Kids with Blocked Tear Ducts at Higher Risk for “Lazy Eye”

Early comprehensive eye examination encouraged in the Journal of AAPOS


Philadelphia, PA, October 12, 2011
 – Amblyopia, sometimes referred to as “lazy eye,” is a cause of poor vision in children. It occurs in about 1.6% to 3.6% of the general population. Early treatment is critical, as the first few years are the most important in the development of eyesight. If amblyopia is not treated in the first 6 to 10 years, poor vision becomes permanent and cannot be corrected. 

A recent study published in the Journal of the AAPOS, the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, has found that children under the age of 3 with a nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO), or blocked tear duct, were at an increased risk for developing amblyopia. About 6% of children are born with blocked tear ducts. 

Authors Noelle S. Matta, CO, CRC, COT, and David I. Silbert, MD, FAAP, of the Family Eye Group in Lancaster, PA, report that of the 375 children studied, 22% had amblyopia risk factors, an 8-fold increase compared with the rate in the general population. More than 63% of the children with risk factors developed clinical amblyopia necessitating treatment. Half of the patients who had risk factors required treatment with glasses, and 1 in 5 required patching therapy. 

“We recommend that all children with congenital NLDO undergo comprehensive examination, including cycloplegic refraction, and be followed carefully if risk factors are present,” commented Ms. Matta.

“What is especially interesting about this study is that all of the patients who required patching had amblyopia in the eye that had the blocked tear duct. This is strong evidence that the association of amblyopia and tear duct obstruction is more than coincidental,” said David G. Hunter, MD, PhD, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of AAPOS and Ophthalmologist-in-Chief at Children’s Hospital Boston.

The article is “High prevalence of amblyopia risk factors in preverbal children with nasolacrimal duct obstruction,” by Noelle S. Matta, CO, CRC, COT and David I. Silbert, MD, FAAP. It appears in the Journal of AAPOS, Volume 15, Issue 4 (August 2011) published by Elsevier.


# # #

Notes for editors
Full text of the article is available at to journalists upon request; contact Rachael Zaleski at 215-239-3658,rachael.zaleski@elsevier.com to obtain a copy or to request an interview with the authors.

About The Journal of Aapos ( www.journals.elsevierhealth.com/periodicals/ympa)
Journal of AAPOS presents expert information on children's eye diseases and on strabismus as it impacts all age groups. Major articles by leading experts in the field cover clinical and investigative studies, treatments, case reports, surgical techniques, descriptions of instrumentation, current concept reviews and new diagnostic techniques. The Journal is the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus

About The American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus ( www.aapos.org)
The goals of the AAPOS, the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus are to advance the quality of children's eye care, support the training of pediatric ophthalmologists, support research activities in pediatric ophthalmology and advance the care of adults with strabismus.



About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions — among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence,and ClinicalKey—and publishes over 2,200 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and over 25,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works.

The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world leading provider of professional information solutions in the Science, Medical, Legal and Risk and Business sectors, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Media contact 
Rachael Zaleski
Elsevier
+1 215 239 3658
rachael.zaleski@elsevier.com