People with Prediabetes Not Taking Adequate Precautions to Avoid Diabetes

New Study Published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine

San Diego, CA, March 2, 2010 – In 2005–2006, almost 30% of the U.S. adult population had prediabetes, but over 90% were unaware of their prediabetes status. Although it is known that diabetes can be prevented or delayed among adults at high risk through modest weight loss and increased physical activity, a study published in the April 2010 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine revealed that only about half of U.S. adults with prediabetes reported that in the past year they tried to lose weight or exercise more.

Researchers from the Division of Diabetes Translation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Emory University, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases examined whether people with prediabetes are adopting preventive measures and what demographic factors might influence these behaviors. Survey data from 1402 adults with prediabetes who participated in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) was analyzed. Survey participants were interviewed and given a fasting plasma glucose test (FPG) and an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT).

All survey participants were asked whether in the past 12 months, they had: (1) tried to control or lose weight, (2) reduced the amount of fat or calories in their diet, and (3) increased physical activity or exercise. They were also asked whether they had been told by a doctor or other health professional in the past 12 months to perform each of these three risk reduction behaviors. In addition, they were asked if they had been screened for diabetes or high blood sugar in the past 3 years. Demographic factors such as gender, age, race/ethnicity, family history, and education level were also self-reported.

The researchers found that in 2005–2006, 29.6% of U.S. adults aged ≥20 years had prediabetes. Only 7.3% of those with prediabetes reported that they had been told that they had a prediabetes condition. Less than half (47.7%) of adults with prediabetes reported a test for diabetes or high blood sugar in the past 3 years.

Although adults with and without prediabetes were similar in race and ethnicity, adults with prediabetes were more likely than those without prediabetes to be male, older, and have lower educational attainment. They were also somewhat more likely to report that an immediate family member had diabetes. Also, adults with prediabetes were more likely to have higher levels of well known cardiovascular disease risk factors, including higher mean weight, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, and triglycerides, as well as a higher prevalence of hypertension.

Writing in the article, the team of investigators led by Linda Geiss of the Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, states, “Reversing the growing diabetes problem will require multiple levels of interventions, including promotion of healthy lifestyles and increased availability of evidence-based community prevention programs for people at high risk. More efficient identification and awareness of prediabetes is a key first step to implementing these changes.”

The article is “Diabetes Risk Reduction Behaviors Among U.S. Adults with Prediabetes” by Linda S. Geiss, MA, Cherie James, MSPH, Edward W. Gregg, PhD, Ann Albright, PhD, RD, David F. Williamson, PhD, and Catherine C. Cowie, PhD. The article appears in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 38, Issue 4 (April 2010) published by Elsevier.

# # #

Full text of the article is available upon request; contact eAJPM@ucsd.edu to obtain copies. To schedule an interview with the authors, please contact Elizabeth Greene at 770-488-5000 or CDC’s Division of Media Relations at 404-639-3286.

About The American Journal of Preventive Medicine
The American Journal of Preventive Medicine is the official journal of The American College of Preventive Medicine and the Association for Prevention Teaching and Research. It publishes articles in the areas of prevention research, teaching, practice and policy. Original research is published on interventions aimed at the prevention of chronic and acute disease and the promotion of individual and community health. The journal features papers that address the primary and secondary prevention of important clinical, behavioral and public health issues such as injury and violence, infectious disease, women's health, smoking, sedentary behaviors and physical activity, nutrition, diabetes, obesity, and alcohol and drug abuse. Papers also address educational initiatives aimed at improving the ability of health professionals to provide effective clinical prevention and public health services. The journal also publishes official policy statements from the two co-sponsoring organizations, health services research pertinent to prevention and public health, review articles, media reviews, and editorials.

The American Journal of Preventive Medicine is ranked 12th out of 105 Public, Environmental & Occupational Health titles and 16th out of 107 General and Internal Medicine titles according to the 2009 Journal Citation Reports© published by Thomson Reuters.

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions — among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence,and ClinicalKey—and publishes over 2,200 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and over 25,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works.

The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world leading provider of professional information solutions in the Science, Medical, Legal and Risk and Business sectors, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Media Contact:
AJPM Editorial Office
+1 858 534 9340
eAJPM@ucsd.edu