Quantum Information Processing with Diamond book cover

Quantum Information Processing with Diamond

Principles and Applications

Diamond nitrogen vacancy (NV) color centers can transform quantum information science into practical quantum information technology, including fast, safe computing. Quantum Information Processing with Diamond looks at the principles of quantum information science, diamond materials, and their applications.

Part one provides an introduction to quantum information processing using diamond, as well as its principles and fabrication techniques. Part two outlines experimental demonstrations of quantum information processing using diamond, and the emerging applications of diamond for quantum information science. It contains chapters on quantum key distribution, quantum microscopy, the hybridization of quantum systems, and building quantum optical devices. Part three outlines promising directions and future trends in diamond technologies for quantum information processing and sensing.

Quantum Information Processing with Diamond is a key reference for R&D managers in industrial sectors such as conventional electronics, communication engineering, computer science, biotechnology, quantum optics, quantum mechanics, quantum computing, quantum cryptology, and nanotechnology, as well as academics in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering.

Audience

A standard reference for R&D managers in industrial sectors such as conventional electronics, communication engineering, computer science, biotechnology, quantum optics, quantum mechanics, quantum computing, quantum cryptology and nanotechnology, as well as academics in physics, chemistry, biology and engineering.

Hardbound, 345 Pages

Published: May 2014

Imprint: Woodhead Publishing

ISBN: 978-0-85709-656-2

Contents

  • Foreword 

    Part I Principles and fabrication techniques

    1 Principles of quantum information processing (QIP) using diamond
    P. E. Barclay, University of Calgary, Canada

    2 Principles of quantum cryptography/quantum key distribution (QKD) using attenuated light pulses
    H. Weinfurter, LMU Munich, Germany

    3 Ion implantation in diamond for quantum information processing (QIP): doping and damaging
    R. Kalish, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Israel

    4 Characterisation of single defects in diamond in the development of quantum devices
    J. M. Smith, University of Oxford, UK

    5 Nanofabrication of photonic devices from single crystal diamond for quantum information processing (QIP)
    J. T. Choy, B. J. M. Hausmann, M. J. Burek, T. M. Babinec and M. Lončar, Harvard University, USA

    Part II Experimental demonstrations and emerging applications of quantum information processing (QIP) using diamond

    6 Diamond-based single photon sources and their application in quantum key distribution
    E. Neu, Universität des Saarlandes, Germany and University of Basel, Switzerland and C. Becher, Universität des Saarlandes, Germany

    7 Using defect centres in diamonds to build photonic and quantum optical devices
    A. W. Schell, J. Wolters, T. Schröder and O. Benson, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany

    8 Spin-photon entanglement in diamond for quantum optical networks
    G. Dutt and U. Momeen, University of Pittsburgh, USA

    9 Quantum microscopy using nanodiamonds
    L. P. McGuinness, Institute for Quantum Optics, Germany

    10 Diamond magnetic sensors
    P. Maletinsky, University of Basel, Switzerland and V. Jacques, Universit´e Paris Sud and ENS Cachan, France

    11 Hybridization of quantum systems: coupling nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond to superconducting circuits
    R. Amsüss, Technische Universität Wien, Austria and S. Saito and W. J. Munro, NTT Corporation, Japan12

    Neural circuits and in vivo monitoring using diamond
    K. Fox and S. Prawer, University of Melbourne, Australia

    Part III The future

    13 Promising directions in diamond technologies for quantum information processing (QIP) and sensing
    I. Aharonovich, University of Technology Sydney, Australia and S. Prawer, University of Melbourne, Australia

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