Journal News

ASCO Sintering Co to exhibit at design show
http://www.materialstoday.com/metal-processing/news/asco-sintering-co-to-exhibit-at-design-show/

Asco Sintering Co plans to exhibit at the Design-2-Part Show taking place In Santa Clara, CA, USA, from 24-25 May 2017.

The show features hundreds of US job shops and contract manufacturers exhibiting their skills in design, prototypes, production runs, assemblies and electronics.

‘ASCO’s participation in Design2Part helps reinforce our position as an acknowledged industry leader in the manufacture of award-winning highly complex powdered metal parts, specializing in high volume precision gears and planetary gear carriers, through the application of a six sigma zero-defect philosophy,’ the company said in a press release.

This story is reprinted from material from Asco Sintering, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

Solvay consortium to develop high-volume automotive composites
http://www.materialstoday.com/composite-applications/news/solvay-consortium-to-develop-/

Chemical company Solvay, along with auto supplier Bentley and composite manufacturer Penso, has been awarded a multi-million-pound grant by the UK government’s Advanced Propulsion Centre (APC) for the Flexible Lightweight Architecture for Volume Applications (FLAVA) automotive project.

 FLAVA will develop the composite design, material and manufacturing technologies required to implement a modular, multi-material Body-In-White structure suited for large production volume.

 The project, through making composite vehicle prototypes, will look into ways to meet emission legislation with design flexibility, structural integration, lightweighting, vehicle assembly and logistics simplification.

‘We are honoured to have been awarded this grant by the UK Government, and through this project we look forward to further develop our composite technologies portfolio to translate these technologies to the high-volume automotive market,’ said Alex Aucken, UK automotive director, at Solvay Composite Materials.

This story is reprinted from material from Solvay, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

Hexion introduces new bakelite phenolic resin for coatings
http://www.materialstoday.com/composite-parts/news/hexion-introduces-new-bakelite-/

Thermoset resin specialist Hexion Inc has developed a new Bakelite phenolic resin for the production of coatings with a formaldehyde (ULEF) content of less than 0.1%.

 Bakelite PF 7835 LB Resin offers adhesion and substrate protection when used as a crosslinking agent for polyester and acrylic based container coatings. Crosslinkers bind polymer chains together, and can produce tough and resilient coatings that can resist mechanical deformation, aggressive chemicals and sterilization processes. These coatings are used as protective liners in food cans, aerosol cans, tubes, and other metal containers.

‘Our new Bakelite ULEF phenolic resin will enable customers to formulate higher performance coatings, since they will be able to include a higher phenolic content without exceeding the preferred 0.1% limit of free formaldehyde for these applications,’ said JP Aucoin, vice president and general manager, Global Phenolic Specialty Resins. ‘The extremely low level of free formaldehyde in this resin system is significantly less than that of any other phenolic resin available in the market and provides manufacturers with a variety of formulation advantages, such as anticorrosion properties and a long shelf life.’

The new Bakelite resin features free phenol levels below 0.5%, resulting in lower overall free VOCs. Hexion also offers Bakelite ULEF resins specifically designed for use in anticorrosive and powder coatings.

This story is reprinted from material from Hexion, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

 

Topological superconductivity in 2D materials could boost quantum computing
http://www.materialstoday.com/computation-theory/news/topological-superconductivity-in-2d-materials/

This is a schematic of an interpocket paired state, one of two topological superconducting states proposed in the latest work from the lab of Eun-Ah Kim, associate professor of physics at Cornell University. The material used is a monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide. Image: Eun-Ah Kim, Cornell University.
This is a schematic of an interpocket paired state, one of two topological superconducting states proposed in the latest work from the lab of Eun-Ah Kim, associate professor of physics at Cornell University. The material used is a monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide. Image: Eun-Ah Kim, Cornell University.

The experimental realization of ultrathin graphene has ushered in a new age in materials research. What started with graphene has now evolved to encompass numerous related single-atom-thick materials, which have unusual properties due to their ultra-thinness. Among these materials are transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), which offer several key features not available in graphene and are emerging as next-generation semiconductors.

Now, new research shows that TMDs could even realize topological superconductivity and thus provide a platform for quantum computing – the ultimate goal of a research group at Cornell University led by Eun-Ah Kim, associate professor of physics.

"Our proposal is very realistic – that's why it's exciting," Kim said of her group's research. "We have a theoretical strategy to materialize a topological superconductor ... and that will be a step toward building a quantum computer. The history of superconductivity over the last 100 years has been led by accidental discoveries. We have a proposal that's sitting on firm principles.

"Instead of hoping for a new material that has the properties you want, let's go after it with insight and design principle."

Yi-Ting Hsu, a doctoral student in Kim’s group, is lead author of a new paper on this research in Nature Communications. Other team members include Kim group alumni Mark Fischer, now at ETH Zurich in Switzerland, and Abolhassan Vaezi, now at Stanford University.

The group propose that TMDs' unusual properties favor two topological superconducting states, which if experimentally confirmed will open up possibilities for manipulating topological superconductors at temperatures near absolute zero.

Kim identified hole-doped (positive charge-enhanced) single-layer TMDs as a promising candidate for topological superconductivity. She did this based on the known special locking between spin state and the kinetic energy of electrons (spin-valley locking) of single-layer TMDs, as well as the recent observations of superconductivity in electron-doped (negative charge-enhanced) single-layer TMDs.

The group's goal is a superconductor that operates at around 1K (approximately -457°F), which could be sufficiently cooled with liquid helium to maintain quantum computing potential in a superconducting state. Theoretically, housing a quantum computer powerful enough to justify the power needed to keep the superconductor at 1K is not out of the question, Kim said. In fact, IBM already has a 7-qubit (quantum bit) computer that operates at less than 1K, which is available to the public through its IBM Quantum Experience.

A quantum computer with approximately six times more qubits would fundamentally change computing, Kim said. "If you get to 40 qubits, that computing power will exceed any classical computers out there," she said. "And to house a 40-qubit [quantum computer] in cryogenic temperature is not that big a deal. It will be a revolution."

Kim and her group are working with Debdeep Jena and Grace Xing of electrical and computer engineering, and Katja Nowack of physics, through an interdisciplinary research group seed grant from the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR). Each group brings researchers from different departments together, with support from both the university and the US National Science Foundation's Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers program.

"We're combining the engineering expertise of DJ and Grace, and expertise Katja has in mesoscopic systems and superconductors," Kim said. "It requires different expertise to come together to pursue this, and CCMR allows that."

This story is adapted from material from Cornell University, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.

Graphene helps stem cells to differentiate
http://www.materialstoday.com/carbon/news/graphene-helps-stem-cells-differentiate/

Iowa State University researchers (left to right: Metin Uz, Suprem Das, Surya Mallapragada and Jonathan Claussen) are developing technologies to promote nerve regrowth. The monitor shows mesenchymal stem cells (white) aligned along graphene circuits (black). Photo: Christopher Gannon/Iowa State University.
Iowa State University researchers (left to right: Metin Uz, Suprem Das, Surya Mallapragada and Jonathan Claussen) are developing technologies to promote nerve regrowth. The monitor shows mesenchymal stem cells (white) aligned along graphene circuits (black). Photo: Christopher Gannon/Iowa State University.

Researchers looking for ways to regenerate nerves can have a hard time obtaining the key tools of their trade.

Take Schwann cells, which form sheaths around axons – the tail-like parts of nerve cells that carry electrical impulses – and also promote regeneration of those axons and secrete substances that promote the health of nerve cells. In other words, they're very useful to researchers hoping to regenerate nerve cells, especially peripheral nerve cells outside the brain and spinal cord. But Schwann cells are hard to come by in useful numbers.

So researchers have been taking readily-available and non-controversial mesenchymal stem cells (also known as bone marrow stromal stem cells, because they can form bone, cartilage and fat cells) and using a chemical process to turn them, or differentiate them, into Schwann cells. But it's an arduous, step-by-step and expensive process.

Researchers at Iowa State University are now exploring what they hope will be a better way to transform mesenchymal stem cells into Schwann-like cells. They've developed a nanotechnology-based process that involves using inkjet printers to print multi-layer graphene circuits, and then lasers to treat and improve the surface structure and conductivity of those circuits.

It turns out that mesenchymal stem cells adhere and grow well on the treated circuit's raised, rough and three-dimensional (3D) nanostructures. Add small doses of electricity – 100 millivolts for 10 minutes per day over 15 days – and the stem cells differentiate into Schwann-like cells.

The researchers' findings are reported in a paper in Advanced Healthcare Materials, and are also featured on the front cover. Jonathan Claussen, an Iowa State assistant professor of mechanical engineering and an associate at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, is lead author. Suprem Das, a postdoctoral research associate in mechanical engineering and an associate of the Ames Laboratory, and Metin Uz, a postdoctoral research associate in chemical and biological engineering, are first authors.

"This technology could lead to a better way to differentiate stem cells," said Uz. "There is huge potential here."

The electrical stimulation is very effective, differentiating 85% of the stem cells into Schwann-like cells, compared to 75% for the standard chemical process. The electrically-differentiated cells also produced 80 nanograms per milliliter of nerve growth factor compared to 55 nanograms per milliliter for the chemically-treated cells.

The researchers report that the results could lead to changes in how nerve injuries are treated inside the body. "These results help pave the way for in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration where the flexible graphene electrodes could conform to the injury site and provide intimate electrical stimulation for nerve cell regrowth," the researchers wrote in a summary of their findings.

The paper reports several advantages to using electrical stimulation to differentiate stem cells into Schwann-like cells. These include: doing away with the arduous steps of chemical processing; reducing costs by eliminating the need for expensive nerve growth factors; potentially increasing control of stem cell differentiation with precise electrical stimulation; and creating a low maintenance, artificial framework for neural damage repairs.

A key to making it all work is the graphene inkjet printing process developed in Claussen's research lab. This process takes advantage of graphene's wonder-material properties – it's a great conductor of electricity and heat, and is strong, stable and biocompatible – to produce low-cost, flexible and even wearable electronics.

But there is a problem: once the graphene electronic circuits are printed, they have to be treated to improve their electrical conductivity. That usually means exposing them to high temperatures or chemicals, and either could damage flexible printing surfaces including plastic films or paper.

Claussen and his research group solved the problem by replacing the high temperatures and chemicals with computer-controlled laser technology. This laser treatment removes ink binders and reduces graphene oxide to graphene – physically stitching together millions of tiny graphene flakes – improving the electrical conductivity more than a thousand times.

This collaboration between Claussen's group of nanoengineers developing printed graphene technologies and Mallapragada's group of chemical engineers working on nerve regeneration began with some informal conversations on campus. That led to experimental attempts to grow stem cells on printed graphene and then to electrical stimulation experiments.

"We knew this would be a really good platform for electrical stimulation," Das said. "But we didn't know it would differentiate these cells."

But now that it has, the researchers say there are new possibilities to think about. The technology, for example, could one day be used to create dissolvable or absorbable nerve regeneration materials that could be surgically placed in a person's body and wouldn't require a second surgery to remove.

This story is adapted from material from Iowa State University, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.

PyroGenesis tests against chemical weapons
http://www.materialstoday.com/additive-manufacturing/news/pyrogenesis-tests-against-chemical-weapons/

PyroGenesis Canada Inc, which makes plasma based systems for additive manufacturing (AM) says that it has successfully tested its plasma arc chemical warfare agents destruction system (PACWADS) using surrogate chemical warfare agent material.

These tests supported the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Agnostic Compact Demilitarization of Chemical Agents (ACDC) program and far exceeded minimum requirements with over 99.9999% destruction efficiency.

PyroGenesis’ PACWADS is a stand-alone thermal treatment device, with a liquid scrubber system. The technology is designed to be easily transported and deployed in a field setting, close to where threats may be found, to rapidly and safely destroy a wide range of chemical warfare agents.

‘PyroGenesis anticipates that receiving this certification will open the door to additional opportunities, such as the safe destruction of Ebola contaminated material, just to name one,’ said Philippe Beaulieu, senior project manager at PyroGenesis.

‘A successfully developed system would safely destroy chemical warfare agent stockpiles onsite without having to transport these highly toxic chemicals to a remote location for processing,’ added P Peter Pascali, president and CEO of PyroGenesis. 

This story is reprinted from material from PyroGenesis, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

Powder characterization workshop
http://www.materialstoday.com/metal-processing/news/powder-characterization-workshop-/

Powder characterization company Freeman Technology and sorption specialists Surface Measurement Systems, will be hosting a powder characterization workshop on the 18 May 2017 at Imperial College London, UK.

The free one-day event will introduce delegates to powder rheology and surface energy measurements. The workshop will include presentations by Jamie Clayton, operations director at Freeman Technology, who will provide an introduction to understanding powder flow and powder behaviour, and Dr Daryl Williams, founder of Surface Measurement Systems, who will discuss the surface energy of powders and powder performance.

Delegates will also have an opportunity to hear from Jordan Cheyne, Manager, materials characterization team at Pfizer Sandwich and Iain Davidson, manager, physical properties at Vectura.

Click here to access the full agenda (pdf).

This story is reprinted from material from Freeman Technology, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

 

Henkel opens facility for aerospace applications
http://www.materialstoday.com/carbon-fiber/news/henkel-opens-facility-for-aerospace-applications/

The facility will include new buildings and equipment for additional production and warehouse capacities.
The facility will include new buildings and equipment for additional production and warehouse capacities.

Henkel’s Adhesive Technologies business unit has started to build a new production facility for aerospace applications at its site in Montornès, Spain, to meet growing demand for high-impact materials.

The facility will include new buildings and equipment for additional production and warehouse capacities. The first customer deliveries are projected for 2019.

‘The global demand for passenger aircraft is expected to double by 2034, making this a very attractive growth market for us,’ said Jan-Dirk Auris, executive vice president. ‘Aircraft manufacturers and their suppliers are ramping up capacities to support this significant increase in the build rate. Our investment in Montornès will provide additional production capabilities in order to further support global growth in the aerospace market.’

This story is reprinted from material from Henkel, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

New regulations needed for UK composites
http://www.materialstoday.com/carbon-fiber/news/new-regulations-needed-for-uk-composites/

A new report published by the University of Southampton suggests that regulation in the use of composites in marine, rail, oil & gas, and construction could save the UK money.

The report suggests that industry and government should work together to put an end to the constraints that currently inhibit the growth and use of composite materials in these sectors. This could bring more than £4 billion worth of benefit to the UK by the year 2030.

The paper entitled ‘Modernising composite materials regulations’, was complied by a multidisciplinary team from Southampton’s Faculties of Engineering and the Environment, and Business, Law and Art (Institute of Maritime Law), supported by the Southampton Marine and Maritime Institute and the University’s department for Research and Innovation Services (RIS).

‘As economic and sustainability pressures have grown, so too has pressure increased to reduce energy consumption (including fuel usage) whilst improving both ‘through-life costs’ and installation times,’ a press release said. ‘All of these factors have increased demand for stronger, lighter, more intelligent and more durable materials tailor made for purpose.’

Massive increase

In 2013, the global market for composite products was US$68 billion, which is predicted to grow to US$ 105 billion by 2030 (UK Composites Market Study). The UK’s share of this market is £2 billion (around 3%) which is estimated to grow to £12 billion or more by 2030 (2016 UK Composites Strategy). This figure could rise to as high as £16 billion if the sectors that have not previously embraced the use of composites were to experience the same rate of growth as the aerospace sector, where the use of composite materials has increased massively over the last three decades, the report suggests.

‘One of the major inhibitors to the uptake of composites in new sectors is that regulations, codes and standards are often inappropriate for composites,’ added the press release. ‘This is because they are both explicitly and implicitly based on named materials, such as steel, and do not permit consideration of composites applications despite the strengths and benefits of the materials in many cases.’

Regulation in the use of composites in rail could save the UK money.
Regulation in the use of composites in rail could save the UK money.

‘Advanced polymer composite materials have a huge potential to shape the modern world,’ said Professor Ole Thybo Thomsen, head of the Infrastructure Research Group at Southampton and co-author of the position paper. ‘The use of composites in aerospace and automobile design is now the norm, but they have much broader potential for use in other sectors such as in building and bridge construction, railway and rail infrastructure, as well as marine and offshore. In aerospace alone, 52% by weight of the latest generation of aircraft are now composed of composite materials.

‘In the UK there is currently very limited coordination and centralisation of the codes and standards data associated with new composite materials,’ added Professor Simon Quinn, director of the University’s Research Institute for Industry (RiFi) and the lead researcher of the paper. ‘There is neither a coherent development of certified testing facilities, nor a formal process for different sectors to share information and best practice. These factors have reduced productivity, discouraged research and development and innovation, and significantly increased the time to market for new composite products.

 ‘Industry and government have not shared information,’ he added. ‘In the UK there are four government departments dealing with material regulation and the minister with overall responsibility for Health and Safety (the Minister for the Disabled) has neither the mandate nor the resources to harmonise this system. There are also seven agencies involved in regulation, alongside a lack of Suitably Qualified and Experienced Personnel (SQEP), creating a labyrinth of assurance without the guarantee of certification at the end. This is a considerable disincentive to those companies wanting to innovate, and a significant barrier to new companies entering the markets.’

Performance standards

The paper recommends that ‘performance’ assessment methods should be adapted to the needs of each sector to make it easier for manufacturers to prove that their materials can perform to the required operational safety and performance standards related to that sector.

It also calls for one government department to have overall responsibility for regulation, with representation in other departments. The lead department would work closely with the Composites Leadership Forum (CLF) and would oversee material regulatory policy and management of the centre, would have the responsibility to develop codes and standards, and would authorise both UK and nominated overseas test centers.

‘This approach will increase the value, utility and sustainability of the UK’s composites research and by speeding up the ‘route to market’, allowing the UK to both achieve and maximise its predicted market share and prevent the more agile manufacturing nations using our research to gain a first-mover competitive advantage,’ said Rear Admiral Rob Stevens, the lead author of the paper. ‘The next step is create a task group sponsored by government and including key players from the regulatory bodies, industry and academia to take the new regulatory proposition forward in industries that are not utilising composite materials to their full potential.’

An Executive Summary of the paper is available online.  

This story is reprinted from material from the University of Southampton, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

 

Defective diamonds combine for quantum leap forward
http://www.materialstoday.com/crystalline-materials/news/defective-diamonds-quantum-leap-forward/

This photo shows two black diamonds on a superconducting chip (12x4mm); the wiggly line is the microwave resonator, coupling the two diamonds. Photo: TU Wien.
This photo shows two black diamonds on a superconducting chip (12x4mm); the wiggly line is the microwave resonator, coupling the two diamonds. Photo: TU Wien.

Diamonds with minute flaws could play a crucial role in the future of quantum technology. For some time now, researchers at TU Wien in Austria have been studying the quantum properties of such diamonds, but only now have they succeeded in coupling together the specific defects in two separate diamonds. This is an important prerequisite for the development of new applications, such as highly sensitive sensors and switches for quantum computers. The researchers report their advance in a paper in Physical Review Letters.

"Unfortunately, quantum states are very fragile and decay very quickly," says Johannes Majer, head of the hybrid quantum research group at TU Wien’s Institute of Atomic and Subatomic Physics. For this reason, in-depth research is being carried out with the aim of finding quantum systems that can be used for technical applications. Although several promising candidate systems have been developed, each of which possess specific advantages, until now there has been no system that fulfills all the necessary requirements simultaneously.

"Diamonds with very specific defects are one potential candidate for making quantum computers a reality," says Majer. A pure diamond is made up solely of carbon atoms. In some diamonds, however, a nitrogen atom can replace a carbon atom at specific points, which causes a neighboring anomaly within the atomic structure of the diamond where there is no atom at all, referred to as a 'vacancy'. This defect, consisting of the nitrogen atom and the vacancy, forms a quantum system with a very long-lasting state, making diamonds with these particular flaws ideally suited for quantum experiments.

One important prerequisite for many quantum technological applications is the ability to couple such quantum systems together, which until recently had scarcely been possible for diamond systems. "The interaction between two such nitrogen-vacancy defects is extremely weak and only has a reach of around 10nm," says Majer.

With the help of a superconducting quantum chip that produces microwave radiation, this feat has now been achieved. For a number of years, the team at TU Wien has been investigating how diamonds can be manipulated with the help of microwaves. "Billions of nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamonds are coupled collectively with a microwave field," explains Majer. "In this way, the quantum state of the diamonds can be manipulated and read out."

Now, the team has succeeded in taking the next step: they were able to couple the defects in two different diamonds, one at each end of the chip, thus producing an interaction between the two diamonds. "This interaction is mediated by the microwave resonator in the chip in between; here, the resonator plays a similar role to that of a data bus in a regular computer," says Majer.

This coupling between two separate diamonds can be switched on and off selectively. "The two diamonds are rotated against each other at a certain angle," explains Thomas Astner, also at TU Wien and lead author of the paper. "Additionally, a magnetic field is applied, with the direction playing a decisive role: if both diamonds are aligned at the same angle within the magnetic field, then they can be coupled using quantum physics. With other magnetic field directions, it is possible to investigate the individual diamonds without coupling".

This story is adapted from material from TU Wien, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.

Element to acquire Exova Group
http://www.materialstoday.com/metal-processing/news/element-to-acquire-exova-group-/

Materials testing company Element Materials Technology is to acquire Exova Group, a provider of testing and calibration services based in Scotland.

The transaction remains subject to approval from Exova shareholders and regulators. The offer has been accepted by Exova’s Board and its largest shareholder, CD&R, the private equity group, which owns 54% of the company.

The combined business will have more than 6,200 employees, over 195 laboratories and operations in over 30 countries, Element says. The transaction will also increase the company’s reach across North America, Europe and Asia, and help develop better technical expertise.
 
‘This transaction will create a truly global materials testing and product qualification testing business, increasing Element’s operational reach across key markets in North America, Europe and Asia,’ said Charles Noall, CEO of Element. ‘We believe that this acquisition will facilitate greater flexibility to invest further in capacity and technology, driving further opportunities for the combined group.’

This story is reprinted from material from Element, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

 

Arcam reports continued growth
http://www.materialstoday.com/powder-applications/news/arcam-reports-continued-growth/

Arcam reports continued growth in its recent interim report. Net sales increased by 20.2% to SEK 192.2 million, up from SEK159.9 million from the same period last year. However, operating income amounted to SEK7.1 million, a decrease from SEK 8.9 million.

‘We continue to pursue and develop our long-term strategy to industrialize the EBM [electron beam melting] technology and simultaneously developing the metal powder manufacturing and contract manufacturing business,’ said CEO Magnus René. ‘During the quarter, we delivered 15 EBM systems and the majority went to customers in the implant or the aerospace industry. […] The demand for EBM systems is driven by the aerospace industry that is now moving into production, but also by the increasing interest for additive manufacturing from the orthopedic industry.

‘The demand of metal powder for Additive Manufacturing continues to grow rapidly. In the beginning of the year we have secured several long-term supplier agreements to important customers within the orthopedic and the aerospace industries.’

This story is reprinted from material from Arcam, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier.

Dura Composites wins Queen’s Award for Enterprise
http://www.materialstoday.com/composite-industry/news/dura-composites-wins-queens-award-for-enterprise/

Dura Composites was established in 1996 when the company first began selling fibreglass grating.
Dura Composites was established in 1996 when the company first began selling fibreglass grating.

Dura Composites, which makes composite products for flooring, structures and facades, has been awarded The Queen’s Award for Enterprise 2017 in the international trade category.

The Queen’s Awards recognize companies who are making an outstanding contribution to enterprise. Dura won the award for its sustained international growth.

Dura Composites was established in 1996 when the company first began selling fibreglass grating for use as anti-slip walkways in the marine and industrial sectors. Over the past 20 years the product range has expanded to include glass reinforced plastic trench covers, profiles, handraild and stair treads.

‘This award recognises our talented and committed workforce and comes at a really exciting time as we look to the future and the continued growth of our product portfolio,’ said Dura Composites’ MD Stuart Burns. ‘Everyone at Dura Composites is immensely proud and honoured to receive this award, which we are sure will be a springboard for further success both in the UK and overseas.’

This story uses material from Durawith editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. 

Lanxess acquires Chemtura
http://www.materialstoday.com/composite-industry/news/lanxess-acquires-chemtura/

Specialty chemicals company Lanxess has completed its acquisition of US company Chemtura, which supplies flame retardant and lubricant additives.

With a total enterprise value of €2.4 billion, Chemtura is the largest acquisition in the history of Lanxess. In addition to additives, Chemtura’s urethanes and organometallics businesses will be integrated into the Lanxess portfolio and Lanxess will will absorb 2,500 Chemtura employees at 20 sites in 11 countries. The former Chemtura businesses generate annual sales of approximately €1.5 billion. 

‘The acquisition of Chemtura is another major step in our realignment process and a significant milestone in our course of growth,’ said Matthias Zachert, chairman of the board of management of Lanxess AG.’ In its new set-up and with an even more balanced portfolio, the company will be much more stable and profitable. At the same time, Chemtura considerably strengthens our presence in the North American growth region.’ 

Through the acquisition Lanxess has increased its footprint in North America and is is now represented at 24 production sites (previously 12) and employs approximately 2,800 staff (previously 1,500). The region’s share in global sales has increased from approximately 17% to approximately 21%.  

This story uses material from Lanxesswith editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. 

 

GKN to acquire Turkish powder metal company
http://www.materialstoday.com/metal-processing/news/gkn-to-acquire-turkish-powder-metal-company/

GKN plc is to acquire Tozmetal Ticaret Ve Sanayi AS (Tozmetal), a powder metal part manufacturer based in the Istanbul Ataturk Free Trade Zone, Turkey. With sales in 2016 of €24 million, Tozmetal focuses much of its output on hydraulic pump components for European automotive customers.

‘We are very excited to welcome Tozmetal into GKN Powder Metallurgy,’ said Peter Oberparleiter, chief executive of GKN Powder Metallurgy. ‘Tozmetal is a well-run business that will complement our broad presence in the powder metals market.’

Completion of the acquisition is subject to approval from the relevant merger control authorities in Turkey and Germany.

This story uses material from GKNwith editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. 

4M Industrial Oxidation makes reverse merger
http://www.materialstoday.com/carbon-fiber/news/4m-industrial-oxidation-makes-reverse-merger/

4M Industrial Oxidation, a US carbon-fiber technology company, announced today the consummation of its reverse merger with Woodland Holdings Corp, an SEC reporting company. 4M has become a wholly-owned subsidiary of Woodland, through which Woodland will conduct its business operations.

4M Industrial Oxidation was created to commercialize atmospheric plasma oxidation technology for the carbon fiber market with Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The licensed technology creates a high-quality fiber and is one-third the size of conventional technology for the same production capacity, the company says. 4M's green technology also reportedly uses 75% less energy.

‘Our reverse merger with Woodland is a vital step in 4M becoming a public company and is a key element of our growth strategy,’ said Rodney Grubb, 4M's chairman and COO.  ‘This reverse merger is a significant accomplishment for the 4M team. We believe the positioning of 4M as a publicly-traded company will afford us the greatest opportunity to capitalize on the rapidly growing demand for low-cost carbon fiber around the world.’

This story uses material from 4Mwith editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. 

Stratasys launches carbon fiber-filled nylon for 3D printing
http://www.materialstoday.com/carbon-fiber/news/stratasys-launches-carbon-fiberfilled-nylon/

The mechanical properties of FDM Nylon 12CF allow engineers to explore the possible transition from traditional metal parts to 3D printed plastic composites.
The mechanical properties of FDM Nylon 12CF allow engineers to explore the possible transition from traditional metal parts to 3D printed plastic composites.

3D printing specialist Stratasys has developed FDM Nylon 12CF, a carbon fiber-filled thermoplastic which could replace metal components in a range of applications.

Stratasys says that FDM Nylon 12CF is suitable for rapid prototyping, light-weight tooling and end-use parts. It contains 35% chopped carbon-fiber by weight and is suitable for automotive, aerospace, recreational goods, and industrial manufacturing sectors.

‘The very high stiffness-to-weight ratio of the FDM Nylon 12CF material makes it extremely well suited for a wide range of final part and manufacturing tooling applications where the combination of stiffness, strength and low weight is critical to the performance,’ claimed Tim Schniepp, head of tooling solutions for Stratasys. ‘Examples include drill guides, end- of- arm tooling, brackets, jigs, fixtures, and even metal forming tools.’

This story uses material from Stratasyswith editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. 

 

Diab signs long-term contract with Diehl Aircabin
http://www.materialstoday.com/composite-applications/news/diab-signs-longterm-contract-with-diehl-aircabin/

Diab has signed a long term contract with Diehl Aircabin to supply its Divinycell F foam core for cabin applications.

The company says that Divinycell F can minimize the need for labor intensive and putty, sanding, and sweeping steps. Featuring closed cells and minimal water absorption, Divinycell F also eliminates the need for edge fill. Many honeycomb panel designs now incorporate Divinycell F as an edge close-out.

Divinycell F can also withstand high temperatures and exceeds requirements for aircraft interiors with regards to fire, smoke, toxicity (FST), and OSU heat release.

Divinycell is used in aircrft seats, as lavatory interiors, galleys, luggage bins, cabin air distribution and window frames for the Airbus 350 XWB and other aircrafts.

‘It has been a pleasure to work with Diehl, and we are very proud of being a supplier and partner with Diehl Aircabin,’ said Lennart Thalin, Diab Executive Group vice president sales & segments. 

This story uses material from DIABwith editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. 

 

Next-generation transistors revealed in print
http://www.materialstoday.com/electronic-properties/news/nextgeneration-transistors-revealed-in-print/

Jonathan Coleman from AMBER at Trinity College Dublin holds a transistor printed with layered materials; coupling graphene with other layered materials can lead to intelligent smart devices. Photo: AMBER, Trinity College Dublin.
Jonathan Coleman from AMBER at Trinity College Dublin holds a transistor printed with layered materials; coupling graphene with other layered materials can lead to intelligent smart devices. Photo: AMBER, Trinity College Dublin.

Graphene Flagship researchers from AMBER at Trinity College Dublin in Ireland have fabricated printed transistors consisting entirely of layered materials. Reported in a paper in Science, the team’s advance could be used for cheaply printing a range of electronic devices from solar cells to light-emitting diodes (LEDs), with applications from interactive smart food and drug labels to next-generation banknote security and e-passports.

The researchers were led by Jonathan Coleman from AMBER (the Science Foundation Ireland-funded materials science research center hosted in Trinity College Dublin), in collaboration with the groups of Georg Duesberg at AMBER and Laurens Siebbeles at TU Delft in the Netherlands. They used standard printing techniques to combine graphene flakes as electrodes with tungsten diselenide and boron nitride as the channel and separator (two important parts of a transistor) to form an all-printed, all-layered materials, working transistor.

All of these are flakes are just a few nanometers thick but hundreds of nanometers wide. Critically, it is the ability of flakes made from different layered materials to encompass the full range of electronic properties – conducting (in the case of graphene), insulating (boron nitride) and semiconducting (tungsten diselenide) – that allows them to produce the building blocks of electronics. While the performance of these printed layered devices cannot yet compare with advanced transistors, the team believe there is great scope for improving the performance of their printed thin-film transistors (TFTs) beyond the current state-of-the-art.

“In the future, printed devices will be incorporated into even the most mundane objects such as labels, posters and packaging,” says Coleman. “Printed electronic circuitry will allow consumer products to gather, process, display and transmit information: for example, milk cartons will send messages to your phone warning that the milk is about to go out-of-date. We believe that layered materials can compete with the materials currently used for printed electronics.”

All of the layered materials were printed from inks created using a liquid exfoliation method previously developed by Coleman and already licensed. Using liquid processing techniques to create the layered material inks is especially advantageous because it yields large quantities of high-quality layered materials, allowing circuitry to be printed at low cost.

This story is adapted from material from the Graphene Flagship, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views expressed in this article do not necessarily represent those of Elsevier. Link to original source.