2009 Nobel Prize Laureates

Elsevier congratulates the 2009 Nobel Laureates and their tremendous achievements in the fields of Medicine, Economics, Chemistry and Physics. We are honored to have been able to work with many of these great scholars in the creation and dissemination of their ground-breaking research. In recognition of their contributions, we are pleased to make the articles they have published with Elsevier freely available to the scientific community.


2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

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Elsevier congratulates Elizabeth H. Blackburn Cell and Current Opinion in Genetics & Development Editorial Board member, Carol W. Greider, Cancer Cell Editorial Board member and former Editorial Board member of BBA - Reviews on Cancer, and Jack W. Szostak Chemistry & Biology Editorial Board Member for being awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine "for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase."

Since the early 1980s, Elizabeth Blackburn and Jack Szostak have worked together on the study of telomeres. Together, they discovered that chomosomes are protected from degradation by a unique DNA sequence in the telomeres. Carol Greider and Blackburn identified telomerase, the enzyme that makes telomere DNA. These discoveries explained how telomeres are protected and revealed that they are built by telomerase. Blackburn, Szostak and Greider have added a unique dimension to our understanding of the cell, opening up new avenues for exploration and the development of new medical therapies.

Access their freely available articles to learn more.


2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

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Elsevier congratulates Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, Cell and Current Opinion in Structural Biology editorial board member Thomas A. Steitz, Structure Editorial Board member and Ada E. Yonath for being awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome."

Thomas A. Steitz, Sterling professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry and Professor of Chemistry at Yale University, is one of three winners to have been awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his work describing the structure and function of the ribosome. His research is focussed on understanding the molecular mechanisms by which proteins and nucleic acids core to molecular biology achieve their biological function.

Ada E. Yonath has published in Trends in Microbiology, Trends in Biotechnology, Structure, Molecular Cell, Cell, Trends in Biochemical Sciences, and the Journal of Molecular Biology.

Access their freely available articles to learn more.


2009 Nobel Prize in Physics

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Elsevier congratulates Charles K. Kao for receiving 1/2 of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Physics "for groundbreaking achievements concerning the transmission of light in fibers for optical communication." His 1966 discovery of the calculation that was required to transmit light over long distances through optical glass fibers eventually led to a breakthrough in fiber optics. His interest and enthousiasm inspired and innovated researchers to engage with the potential that was to be found in the field of fiber optics.

Elsevier congratulates Willard S. Boyle and George E. Smith, who split the other half of the prize "for the invention of an imaging semiconductor circuit- the CCD sensor," which captures light electronically, rather than on film.

George E. Smith, has published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, the Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, and the International Journal of Engineering Science.

Access their freely available articles to learn more.


The 2009 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel

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The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2009 was awarded to Elinor Ostrom and Oliver E. Williamson. Elsevier would like to congratulate the winners for their impressive achievements.

Oliver E. Williamson is the Professor Emeritus of Business, Economics, and Law Haas Business and Public Policy Group at the University of California at Berkley. He was awarded the 2009 prize "for his analysis of economic governance, especially the boundaries of the firm."
Professor Williamson currently serves as Honorary Editor for Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization and is an editorial board member of Journal of Socio-Economics.

Elinor Ostrom is currently the Arthur F. Bentley Professor of Political Science and Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs at Indiana University. She is also a Co-Director for the Center for the Study of Institutions, Population, and Environmental Change (CIPEC). Professor Ostrom was awarded the prize "for her analysis of economic governance, especially the commons.

In addition to publishing many of her own papers with Elsevier, she is an editorial board member for Elsevier journals Ecological Economics and Global Environmental Change.

Access their freely available articles to learn more.