Childhood Dairy Intake May Improve Adolescent Bone Health

New study published in The Journal of Pediatrics

Cincinnati, OH, August 13, 2008 - Dairy is recognized as a key component of a healthy, balanced diet. However, until recently it was unclear how long-term dairy intake contributes to the many aspects of bone health in children, including bone density, bone mineral content, and bone area. A new study soon to be published in The Journal of Pediatrics investigates the effect of childhood dairy intake on adolescent bone health.

Dr. Lynn Moore and colleagues from Boston University School of Medicine analyzed data from the Framingham Children’s Study in an effort to understand the relationship between childhood dairy intake and adolescent bone health. The researchers gathered information from 106 children, 3 to 5 years of age at the beginning of the study, over a 12-year period. The families enrolled in the study were given food diaries to complete for the child and were asked to record everything the child ate and drank for several days each year.

The researchers used these diaries, along with information from the United States Department of Agriculture, to calculate the children’s average daily intake of dairy and other foods. At the end of the 12-year period, the authors assessed the bone health of the now adolescent study participants. They found that the adolescents who had consumed 2 or more servings of dairy per day as children had higher levels of bone mineral content and bone density. Even after adjusting for factors that affect normal bone development, including the child’s growth, body size, and activity level, the authors found that these adolescents’ average bone mineral content was 175 grams higher than the adolescents who had consumed less than 2 servings of dairy per day.

The researchers also evaluated the combined effects of dairy and other foods consumed by the study participants. According to Dr. Moore, “Children who consumed 2 or more servings of dairy and 4 ounces of meat or other nondairy protein had bone mineral contents over 300 grams higher than those children with lower intakes of both dairy and other proteins.” The study highlights the importance of dairy intake throughout childhood, and Dr. Moore points out that “dairy is a key source of proteins, calcium, and other micronutrients including phosphorus and vitamin D.” Parents can promote healthy bone development during adolescence by making dairy a regular part of their child’s diet.

# # #

The study is reported in “Effects of Average Childhood Dairy Intake on Adolescent Bone Health” by Lynn L. Moore, DSc, MPH, M. Loring Bradlee, MS, Di Gao, AS, Martha R. Singer, MPH, RD. The article appears in The Journal of Pediatrics, DOI: 10.1016/j/jpeds.2008.05.016, published by Elsevier.

The Journal of Pediatrics is a primary reference for the science and practice of pediatrics and its subspecialties. This authoritative resource of original, peer-reviewed articles oriented toward clinical practice helps physicians stay abreast of the latest and ever-changing developments in pediatric medicine. The Journal of Pediatrics is ranked 3rd out of 78 pediatric medical journals (2007 Journal Citation Reports, published by Thomson Reuters).

About Elsevier

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions — among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence, and ClinicalKey — and publishes nearly 2,200 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and over 25,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works.

The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world leading provider of professional information solutions in the Science, Medical, Legal and Risk and Business sectors, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Media Contact:
Brigid Huey
+1 513-636-7140
journal.pediatrics@cchmc.org