InferMed signs agreement to syndicate NICE content

InferMed today announced that it has signed a syndication agreement with NICE, in a move that will make NICE content available to GP practices through InferMed’s Arezzo Pathways clinical decision support application.

 

InferMed today announced that it has signed a syndication agreement with NICE, in a move that will make NICE content available to GP practices through InferMed’s Arezzo Pathways clinical decision support application.

Arezzo Pathways supports clinicians in using evidence-based care guidelines to improve patient outcomes. The partnership with NICE (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence) aims to encourage increased use of NICE care pathways and guidance.

The syndication relationship will begin with a pilot implementation of ten NICE guidelines in Arezzo Pathways, with clinicians having access to NICE content through the software. Arezzo transforms source guidelines into computer-interpretable, actionable knowledge, presenting it through the clinician’s existing workstation.  Each individual patient’s pathway through the generic NICE guideline is evaluated at each visit, or when data becomes available. Decision options specific to each case are generated and presented to the clinician for decision, dynamically creating personalised pathways - the right healthcare for each patient. Arezzo Pathways supports practice in compliance with guidelines while leaving the clinician freedom to exercise clinical judgement.

Duane Lawrence, InferMed CEO, commented, “Establishing a syndication partnership with NICE is an important development for InferMed, ensuring the availability of NICE content to users of Arezzo Pathways. We look forward to a long and fruitful relationship that will support clinicians in compliance with many more NICE care pathways.”

NICE

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) provides national guidance and advice to improve health and social care.

NICE was originally set up in 1999 as the National Institute for Clinical Excellence, a special health authority, to reduce variation in the availability and quality of NHS treatments and care.

In 2005, after merging with the Health Development Agency, it began developing public health guidance to help prevent ill health and promote healthier lifestyles. Its name changed to the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence.

In April 2013 NICE was established in primary legislation, becoming a Non Departmental Public Body (NDPB) and placing it on a solid statutory footing as set out in the Health and Social Care Act 2012. At this time it took on responsibility for developing guidance and quality standards in social care, and its name changed once more to reflect these new responsibilities.

As an NDPB, it is accountable to its sponsor department, the Department of Health, but operationally it is independent of government. Its guidance and other recommendations are made by independent committees.