus and Virus-Like Diseases

    III. Vectors

    IV. Concluding Remarks

    References

    15. Transmission Properties of Whitefly-Bome Criniviruses and their Impact on Virus Epidemiology

    I. Introduction

    II. Vector Transmission and Virus-Vector Relationships

    III. Criniviruses Infecting Cucurbits

    IV. Criniviruses Infecting Lettuce

    V. Criniviruses Infecting Tomatoes

    VI. Criniviruses Infecting Sweet Potato

    VII. Criniviruses Infecting Weed Hosts

    VIII. Concluding Remarks

    References

    16. Classical Biological Control of Bemisia and Successful Integration of Management Strategies in the United States

    I. Introduction

    II. Foreign Exploration

    III. Pathogenic Fungi for Biological Control of Silverleaf Whitefly

    IV. Evaluation and Release of Silverleaf Whitefly Parasitoids

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    17. Interference with Ultraviolet Vision of Insects to Impede Insect Pests and Insect-Borne Plant Viruses

    I. Introduction

    II. StructureandFunctionof the Insect Compound Eye

    III. Ultraviolet-Dependent, Vision-Related Behavior

    IV. Ultraviolet-Vision Based Management Strategies

    V. Concluding Remarks

    References

    18. Bionomics of Micrutalis malleifera Fowler and Its Transmission of Pseudo-Curly Top Virus

    I. Introduction

    II. Biology of Pseudo-Curly Top Disease

    III. Vector Biology

    IV. Virus Transmission

    References

    Index

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